Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Aust J Rural Health ; 29(5): 753-767, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health and well-being of rural paramedics, police, community nursing and child protection staff. METHOD: An online survey was distributed to investigate the sources of stress and support across individual, task and organisational domains. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The survey was completed by 1542 paramedics, police, community nurses and child protection workers from all states and territories of Australia. This study describes the data for the 632 rural participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main measures of well-being were the Public Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), the Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD7), the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), workplace engagement, intention to quit and COVID-19-related stress. RESULTS: The mean depression and anxiety scores were 8.2 (PHQ9) and 6.8 (GAD7). This is 2-3 times that found in the general community. Over half (56.1%) of respondents showed high emotional exhaustion (burnout). The emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment mean scores were 28.5, 9.3 and 34.2, respectively. The strongest associations with burnout and psychological distress were workload, provision of practical support, training and organisational communication. A significant proportion of respondents were seriously considering quitting (27.4%) or looking for a new job with a different employer (28.5%) in the next 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has increased the workload and stress on rural front-line community staff. The major sources of stress were related to organisations' responses to COVID-19 and not COVID-19 per se. The data suggest the most effective mental health interventions are practical and preventive, such as firstly ensuring fair and reasonable workloads.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Police/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
2.
Indian J Med Ethics ; VI(1): 1-5, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257354

ABSTRACT

Violence against medical professionals and destruction of hospital property by frustrated patients and their relatives occur frequently in India (1) and in other countries (2, 3). However, harassment of healthcare workers by the police has, so far, not been an issue in the Indian healthcare system. Now, cases of harassment of medical professionals by the police have emerged during the Covid-19 pandemic. Ironically, both doctors and police personnel have been considered "frontline heroes" against the pandemic in India. We present some cases of such attacks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Patients/psychology , Police/psychology , Workplace Violence/psychology , Adult , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Police/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data
3.
Soc Work Public Health ; 36(4): 486-495, 2021 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201389

ABSTRACT

The present study aimed to determine the effect of burnout and stress levels on law enforcement officers' perceptions and behaviors to emphasize the need for adequate attention and care in these individuals during the COVID-19 outbreak. The research group of this cross-sectional study conducted in July-August 2020 was formed by the law enforcement officers. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Burnout Measure-Short Version (BM-SV) and a personal data form prepared by the researchers were used in the study. Data were analyzed using the IBM SPSS Statistics 16.0 software package program. The PSS scores were higher and significant in the group whose working hours were not increased due to the COVID-19 pandemic and they thought that there was a decrease in crime rates and did not need psychological support (p ≤ .05). The PSS scores were higher and significant in the group who took the warnings about COVID-19 into consideration, were afraid of contracting the virus, did not care about the progress of the epidemic and used the mask correctly. Additionally, the BM-SV scores were higher and significant in the group who stated that they were not afraid of contracting the virus (p ≤.05). A comprehensive crisis prevention and intervention system including epidemiological monitoring/observing, screening, referral and targeted interventions should be established to reduce the perceived level of stress and burnout in law enforcement and prevent further mental health problems.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Police/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
4.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 37(3): 192-197, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-380908

ABSTRACT

In response to the global pandemic COVID-19, the Irish government has called upon the Garda Síochána to implement an unparalleled mode of policing to mitigate and contain the spread of the Coronavirus. Studies investigating smaller scale epidemics, such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), indicate that staff at the frontlines of an outbreak are exposed to an insuperable amount of stress and experience increased psychological morbidities as a result. Furthermore, research not only indicates that heighted levels of psychological distress are an occupational hazard associated with the law enforcement profession, but that members of the Garda Síochána feel their mental health needs are largely unmet by their organisation. Given the pandemic's propensity to expose officers to indeterminate echelons of physical and psychological threat; there has never been a more appropriate time to explore the potential burdens associated with 'policing' a pandemic, question the governments capacity to address the psychological support needs of frontline professionals, and plan future research for best practice.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Harm Reduction , Law Enforcement/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Police/psychology , COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Ireland , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL