Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 63
Filter
1.
PLoS Genet ; 18(4): e1010113, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817364

ABSTRACT

The study aims to determine the shared genetic architecture between COVID-19 severity with existing medical conditions using electronic health record (EHR) data. We conducted a Phenome-Wide Association Study (PheWAS) of genetic variants associated with critical illness (n = 35) or hospitalization (n = 42) due to severe COVID-19 using genome-wide association summary data from the Host Genetics Initiative. PheWAS analysis was performed using genotype-phenotype data from the Veterans Affairs Million Veteran Program (MVP). Phenotypes were defined by International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes mapped to clinically relevant groups using published PheWAS methods. Among 658,582 Veterans, variants associated with severe COVID-19 were tested for association across 1,559 phenotypes. Variants at the ABO locus (rs495828, rs505922) associated with the largest number of phenotypes (nrs495828 = 53 and nrs505922 = 59); strongest association with venous embolism, odds ratio (ORrs495828 1.33 (p = 1.32 x 10-199), and thrombosis ORrs505922 1.33, p = 2.2 x10-265. Among 67 respiratory conditions tested, 11 had significant associations including MUC5B locus (rs35705950) with increased risk of idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis OR 2.83, p = 4.12 × 10-191; CRHR1 (rs61667602) associated with reduced risk of pulmonary fibrosis, OR 0.84, p = 2.26× 10-12. The TYK2 locus (rs11085727) associated with reduced risk for autoimmune conditions, e.g., psoriasis OR 0.88, p = 6.48 x10-23, lupus OR 0.84, p = 3.97 x 10-06. PheWAS stratified by ancestry demonstrated differences in genotype-phenotype associations. LMNA (rs581342) associated with neutropenia OR 1.29 p = 4.1 x 10-13 among Veterans of African and Hispanic ancestry but not European. Overall, we observed a shared genetic architecture between COVID-19 severity and conditions related to underlying risk factors for severe and poor COVID-19 outcomes. Differing associations between genotype-phenotype across ancestries may inform heterogenous outcomes observed with COVID-19. Divergent associations between risk for severe COVID-19 with autoimmune inflammatory conditions both respiratory and non-respiratory highlights the shared pathways and fine balance of immune host response and autoimmunity and caution required when considering treatment targets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Veterans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Association Studies , Genome-Wide Association Study/methods , Humans , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics
2.
Nat Genet ; 54(4): 374-381, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784001

ABSTRACT

Multiple COVID-19 genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified reproducible genetic associations indicating that there is a genetic component to susceptibility and severity risk. To complement these studies, we collected deep coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) phenotype data from a survey of 736,723 AncestryDNA research participants. With these data, we defined eight phenotypes related to COVID-19 outcomes: four phenotypes that align with previously studied COVID-19 definitions and four 'expanded' phenotypes that focus on susceptibility given exposure, mild clinical manifestations and an aggregate score of symptom severity. We performed a replication analysis of 12 previously reported COVID-19 genetic associations with all eight phenotypes in a trans-ancestry meta-analysis of AncestryDNA research participants. In this analysis, we show distinct patterns of association at the 12 loci with the eight outcomes that we assessed. We also performed a genome-wide discovery analysis of all eight phenotypes, which did not yield new genome-wide significant loci but did suggest that three of the four 'expanded' COVID-19 phenotypes have enhanced power to capture protective genetic associations relative to the previously studied phenotypes. Thus, we conclude that continued large-scale ascertainment of deep COVID-19 phenotype data would likely represent a boon for COVID-19 therapeutic target identification.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genome-Wide Association Study , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Phenotype , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics
4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 112, 2022 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773956

ABSTRACT

Critical coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with high mortality and potential genetic factors have been reported to be involved in the development of critical COVID-19. We performed a genome-wide association study to identify the genetic factors responsible for developing critical COVID-19. 632 critical patients with COVID-19 and 3021 healthy controls from the Chinese population were recruited. First, we identified a genome-wide significant difference of IL-6 rs2069837 (p = 9.73 × 10-15, OR = 0.41) between 437 critical patients with COVID-19 and 2551 normal controls in the discovery cohort. When replicated these findings in a set of 195 patients with critical COVID-19 and 470 healthy controls, we detected significant association of rs2069837 with COVID-19 (p = 8.89 × 10-3, OR = 0.67). This variant surpassed the formal threshold for genome-wide significance (combined p = 4.64 × 10-16, OR = 0.49). Further analysis revealed that there was a significantly stronger expression of IL-6 in the serum from patients with critical COVID-19 than in that from patients with asymptomatic COVID-19. An in vitro assay showed that the A to G allele changes in rs2069837 within IL-6 obviously decreased the luciferase expression activity. When analyzing the effect of this variant on the IL-6 in the serum based on the rs2069837 genotype, we found that the A to G variation in rs2069837 decreased the expression of IL-6, especially in the male. Overall, we identified a genetic variant in IL-6 that protects against critical conditions with COVID-19 though decreasing IL-6 expression in the serum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interleukin-6/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Male , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics
5.
J Interferon Cytokine Res ; 41(11): 407-414, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758604

ABSTRACT

Genetic polymorphisms at the IFNL4 loci are known to influence the clinical outcome of several different infectious diseases. Best described is the association between the IFNL4 genotype and hepatitis C virus clearance. However, an influence of the IFNL4 genotype on the adaptive immune system was suggested by several studies but never investigated in humans. In this cross-sectional study, we have genotyped 201 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-positive participants for 3 IFNL4 polymorphisms (rs368234815, rs12979860, and rs117648444) and stratified them according to the IFNλ4 activity. Based on this stratification, we investigated the association between the IFNL4 genotype and the antibody as well as the CD8+ T cell response in the acute phase of the SARS-CoV-2 infection. We observed no differences in the genotype distribution compared with a Danish reference cohort or the 1,000 Genome Project, and we were not able to link the IFNL4 genotype to changes in either the antibody or CD8+ T cell responses of these patients.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Interleukins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adaptive Immunity/genetics , Adult , Aged , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Genotype , Humans , Interleukins/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Young Adult
6.
Front Immunol ; 13: 812940, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731774

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, affecting more than 219 countries and causing the death of more than 5 million people worldwide. The genetic background represents a factor that predisposes the way the host responds to SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this sense, genetic variants of ACE and ACE2 could explain the observed interindividual variability to COVID-19 outcomes. In order to improve the understanding of how genetic variants of ACE and ACE2 are involved in the severity of COVID-19, we included a total of 481 individuals who showed clinical manifestations of COVID-19 and were diagnosed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and saliva samples. ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism was evaluated by the high-resolution melting method; ACE single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs4344) and ACE2 SNPs (rs2285666 and rs2074192) were genotyped using TaqMan probes. We assessed the association of ACE and ACE2 polymorphisms with disease severity using logistic regression analysis adjusted by age, sex, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. The severity of the illness in our study population was divided as 31% mild, 26% severe, and 43% critical illness; additionally, 18% of individuals died, of whom 54% were male. Our results showed in the codominant model a contribution of ACE2 gene rs2285666 T/T genotype to critical outcome [odds ratio (OR) = 1.83; 95%CI = 1.01-3.29; p = 0.04] and to require oxygen supplementation (OR = 1.76; 95%CI = 1.01-3.04; p = 0.04), in addition to a strong association of the T allele of this variant to develop critical illness in male individuals (OR = 1.81; 95%CI = 1.10-2.98; p = 0.02). We suggest that the T allele of rs2285666 represents a risk factor for severe and critical outcomes of COVID-19, especially for men, regardless of age, hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Alleles , COVID-19/virology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , Genotype , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
7.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1502-1512, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718395

ABSTRACT

The present coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly and existing data has suggested a number of susceptibility factors for developing a severe course of the disease.  The current case-control experiment is aimed to study the associations of genetic polymorphisms in tumor necrosis factors (TNFs) with COVID-19 and its mortality rate. A total of 550 participants (275 subjects and 275 controls) were enrolled. The tetra-amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction technique was recruited to detect -308G>A TNFα and +252A>G TNFß polymorphisms among the Iranian subjects. We demonstrated that carriers of the G allele of TNFß-252A/G, rs909253 A>G were more frequent in COVID-19 subjects compared to the healthy group and this allele statistically increased the disease risk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23-1.96, p < 0.0001). At the same time, the A allele of TNFα-311A/G, rs1800629 G>A moderately decreased the risk of COVID-19 (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.53-0.86, p < 0.002). Also, we analyzed the various genotypes regarding the para-clinical and disorder severity; we found that in the AA genotype of TNFß-252A/G (rs909253 A>G), the computed tomography scan pattern was different in comparison to cases carrying the AG genotype with p1 < 0.001. In addition, in the severe cases of COVID-19, leukocyte and neutrophil count and duration of intensive care unit hospitalization in the deceased patients were significantly increased (p < 0.001). Moreover, the TNFα-311A/G (rs1800629 G>A) variant is likely to change the pattern of splicing factor sites. Our findings provided deep insights into the relationship between TNFα/TNFß polymorphisms and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Replicated studies may give scientific evidence for exploring molecular mechanisms of COVID-19 in other ethnicities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Lymphotoxin-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Adult , Aged , Alleles , Case-Control Studies , Computer Simulation , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics
8.
Am J Hum Genet ; 109(3): 471-485, 2022 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1679508

ABSTRACT

Humans exhibit remarkable interindividual and interpopulation immune response variability upon microbial challenges. Cytokines play a vital role in regulating inflammation and immune responses, but dysregulation of cytokine responses has been implicated in different disease states. Host genetic factors were previously shown to significantly impact cytokine response heterogeneity mainly in European-based studies, but it is unclear whether these findings are transferable to non-European individuals. Here, we aimed to identify genetic variants modulating cytokine responses in healthy adults of East African ancestry from Tanzania. We leveraged both cytokine and genetic data and performed genome-wide cytokine quantitative trait loci (cQTLs) mapping. The results were compared with another cohort of healthy adults of Western European ancestry via direct overlap and functional enrichment analyses. We also performed meta-analyses to identify cQTLs with congruent effect direction in both populations. In the Tanzanians, cQTL mapping identified 80 independent suggestive loci and one genome-wide significant locus (TBC1D22A) at chromosome 22; SNP rs12169244 was associated with IL-1b release after Salmonella enteritidis stimulation. Remarkably, the identified cQTLs varied significantly when compared to the European cohort, and there was a very limited percentage of overlap (1.6% to 1.9%). We further observed ancestry-specific pathways regulating induced cytokine responses, and there was significant enrichment of the interferon pathway specifically in the Tanzanians. Furthermore, contrary to the Europeans, genetic variants in the TLR10-TLR1-TLR6 locus showed no effect on cytokine response. Our data reveal both ancestry-specific effects of genetic variants and pathways on cytokine response heterogeneity, hence arguing for the importance of initiatives to include diverse populations into genomics research.


Subject(s)
Genome-Wide Association Study , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Adult , Cytokines/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genomics , Humans , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Tanzania
9.
Cytokine ; 143: 155525, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1628419

ABSTRACT

Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is a crucial cytokine in host immune response to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study aimed to determine whether a functional polymorphism +874T/A in IFN-γ gene linked to high and low producer phenotypes [IFN-γ (+874Thigh â†’ Alow)] may alter the outcomes of chronic HBV infection in Tunisian population. The +874T/A was analysed by ARMS-PCR method in the group of 200 patients chronically infected with HBV and 200 healthy controls. We observed that minor +874A allele, minor +874AA and +874TA genotypes were significantly more frequent in the chronic hepatitis B group in comparison to the control group [49 vs. 31%, P < 10-4; 24 vs. 13%, P < 10-4; 52 vs. 38%, P < 10-4; respectively]. Besides, they were associated with susceptibility to hepatitis B infection [OR = 2.15, 3.87 and 2.84, respectively]. The minor +874A allele and +874AA genotype were statistically more representative in the sub-group of patients with high viral DNA load when compared with the sub-group of patients with low HBV DNA load [(57% vs. 43%, P = 0.003, OR = 1.79); (33% vs. 14%, P = 0.003, OR = 3.59), respectively]. Collectively, our study suggests an association between the IFN-γ +874T/A SNP and persistence of HBV by the enhancement of HBV DNA replication.


Subject(s)
DNA Replication , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Hepatitis B virus/physiology , Hepatitis B, Chronic/genetics , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Virus Replication/physiology , Adult , Alleles , Case-Control Studies , DNA, Viral/genetics , Female , Gene Frequency/genetics , Hepatitis B, Chronic/virology , Humans , Male , Viral Load/genetics
10.
Metabolism ; 129: 155156, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654927

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Both obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are reported to be highly enriched in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Due to the close correlation between obesity and T2D, it is important to examine whether obesity and T2D are independently related to COVID-19 hospitalization. OBJECTIVE: To examine the causal effect of obesity and T2D in hospitalized COVID-19 patients using Mendelian randomization (MR). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This two-sample MR analysis applied genetic markers of obesity identified in the genome wide association study (GWAS) by the GIANT Consortium as instrumental variables (IVs) of obesity; and genetic markers of T2D identified by the DIAGRAM Consortium as IVs of T2D. The MR analysis was performed in hospitalized COVID-19 patient by the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative using the MR-Base platform. RESULTS: All 3 classes of obesity (Class 1/2/3) were shown as the causal risk factors of COVID-19 hospitalization; however, T2D doesn't increase the risk of hospitalization or critically ill COVID-19 as an independent factor. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity, but not T2D, is a primary risk factor of COVID-19 hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Obesity/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/therapy , Causality , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Obesity/classification , Obesity/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 767726, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639598

ABSTRACT

Infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), causing the rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has generated a public health crisis worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection and virus-host interactions are still unclear. In this study, we identified four unique microRNA-like small RNAs encoded by SARS-CoV-2. SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-1-3p and SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-2-5p play an important role in evasion of type I interferon response through targeting several genes in type I interferon signaling pathway. Particularly worth mentioning is that highly expressed SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-2-5p inhibits some key genes in the host innate immune response, such as IRF7, IRF9, STAT2, OAS1, and OAS2. SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-2-5p has also been found to mediate allelic differential expression of COVID-19-susceptible gene OAS1. In conclusion, these results suggest that SARS-CoV-2 uses its miRNAs to evade the type I interferon response and links the functional viral sequence to the susceptible genetic background of the host.


Subject(s)
Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Immune Evasion/genetics , Interferon Type I/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Line , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Interferon-Stimulated Gene Factor 3, gamma Subunit/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , STAT2 Transcription Factor/genetics
12.
Nat Genet ; 54(2): 121-124, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637651

ABSTRACT

Using online surveys, we collected data regarding COVID-19-related loss of smell or taste from 69,841 individuals. We performed a multi-ancestry genome-wide association study and identified a genome-wide significant locus in the vicinity of the UGT2A1 and UGT2A2 genes. Both genes are expressed in the olfactory epithelium and play a role in metabolizing odorants. These findings provide a genetic link to the biological mechanisms underlying COVID-19-related loss of smell or taste.


Subject(s)
Ageusia/genetics , Anosmia/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Loci , Genome-Wide Association Study , Glucuronosyltransferase/genetics , /genetics , Adult , Aged , Ageusia/enzymology , Anosmia/enzymology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Phenotype , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Sample Size
13.
OMICS ; 26(1): 35-50, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635804

ABSTRACT

Pharmacogenomics is universally relevant for worldwide modern therapeutics and yet needs further development in resource-limited countries. While there is an abundance of genetic association studies in controlled medical settings, there is a paucity of studies with a naturalistic design in real-life clinical practice in patients with comorbidities and under multiple drug treatment regimens. African patients are often burdened with communicable and noncommunicable comorbidities, yet the application of pharmacogenomics in African clinical settings remains limited. Using warfarin as a model, this study aims at minimizing gaps in precision/personalized medicine research in African clinical practice. We present, therefore, pharmacogenomic profiles of a cohort of 503 black Africans (n = 252) and Mixed Ancestry (n = 251) patients from Southern Africa, on warfarin and co-prescribed drugs in a naturalized noncontrolled environment. Seventy-three (n = 73) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 pharmacogenes were characterized using a combination of allelic discrimination, Sanger sequencing, restriction fragment length polymorphism, and Sequenom Mass Array. The common comorbidities were hypertension (43-46%), heart failure (39-45%), diabetes mellitus (18%), arrhythmia (25%), and HIV infection (15%). Accordingly, the most common co-prescribed drugs were antihypertensives, antiarrhythmic drugs, antidiabetics, and antiretroviral therapy. We observed marked variation in major pharmacogenes both at interethnic levels and within African subpopulations. The Mixed Ancestry group presented a profile of genetic variants reflecting their European, Asian, and African admixture. Precision medicine requires that African populations begin to capture their own pharmacogenetic SNPs as they cannot always infer with absolute certainty from Asian and European populations. In the current historical moment of the COVID-19 pandemic, we also underscore that the spectrum of drugs interacting with warfarin will likely increase, given the systemic and cardiovascular effects of COVID-19, and the anticipated influx of COVID-19 medicines in the near future. This observational clinical pharmacogenomics study of warfarin, together with past precision medicine research, collectively, lends strong support for incorporation of pharmacogenetic profiling in clinical settings in African patients for effective and safe administration of therapeutics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Humans , Pandemics , Pharmacogenetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Precision Medicine , SARS-CoV-2 , Warfarin/therapeutic use
14.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0260897, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), can manifest with varying disease severity and mortality. Genetic predisposition influences the clinical course of infectious diseases. We investigated whether genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes ACE2, TIRAP, and factor X are associated with clinical outcomes in COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a single-centre retrospective cohort study. All patients who visited the emergency department with SARS-CoV-2 infection proven by polymerase chain reaction were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in ACE2 (rs2285666), TIRAP (rs8177374) and factor X (rs3211783) were assessed. The outcomes were mortality, respiratory failure and venous thromboembolism. Respiratory failure was defined as the necessity of >5 litres/minute oxygen, high flow nasal oxygen suppletion or mechanical ventilation. RESULTS: Between March and April 2020, 116 patients (35% female, median age 65 [inter quartile range 55-75] years) were included and treated according to the then applicable guidelines. Sixteen patients (14%) died, 44 patients (38%) had respiratory failure of whom 23 required endotracheal intubation for mechanical ventilation, and 20 patients (17%) developed venous thromboembolism. The percentage of TIRAP polymorphism carriers in the survivor group was 28% as compared to 0% in the non-survivor group (p = 0.01, Bonferroni corrected p = 0.02). Genotype distribution of ACE2 and factor X did not differ between survivors and non-survivors. CONCLUSION: This study shows that carriage of TIRAP polymorphism rs8177374 could be associated with a significantly lower mortality in COVID-19. This TIRAP polymorphism may be an important predictor in the outcome of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-1/genetics , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Factor X/genetics , Factor X/metabolism , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Genotype , Humans , Male , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Middle Aged , Netherlands/epidemiology , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-1/metabolism , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
15.
EBioMedicine ; 74: 103695, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596202

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The heterogeneity in symptomatology and phenotypic profile attributable to COVID-19 is widely unknown. The objective of this manuscript is to conduct a trans-ancestry genome wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of COVID-19 severity to improve the understanding of potentially causal targets for SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: This cross-sectional study recruited 646 participants in the UAE that were divided into two phenotypic groups based on the severity of COVID-19 phenotypes, hospitalized (n=482) and non-hospitalized (n=164) participants. Hospitalized participants were COVID-19 patients that developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia or progression to respiratory failure that required supplemental oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilation support or had severe complications such as septic shock or multi-organ failure. We conducted a trans-ancestry meta-analysis GWAS of European (n=302), American (n=102), South Asian (n=99), and East Asian (n=107) ancestry populations. We also carried out comprehensive post-GWAS analysis, including enrichment of SNP associations in tissues and cell-types, expression quantitative trait loci and differential expression analysis. FINDINGS: Eight genes demonstrated a strong association signal: VWA8 gene in locus 13p14·11 (SNP rs10507497; p=9·54 x10-7), PDE8B gene in locus 5q13·3 (SNP rs7715119; p=2·19 x10-6), CTSC gene in locus 11q14·2 (rs72953026; p=2·38 x10-6), THSD7B gene in locus 2q22·1 (rs7605851; p=3·07x10-6), STK39 gene in locus 2q24·3 (rs7595310; p=4·55 x10-6), FBXO34 gene in locus 14q22·3 (rs10140801; p=8·26 x10-6), RPL6P27 gene in locus 18p11·31 (rs11659676; p=8·88 x10-6), and METTL21C gene in locus 13q33·1 (rs599976; p=8·95 x10-6). The genes are expressed in the lung, associated to tumour progression, emphysema, airway obstruction, and surface tension within the lung, as well as an association to T-cell-mediated inflammation and the production of inflammatory cytokines. INTERPRETATION: We have discovered eight highly plausible genetic association with hospitalized cases in COVID-19. Further studies must be conducted on worldwide population genetics to facilitate the development of population specific therapeutics to mitigate this worldwide challenge. FUNDING: This review was commissioned as part of a project to study the host cell receptors of coronaviruses funded by Khalifa University's CPRA grant (Reference number 2020-004).


Subject(s)
Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics , Quantitative Trait, Heritable , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Genome-Wide Association Study , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Population Groups/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Treatment Outcome , United Arab Emirates , Young Adult
16.
Cell Rep ; 38(2): 110205, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588142

ABSTRACT

Spontaneous mutations introduce uncertainty into coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) control procedures and vaccine development. Here, we perform a spatiotemporal analysis on intra-host single-nucleotide variants (iSNVs) in 402 clinical samples from 170 affected individuals, which reveals an increase in genetic diversity over time after symptom onset in individuals. Nonsynonymous mutations are overrepresented in the pool of iSNVs but underrepresented at the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level, suggesting a two-step fitness selection process: a large number of nonsynonymous substitutions are generated in the host (positive selection), and these substitutions tend to be unfixed as SNPs in the population (negative selection). Dynamic iSNV changes in subpopulations with different gender, age, illness severity, and viral shedding time displayed a varied fitness selection process among populations. Our study highlights that iSNVs provide a mutational pool shaping the rapid global evolution of the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation/genetics , Phylogeny , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Young Adult
17.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6525-6534, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544299

ABSTRACT

By analyzing newly collected SARS-CoV-2 genomes and comparing them with our previous study about SARS-CoV-2 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) before June 2020, we found that the SNV clustering had changed remarkably since June 2020. Apart from that the group of SNVs became dominant, which is represented by two nonsynonymous mutations A23403G (S:D614G) and C14408T (ORF1ab:P4715L), a few emerging groups of SNVs were recognized with sharply increased monthly incidence ratios of up to 70% in November 2020. Further investigation revealed sets of SNVs specific to patients' ages and/or gender, or strongly associated with mortality. Our logistic regression model explored features contributing to mortality status, including three critical SNVs, G25088T(S:V1176F), T27484C (ORF7a:L31L), and T25A (upstream of ORF1ab), ages above 40 years old, and the male gender. The protein structure analysis indicated that the emerging subgroups of nonsynonymous SNVs and the mortality-related ones were located on the protein surface area. The clashes in protein structure introduced by these mutations might in turn affect the viral pathogenesis through the alteration of protein conformation, leading to a difference in transmission and virulence. Particularly, we explored the fact that nonsynonymous SNVs tended to occur in intrinsic disordered regions of Spike and ORF1ab to significantly increase hydrophobicity, suggesting a potential role in the change of protein folding related to immune evasion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Genome, Viral/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation , Polyproteins/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics , Virulence/genetics , Young Adult
18.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6653-6659, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530185

ABSTRACT

Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the pentraxin 3 (PTX3) gene polymorphisms rs2305619 (281A/G) and rs1840680 (1449A/G) and the development of MAS in patients with COVID-19. The study included a total of 94 patients aged 18-45 who were diagnosed as having COVID-19 between June and December 2020. PTX3 281A/G and 1449A/G polymorphism frequencies were evaluated. PTX3 281A/G allele and genotype frequencies did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg (HW) equilibrium in the MAS or non-MAS group (χ2 : 0.049, df: 2, p = 0.976, χ2 : 0.430, df: 2, p = 0.806). PTX3 1449A/G allele and genotype frequencies deviated significantly from HW equilibrium in the non-MAS group (χ2 : 6.794, df: 2, p = 0.033) but not in the MAS group (χ2 : 2.256, df: 2, p = 0.324). The AG genotype was significantly more frequent in the non-MAS group, while the AA genotype was significantly more frequent in the MAS group (χ2 : 11.099, df: 2, p= 0.004). Analysis of the PTX3 1449A/G polymorphism showed that individuals with the GG genotype had higher serum PTX3 levels than those with the AA and AG genotypes (p = 0.001 for both). Analysis of the PTX3 1449A/G polymorphism in patients with COVID-19 showed that those with the AG genotype were relatively more protected from MAS compared with individuals with the AA genotype. In addition, lower serum PTX3 levels are observed in patients carrying the A allele.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Serum Amyloid P-Component/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Alleles , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Progression , Female , Genotype , Humans , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/etiology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
19.
Cell Rep ; 37(7): 110020, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509641

ABSTRACT

Variability in SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility and COVID-19 disease severity between individuals is partly due to genetic factors. Here, we identify 4 genomic loci with suggestive associations for SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility and 19 for COVID-19 disease severity. Four of these 23 loci likely have an ethnicity-specific component. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals in 11 loci colocalize with expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) associated with the expression of 20 genes in 62 tissues/cell types (range: 1:43 tissues/gene), including lung, brain, heart, muscle, and skin as well as the digestive system and immune system. We perform genetic fine mapping to compute 99% credible SNP sets, which identify 10 GWAS loci that have eight or fewer SNPs in the credible set, including three loci with one single likely causal SNP. Our study suggests that the diverse symptoms and disease severity of COVID-19 observed between individuals is associated with variants across the genome, affecting gene expression levels in a wide variety of tissue types.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Chromosome Mapping/methods , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study/methods , Humans , Organ Specificity/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Transcriptome/genetics
20.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463840

ABSTRACT

The emergence of variants of SARS-CoV-2 has created challenges for the testing infrastructure. Although large-scale genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 has facilitated hospital and public health responses, access to sequencing facilities globally is variable and turnaround times can be significant, so there is a requirement for rapid and cost-effective alternatives. Applying a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approach enables rapid (<4 h) identification of SARS-CoV-2 lineages from nucleic acid extracts, through the presence or absence of a panel of defined of genomic polymorphisms. For example, the B.1.1.7 lineage ("UK", "Alpha", or "Kent" variant) is characterised by 23 mutations compared to the reference strain, and the most biologically significant of these are found in the S gene. We have developed a SARS-CoV-2 typing assay focused on five positions in the S gene (HV69/70, N501, K417, E484 and P681). This configuration can identify a range of variants, including all the "Variants of Concern" currently designated by national and international public health bodies. The panel has been evaluated using a range of clinical isolates and standardised control materials at four UK hospitals and shows excellent concordance with the known lineage information derived from full sequence analysis. The assay has a turnaround time of about three hours for a set of up to 24 samples and has been utilised to identify emerging variants in a clinical setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Whole Genome Sequencing/methods
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL