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2.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 41(7): 820-825, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096308

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patients with COVID-19 may present with respiratory syndromes indistinguishable from those caused by common viruses. Early isolation and containment is challenging. Although screening all patients with respiratory symptoms for COVID-19 has been recommended, the practicality of such an effort has yet to be assessed. METHODS: Over a 6-week period during a SARS-CoV-2 outbreak, our institution introduced a "respiratory surveillance ward" (RSW) to segregate all patients with respiratory symptoms in designated areas, where appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) could be utilized until SARS-CoV-2 testing was done. Patients could be transferred when SARS-CoV-2 tests were negative on 2 consecutive occasions, 24 hours apart. RESULTS: Over the study period, 1,178 patients were admitted to the RSWs. The mean length-of-stay (LOS) was 1.89 days (SD, 1.23). Among confirmed cases of pneumonia admitted to the RSW, 5 of 310 patients (1.61%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. This finding was comparable to the pickup rate from our isolation ward. In total, 126 HCWs were potentially exposed to these cases; however, only 3 (2.38%) required quarantine because most used appropriate PPE. In addition, 13 inpatients overlapped with the index cases during their stay in the RSW; of these 13 exposed inpatients, 1 patient subsequently developed COVID-19 after exposure. No patient-HCW transmission was detected despite intensive surveillance. CONCLUSIONS: Our institution successfully utilized the strategy of an RSW over a 6-week period to contain a cluster of COVID-19 cases and to prevent patient-HCW transmission. However, this method was resource-intensive in terms of testing and bed capacity.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/transmission , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Patient Isolation , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Population Surveillance/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/diagnosis , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Early Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patients' Rooms/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore , Symptom Assessment , Tertiary Care Centers
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(9)2020 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934078

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) initiates the cytokine/chemokine storm-mediated lung injury. The SARS-CoV unique domain (SUD) with three macrodomains (N, M, and C), showing the G-quadruplex binding activity, was examined the possible role in SARS pathogenesis in this study. The chemokine profile analysis indicated that SARS-CoV SUD significantly up-regulated the expression of CXCL10, CCL5 and interleukin (IL)-1ß in human lung epithelial cells and in the lung tissues of the mice intratracheally instilled with the recombinant plasmids. Among the SUD subdomains, SUD-MC substantially activated AP-1-mediated CXCL10 expression in vitro. In the wild type mice, SARS-CoV SUD-MC triggered the pulmonary infiltration of macrophages and monocytes, inducing CXCL10-mediated inflammatory responses and severe diffuse alveolar damage symptoms. Moreover, SUD-MC actuated NOD-, LRR- and pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome-dependent pulmonary inflammation, as confirmed by the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor and the NLRP3-/- mouse model. This study demonstrated that SARS-CoV SUD modulated NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent CXCL10-mediated pulmonary inflammation, providing the potential therapeutic targets for developing the antiviral agents.


Subject(s)
Chemokine CXCL10/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Cell Line , Chemokine CXCL10/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/deficiency , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , Promoter Regions, Genetic , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Up-Regulation , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/genetics
4.
J Biomed Sci ; 29(1): 52, 2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928188

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus-induced disease 19 (COVID-19) infects more than three hundred and sixty million patients worldwide, and people with severe symptoms frequently die of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recent studies indicated that excessive neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) contributed to immunothrombosis, thereby leading to extensive intravascular coagulopathy and multiple organ dysfunction. Thus, understanding the mechanism of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-induced NET formation would be helpful to reduce thrombosis and prevent ARDS in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. METHODS: We incubated SARS-CoV-2 with neutrophils in the presence or absence of platelets to observe NET formation. We further isolated extracellular vesicles from COVID-19 patients' sera (COVID-19-EVs) to examine their ability to induce NET formation. RESULTS: We demonstrated that antagonistic mAbs against anti-CLEC5A mAb and anti-TLR2 mAb can inhibit COVID-19-EVs-induced NET formation, and generated clec5a-/-/tlr2-/- mice to confirm the critical roles of CLEC5A and TLR2 in SARS-CoV-2-induced lung inflammation in vivo. We found that virus-free extracellular COVID-19 EVs induced robust NET formation via Syk-coupled C-type lectin member 5A (CLEC5A) and TLR2. Blockade of CLEC5A inhibited COVID-19 EVs-induced NETosis, and simultaneous blockade of CLEC5A and TLR2 further suppressed SARS-CoV-2-induced NETosis in vitro. Moreover, thromboinflammation was attenuated dramatically in clec5a-/-/tlr2-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that SARS-CoV-2-activated platelets produce EVs to enhance thromboinflammation via CLEC5A and TLR2, and highlight the importance of CLEC5A and TLR2 as therapeutic targets to reduce the risk of ARDS in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lectins, C-Type , Neutrophils , Pneumonia , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis , Animals , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/immunology , Mice , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/pathology , Neutrophils/virology , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , Receptors, Cell Surface , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology , Toll-Like Receptor 2/immunology
5.
Vet Pathol ; 59(4): 627-638, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820036

ABSTRACT

Emerging and re-emerging human coronaviruses (hCoVs) cause severe respiratory illness in humans, but the basis for lethal pneumonia in these diseases is not well understood. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are key orchestrators of host antiviral defense and tissue tolerance during a variety of respiratory infections, and AM dysfunction is associated with severe COVID-19. In this study, using a mouse model of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection, we examined the role of AMs in MERS pathogenesis. Our results show that depletion of AMs using clodronate (CL) liposomes significantly increased morbidity and mortality in human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 knock-in (hDPP4-KI) mice. Detailed examination of control and AM-depleted lungs at different days postinfection revealed increased neutrophil activity but a significantly reduced MERS-CoV-specific CD4 T-cell response in AM-deficient lungs during later stages of infection. Furthermore, enhanced MERS severity in AM-depleted mice correlated with lung inflammation and lesions. Collectively, these data demonstrate that AMs are critical for the development of an optimal virus-specific T-cell response and controlling excessive inflammation during MERS-CoV infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Macrophages, Alveolar , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Pneumonia , Animals , Clodronic Acid , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Macrophages, Alveolar/immunology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/virology
6.
Nature ; 606(7914): 585-593, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815563

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 is characterized by persistent lung inflammation, inflammatory cytokine production, viral RNA and a sustained interferon (IFN) response, all of which are recapitulated and required for pathology in the SARS-CoV-2-infected MISTRG6-hACE2 humanized mouse model of COVID-19, which has a human immune system1-20. Blocking either viral replication with remdesivir21-23 or the downstream IFN-stimulated cascade with anti-IFNAR2 antibodies in vivo in the chronic stages of disease attenuates the overactive immune inflammatory response, especially inflammatory macrophages. Here we show that SARS-CoV-2 infection and replication in lung-resident human macrophages is a critical driver of disease. In response to infection mediated by CD16 and ACE2 receptors, human macrophages activate inflammasomes, release interleukin 1 (IL-1) and IL-18, and undergo pyroptosis, thereby contributing to the hyperinflammatory state of the lungs. Inflammasome activation and the accompanying inflammatory response are necessary for lung inflammation, as inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway reverses chronic lung pathology. Notably, this blockade of inflammasome activation leads to the release of infectious virus by the infected macrophages. Thus, inflammasomes oppose host infection by SARS-CoV-2 through the production of inflammatory cytokines and suicide by pyroptosis to prevent a productive viral cycle.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inflammasomes , Macrophages , SARS-CoV-2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Interleukin-1 , Interleukin-18 , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Macrophages/metabolism , Macrophages/pathology , Macrophages/virology , Mice , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Pneumonia/metabolism , Pneumonia/virology , Pyroptosis , Receptors, IgG , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
8.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667343

ABSTRACT

Cardiomyocyte injury and troponin T elevation has been reported within COVID-19 patients and are associated with a worse prognosis. Limited data report this association among COVID-19 pregnant patients. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to analyze the association between troponin T levels in severe COVID-19 pregnant women and risk of viral sepsis, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, or maternal death. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort of all obstetrics emergency admissions from a Mexican National Institute. All pregnant women diagnosed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) for SARS-CoV-2 infection between October 2020 and May 2021 were included. Clinical data were collected, and routine blood samples were obtained at hospital admission. Seric troponin T was measured at admission. RESULTS: From 87 included patients, 31 (35.63%) had severe COVID-19 pneumonia, and 6 (6.89%) maternal deaths. ROC showed a significant relationship between troponin T and maternal death (AUC 0.979, CI 0.500-1.000). At a cutoff point of 7 ng/mL the detection rate for severe pneumonia was 83.3% (95%CI: 0.500-0.100) at 10% false-positive rate. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pregnant women with elevated levels of troponin T present a higher risk of death and severe pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Maternal Mortality , Pneumonia/mortality , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Troponin T/blood , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology , Myocytes, Cardiac/pathology , Myocytes, Cardiac/virology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
9.
Nature ; 603(7899): 145-151, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631700

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, which is caused by infection with SARS-CoV-2, is characterized by lung pathology and extrapulmonary complications1,2. Type I interferons (IFNs) have an essential role in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 (refs 3-5). Although rapid induction of type I IFNs limits virus propagation, a sustained increase in the levels of type I IFNs in the late phase of the infection is associated with aberrant inflammation and poor clinical outcome5-17. Here we show that the cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS)-stimulator of interferon genes (STING) pathway, which controls immunity to cytosolic DNA, is a critical driver of aberrant type I IFN responses in COVID-19 (ref. 18). Profiling COVID-19 skin manifestations, we uncover a STING-dependent type I IFN signature that is primarily mediated by macrophages adjacent to areas of endothelial cell damage. Moreover, cGAS-STING activity was detected in lung samples from patients with COVID-19 with prominent tissue destruction, and was associated with type I IFN responses. A lung-on-chip model revealed that, in addition to macrophages, infection with SARS-CoV-2 activates cGAS-STING signalling in endothelial cells through mitochondrial DNA release, which leads to cell death and type I IFN production. In mice, pharmacological inhibition of STING reduces severe lung inflammation induced by SARS-CoV-2 and improves disease outcome. Collectively, our study establishes a mechanistic basis of pathological type I IFN responses in COVID-19 and reveals a principle for the development of host-directed therapeutics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Nucleotidyltransferases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , DNA, Mitochondrial/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Disease Progression , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Macrophages/immunology , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/metabolism , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction , Skin/immunology , Skin/metabolism , Skin/pathology
10.
Clin Immunol ; 235: 108929, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629722

ABSTRACT

Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR7 genes are involved in the host immune response against viral infections including SARS-COV-2. This study aimed to investigate the association between the TLR3(rs3775290) and TLR7(rs179008) polymorphisms with the prognosis and susceptibility to COVID-19 pneumonia accompanying SARS-COV-2 infection. This case-control study included 236 individuals: 136 COVID-19 pneumonia patients and 100 age and sex-matched controls. Two polymorphisms (TLR3 rs3775290 and TLR7 rs179008) were genotyped by allelic discrimination through TaqMan real-time PCR. This study also investigated predictors of mortality in COVID-19 pneumonia through logistic regression. The mutant 'T/T' genotypes and the 'T' alleles of TLR3(rs3775290) and TLR7(rs179008) polymorphisms were significantly associated with increased risk of COVID-19 pneumonia. This study did not report association between the mutant 'T/T' genotypes of TLR3(rs3775290) and TLR7(rs179008) and the disease outcome. In multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of mortality in COVID-19 pneumonia were male sex, SPO2 ≤ 82%, INR > 1, LDH ≥ 1000 U/l, and lymphocyte count<900/mm3 (P < 0.05).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Pneumonia/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 7/genetics , Aged , Alleles , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Gene Frequency , Genotype , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Pneumonia/virology , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 798276, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606542

ABSTRACT

Effects of initiation of programmed-death-protein 1 (PD1) blockade during active SARS-CoV-2 infection on antiviral immunity, COVID-19 course, and underlying malignancy are unclear. We report on the management of a male in his early 40s presenting with highly symptomatic metastatic lung cancer and active COVID-19 pneumonia. After treatment initiation with pembrolizumab, carboplatin, and pemetrexed, the respiratory situation initially worsened and high-dose corticosteroids were initiated due to suspected pneumonitis. After improvement and SARS-CoV-2 clearance, anti-cancer treatment was resumed without pembrolizumab. Immunological analyses with comparison to otherwise healthy SARS-CoV-2-infected ambulatory patients revealed a strong humoral immune response with higher levels of SARS-CoV-2-reactive IgG and neutralizing serum activity. Additionally, sustained increase of Tfh as well as activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was observed. Sequential CT scans showed regression of tumor lesions and marked improvement of the pulmonary situation, with no signs of pneumonitis after pembrolizumab re-challenge as maintenance. At the latest follow-up, the patient is ambulatory and in ongoing partial remission on pembrolizumab. In conclusion, anti-PD1 initiation during active COVID-19 pneumonia was feasible and cellular and humoral immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 appeared enhanced in our hospitalized patient. However, distinguishing COVID-19-associated changes from anti-PD1-associated immune-related pneumonitis posed a considerable clinical, radiographic, and immunologic challenge.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adult , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/immunology , Male , Neoplasm Metastasis , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Pneumonia/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
12.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259910, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinical observations have shown that there is a relationship between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and atypical lymphocytes in the peripheral blood; however, knowledge about the time course of the changes in atypical lymphocytes and the association with the clinical course of COVID-19 is limited. OBJECTIVE: Our purposes were to investigate the dynamics of atypical lymphocytes in COVID-19 patients and to estimate their clinical significance for diagnosis and monitoring disease course. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively identified 98 inpatients in a general ward at Kashiwa Municipal Hospital from May 1st, 2020, to October 31st, 2020. We extracted data on patient demographics, symptoms, comorbidities, blood test results, radiographic findings, treatment after admission and clinical course. We compared clinical findings between patients with and without atypical lymphocytes, investigated the behavior of atypical lymphocytes throughout the clinical course of COVID-19, and determined the relationships among the development of pneumonia, the use of supplemental oxygen and the presence of atypical lymphocytes. RESULTS: Patients with atypical lymphocytes had a significantly higher prevalence of pneumonia (80.4% vs. 42.6%, p < 0.0001) and the use of supplemental oxygen (25.5% vs. 4.3%, p = 0.0042). The median time to the appearance of atypical lymphocytes after disease onset was eight days, and atypical lymphocytes were observed in 16/98 (16.3%) patients at the first visit. Atypical lymphocytes appeared after the confirmation of lung infiltrates in 31/41 (75.6%) patients. Of the 13 oxygen-treated patients with atypical lymphocytes, approximately two-thirds had a stable or improved clinical course after the appearance of atypical lymphocytes. CONCLUSION: Atypical lymphocytes frequently appeared in the peripheral blood of COVID-19 patients one week after disease onset. Patients with atypical lymphocytes were more likely to have pneumonia and to need supplemental oxygen; however, two-thirds of them showed clinical improvement after the appearance of atypical lymphocytes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Leukocyte Disorders/diagnosis , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Leukocyte Disorders/complications , Leukocyte Disorders/epidemiology , Leukocyte Disorders/virology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/pathology , Lymphocytes/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/blood , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/complications , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
13.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1289-1291, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1589037

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a new type of virus, coronavirus disease 2019 broke out globally and caused great harm. The virus mutates rapidly, and more research reports are urgently needed to increase our understanding of the disease. We found the reversed halo sign (RHS) occurred in the imaging manifestations of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 delta variant of concern pneumonia. In the absence of pathology, the mechanism is unknown. Therefore, we reported two cases of RHS and tried to speculate the pathological mechanism through multiple computed tomography follow-up comparisons to judge the prognosis of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 417, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555803

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Data in the literature about HSV reactivation in COVID-19 patients are scarce, and the association between HSV-1 reactivation and mortality remains to be determined. Our objectives were to evaluate the impact of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation in patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infections primarily on mortality, and secondarily on hospital-acquired pneumonia/ventilator-associated pneumonia (HAP/VAP) and intensive care unit-bloodstream infection (ICU-BSI). METHODS: We conducted an observational study using prospectively collected data and HSV-1 blood and respiratory samples from all critically ill COVID-19 patients in a large reference center who underwent HSV tests. Using multivariable Cox and cause-specific (cs) models, we investigated the association between HSV reactivation and mortality or healthcare-associated infections. RESULTS: Of the 153 COVID-19 patients admitted for ≥ 48 h from Feb-2020 to Feb-2021, 40/153 (26.1%) patients had confirmed HSV-1 reactivation (19/61 (31.1%) with HSV-positive respiratory samples, and 36/146 (24.7%) with HSV-positive blood samples. Day-60 mortality was higher in patients with HSV-1 reactivation (57.5%) versus without (33.6%, p = 0.001). After adjustment for mortality risk factors, HSV-1 reactivation was associated with an increased mortality risk (hazard risk [HR] 2.05; 95% CI 1.16-3.62; p = 0.01). HAP/VAP occurred in 67/153 (43.8%) and ICU-BSI in 42/153 (27.5%) patients. In patients with HSV-1 reactivation, multivariable cause-specific models showed an increased risk of HAP/VAP (csHR 2.38, 95% CI 1.06-5.39, p = 0.037), but not of ICU-BSI. CONCLUSIONS: HSV-1 reactivation in critically ill COVID-19 patients was associated with an increased risk of day-60 mortality and HAP/VAP.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpesvirus 1, Human , Pneumonia , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness , Herpesvirus 1, Human/physiology , Humans , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/virology , Risk Assessment
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 23216, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545650

ABSTRACT

This study monitored the long-term immune response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2 infection in patients who had recovered from coronavirus disease (COVID)-19. Anti-nucleocapsid immunoglobulin G (anti-N IgG) titer in serum samples collected at a single (N = 302) or multiple time points (N = 229) 3-12 months after COVID-19 symptom onset or SARS-CoV-2 detection in respiratory specimens was measured by semiquantitative chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. The 531 patients (966 specimens) were classified according to the presence or absence of pneumonia symptoms. Anti N IgG was detected in 87.5% of patients (328/375) at 3 months, 38.6% (93/241) at 6 months, 23.7% (49/207) at 9 months, and 26.6% (38/143) at 12 months. The anti-N IgG seropositivity rate was significantly lower at 6, 9, and 12 months than at 3 months (P < 0.01) and was higher in the pneumonia group than in the non-pneumonia/asymptomatic group at 6 months (P < 0.01), 9 months (P = 0.04), and 12 months (P = 0.04). The rate started to decline 6-12 months after symptom onset. Anti-N IgG sample/cutoff index was positively correlated with age (r = 0.192, P < 0.01) but negatively correlated with interval between symptom onset and blood sampling (r = - 0.567, P < 0.01). These findings can guide vaccine strategies in recovered COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Pneumonia/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , Thailand/epidemiology , Young Adult
16.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 23210, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545637

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV2 pandemic exposed the limitations of artificial intelligence based medical imaging systems. Earlier in the pandemic, the absence of sufficient training data prevented effective deep learning (DL) solutions for the diagnosis of COVID-19 based on X-Ray data. Here, addressing the lacunae in existing literature and algorithms with the paucity of initial training data; we describe CovBaseAI, an explainable tool using an ensemble of three DL models and an expert decision system (EDS) for COVID-Pneumonia diagnosis, trained entirely on pre-COVID-19 datasets. The performance and explainability of CovBaseAI was primarily validated on two independent datasets. Firstly, 1401 randomly selected CxR from an Indian quarantine center to assess effectiveness in excluding radiological COVID-Pneumonia requiring higher care. Second, curated dataset; 434 RT-PCR positive cases and 471 non-COVID/Normal historical scans, to assess performance in advanced medical settings. CovBaseAI had an accuracy of 87% with a negative predictive value of 98% in the quarantine-center data. However, sensitivity was 0.66-0.90 taking RT-PCR/radiologist opinion as ground truth. This work provides new insights on the usage of EDS with DL methods and the ability of algorithms to confidently predict COVID-Pneumonia while reinforcing the established learning; that benchmarking based on RT-PCR may not serve as reliable ground truth in radiological diagnosis. Such tools can pave the path for multi-modal high throughput detection of COVID-Pneumonia in screening and referral.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Deep Learning , Expert Systems , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Algorithms , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Incidence , India/epidemiology , Neural Networks, Computer , Pneumonia/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
17.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259732, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518359

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cell derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) are bioactive particles that evoke beneficial responses in recipient cells. We identified a role for MSC-EV in immune modulation and cellular salvage in a model of SARS-CoV-2 induced acute lung injury (ALI) using pulmonary epithelial cells and exposure to cytokines or the SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD). Whereas RBD or cytokine exposure caused a pro-inflammatory cellular environment and injurious signaling, impairing alveolar-capillary barrier function, and inducing cell death, MSC-EVs reduced inflammation and reestablished target cell health. Importantly, MSC-EV treatment increased active ACE2 surface protein compared to RBD injury, identifying a previously unknown role for MSC-EV treatment in COVID-19 signaling and pathogenesis. The beneficial effect of MSC-EV treatment was confirmed in an LPS-induced rat model of ALI wherein MSC-EVs reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and respiratory dysfunction associated with disease. MSC-EV administration was dose-responsive, demonstrating a large effective dose range for clinical translation. These data provide direct evidence of an MSC-EV-mediated improvement in ALI and contribute new insights into the therapeutic potential of MSC-EVs in COVID-19 or similar pathologies of respiratory distress.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/complications , Acute Lung Injury/virology , COVID-19/pathology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Extracellular Vesicles/ultrastructure , Humans , Immunomodulation , Male , Models, Biological , Pneumonia/pathology , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction , THP-1 Cells
18.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 1896762, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511530

ABSTRACT

The proposed method introduces algorithms for the preprocessing of normal, COVID-19, and pneumonia X-ray lung images which promote the accuracy of classification when compared with raw (unprocessed) X-ray lung images. Preprocessing of an image improves the quality of an image increasing the intersection over union scores in segmentation of lungs from the X-ray images. The authors have implemented an efficient preprocessing and classification technique for respiratory disease detection. In this proposed method, the histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) algorithm, Haar transform (Haar), and local binary pattern (LBP) algorithm were applied on lung X-ray images to extract the best features and segment the left lung and right lung. The segmentation of lungs from the X-ray can improve the accuracy of results in COVID-19 detection algorithms or any machine/deep learning techniques. The segmented lungs are validated over intersection over union scores to compare the algorithms. The preprocessed X-ray image results in better accuracy in classification for all three classes (normal/COVID-19/pneumonia) than unprocessed raw images. VGGNet, AlexNet, Resnet, and the proposed deep neural network were implemented for the classification of respiratory diseases. Among these architectures, the proposed deep neural network outperformed the other models with better classification accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Algorithms , Deep Learning , Expert Systems , Humans , Machine Learning , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , X-Rays
19.
Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob ; 20(1): 69, 2021 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438275

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 causes COVID-19 illness which can progress to severe pneumonia. Empiric antibacterials are often employed though frequency of bacterial coinfection superinfection is debated and concerns raised about selection of bacterial antimicrobial resistance. We evaluated sputum bacterial and fungal growth from 165 intubated COVID-19 pneumonia patients. Objectives were to determine frequency of culture positivity, risk factors for and outcomes of positive cultures, and timing of antimicrobial resistance development. METHODS: Retrospective reviews were conducted of COVID-19 pneumonia patients requiring intubation admitted to a 1058-bed four community hospital system on the east coast United States, March 1 to May 1, 2020. Length of stay (LOS) was expressed as mean (standard deviation); 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was computed for overall mortality rate using the exact binomial method, and overall mortality was compared across each level of a potential risk factor using a Chi-Square Test of Independence. All tests were two-sided, and significance level was set to 0.05. RESULTS: Average patient age was 68.7 years and LOS 19.9 days. Eighty-three patients (50.3% of total) originated from home, 10 from group homes (6.1% of total), and 72 from nursing facilities (43.6% of total). Mortality was 62.4%, highest for nursing home residents (80.6%). Findings from 253 sputum cultures overall did not suggest acute bacterial or fungal infection in 73 (45%) of 165 individuals sampled within 24 h of intubation. Cultures ≥ 1 week following intubation did grow potential pathogens in 72 (64.9%) of 111 cases with 70.8% consistent with late pneumonia and 29.2% suggesting colonization. Twelve (10.8% of total) of these late post-intubation cultures revealed worsened antimicrobial resistance predominantly in Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, or Staphylococcus aureus. CONCLUSIONS: In severe COVID-19 pneumonia, a radiographic ground glass interstitial pattern and lack of purulent sputum prior to/around the time of intubation correlated with no culture growth or recovery of normal oral flora ± yeast. Discontinuation of empiric antibacterials should be considered in these patients aided by other clinical findings, history of prior antimicrobials, laboratory testing, and overall clinical course. Continuing longterm hospitalisation and antibiotics are associated with sputum cultures reflective of hospital-acquired microbes and increasing antimicrobial resistance. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Not applicable as this was a retrospective chart review study without interventional arm.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/drug effects , Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cross Infection/complications , Fungi/drug effects , Mycoses/complications , Pneumonia/therapy , Sputum/microbiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Cross Infection/drug therapy , Cross Infection/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Fungal , Female , Fungi/genetics , Fungi/isolation & purification , Hospitalization , Humans , Intubation , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Mycoses/microbiology , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/mortality , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
20.
Respir Med ; 188: 106619, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415764

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Invasive fungal infections (IFI) are increasing in prevalence in recent years. In the last few months, the rise of COVID-19 patients has generated a new escalation in patients presenting opportunistic mycoses, mainly by Aspergillus. Candida infections are not being reported yet. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the prevalence of systemic candidiasis in patients admitted to ICUs due to severe pneumonia secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection and the existence of possible associated risk factors that led these patients to develop candidiasis. PATIENTS/METHODS: We designed a study including patients with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. RESULTS: The prevalence of systemic candidiasis was 14.4%, and the main isolated species were C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. All patients that were tested positive for Candida spp. stayed longer in the ICU in comparison to patients who tested negative. Patients with candidiasis had higher MuLBSTA score and mortality rates and a worse radiological involvement. In our study, Candida spp. isolates were found in patients that were submitted to: tocilizumab, tocilizumab plus systemic steroids, interferon type 1ß and Lopinavir-Ritonavir. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggested a high prevalence of systemic candidiasis in severe COVID-19-associated pneumonia patients. Patients with Candidiasis had the worst clinical outcomes. Treatment with tocilizumab could potentialize the risk to develop systemic candidiasis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Candidiasis/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Candida albicans , Candida parapsilosis , Candidiasis/complications , Candidiasis/diagnosis , Coinfection/diagnosis , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pneumonia/virology , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors
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