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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242335

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic had several negative impacts on child and adolescent victims of domestic violence, especially on those who lived in the residential foster care system. The main goal of the present study was to understand these negative impacts through the perspectives of professionals in Portuguese residential foster care structures using both individual interviews and an online survey. One hundred and three professionals aged between 22 and 64 years (M = 38.39; SD = 8.34) participated in the online survey (86 females and 17 males). Of those, seven professionals, four females and three males aged between 29 and 49 years (M = 38.43, SD = 7.50), were also interviewed. According to the participants, the conditions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic contributed adversely not only to the increase in domestic violence against children and adolescents but also to the aggravation of the conditions children and adolescents living in the Portuguese residential foster care system were exposed to, namely concerning family relationships, access to resources and services, and institutional dynamics. The results suggest the necessity to develop standard procedures to cope with pandemic situations in the residential foster care system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Domestic Violence , Male , Female , Humans , Adolescent , Child , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Portugal/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Foster Home Care
2.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285899, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2020, Portugal had high levels of unmet health care needs. Primary Care was reported as the main source of unmet needs. OBJECTIVES: To describe face-to-face and remote access to GPs in Portugal during the COVID-19 pandemic. To discover patient experiences and attitudes to access to care. To identify determinants of access to care. METHODS: A survey of a random sample of 4,286 adults registered in a group of Family Practices was conducted in 2021. Paper questionnaires were sent by post to patients who had no e-mail address registered with the practice. Patients with an e-mail address were sent a link to an online questionnaire. Outcomes were reported waiting times for face-to-face and remote contacts with GPs, dichotomized to ascertain compliance with standards. Associations between participant characteristics and outcome variables were tested using logistic regression. RESULTS: Waiting times for face-to-face consultations with GPs during the pandemic often exceeded the maximum waiting times (MWT) set by the National Health Service. Remote contacts were mostly conducted within acceptable standards. Waiting times for speaking with the GP over the phone were rated as 'poor' by 40% and 27% reported requests for these calls as unmet. The odds of getting care over MWT increased for participants who reported poorer digital skills. Participants were less likely to get non-urgent consultations over MWT if they found it easy to use the online patient portal to book appointments (odds ratio 0.24; 99% confidence intervals 0.09-0.61), request prescriptions (0.18; 0.04-0.74) or insert personal data (0.18; 0.04-0.95). CONCLUSION: Patient reported access to GPs during the pandemic was uneven in Portugal. Obtaining non-urgent consultations and remote contacts over MWT affected mainly those patients with poor digital skills. Telephone access to GPs received the worse ratings. Access through traditional pathways must remain available, to prevent the widening of inequities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practitioners , Adult , Humans , Portugal , Pandemics , State Medicine , Patient Outcome Assessment
3.
Cien Saude Colet ; 28(5): 1297-1312, 2023 May.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2321883

ABSTRACT

The uncertainties about COVID-19 require evaluating national responses to identify successes and failures in the pandemic control. This article analyzes Portugal´s response, particularly the contribution of its health and surveillance systems in dealing with the pandemic. An integrative literature review was conducted, including consultations of observatories, documents, and institutional websites. Portugal´s response was agile and showed unified technical and political coordination, including surveillance structure using telemedicine. The reopening was supported by high testing and low positivity rates and strict rules. However, the relaxation of measures as of November/2020 resulted in an increase in cases, collapsing the health system. The response involved a consistent surveillance strategy with innovative monitoring tools, which, combined with high population adherence to vaccination, led to overcoming that moment and kept hospitalization and death rates at new disease waves at low levels. Thus, the Portuguese case discloses the risks of disease resurgence with the flexibility of measures and the population´s exhaustion in the face of restrictive measures and new variants, but also the importance of articulation between technical coordination, the political sphere, and the scientific committee.


As incertezas sobre a COVID-19 requerem avaliação das respostas nacionais, visando identificar sucessos e fracassos no seu controle. Este artigo analisou a resposta portuguesa, particularmente a contribuição dos seus sistemas de saúde e de vigilância no enfrentamento à pandemia. Foi realizada uma revisão integrativa da literatura, sendo incluídas consultas a observatórios, documentos e sites institucionais. A resposta portuguesa foi ágil e revelou uma coordenação técnica e política unificada. Contou com estrutura de vigilância e uso de telemedicina. A reabertura foi amparada na alta testagem, baixa positividade e regras rígidas. Contudo, o relaxamento das medidas a partir de novembro/2020 resultou em aumento de casos com colapso do sistema de saúde. A resposta a esta situação envolveu estratégia de vigilância consistente, com instrumentos de monitoramento inovadores, que, aliados à alta adesão da população à vacinação, levaram à superação daquele momento e mantiveram baixos índices de hospitalizações e óbitos em novas ondas. Nesse sentido, o caso português evidenciou os riscos de recrudescimento com a flexibilização, a exaustão da população em relação a medidas restritivas e novas variantes, mas também a importância da articulação entre a coordenação técnica, a esfera política e o comitê científico.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Portugal/epidemiology , Vaccination Coverage , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vaccination
4.
J Epidemiol Community Health ; 76(4): 335-340, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314372

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the population's mental health. However, its impact on the consumption of anxiolytics, sedatives, hypnotics and antidepressants remains to be evaluated. Hence, this article aims to assess the prescription trends of these drugs in Portugal, from January 2018 to March 2021, while critically examining whether the COVID-19 pandemic had an impact on these prescription trends or not. METHODS: A nationwide interrupted time-series analysis of the prescription data of anxiolytics, sedatives, hypnotics and antidepressants in outpatient setting of the public health sector was conducted. The data encompassed the defined daily dose per month, age range and sex and were analysed following a segmented regression approach. RESULTS: The pandemic preceded an immediate reduction in the prescription of anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics for children and adolescents. However, an increasing trend throughout the pandemic has been noted in the prescription of these drugs, especially among adults aged 65 years or above. A drop in antidepressant prescription was observed as an immediate effect of the pandemic among male and female adolescents and elderly women. From March 2020 to March 2021, a decreasing prescription trend has been noted among men. CONCLUSIONS: When analysing specific genders and age ranges, differences can be noted, in terms of both immediate impact and prescribing trends throughout 1 year of the COVID-19 pandemic. The impact of the pandemic on mental health and its association with the consumption trends of psychoactive drugs, and with the access to mental health treatments, should be further assessed.


Subject(s)
Anti-Anxiety Agents , COVID-19 Drug Treatment , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anti-Anxiety Agents/therapeutic use , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Drug Prescriptions , Female , Humans , Hypnotics and Sedatives/therapeutic use , Male , Outpatients , Pandemics , Portugal/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Arch Soc Esp Oftalmol (Engl Ed) ; 98(6): 325-328, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316950

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study reports visual health during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2021 in Spain and Portugal, focusing on eye complaints and population habits. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cross-sectional survey through an online email invitation to patients attending ophthalmology clinics in Spain and Portugal from September to November 2021. Around 3833 participants offered valid anonymous responses in a questionnaire. RESULTS: Sixty percent of respondents identified significant discomfort related to dry eye symptoms for increased screen time and lens fogging using facemasks. 81.6% of the participants used digital devices for more than 3 h per day and 40% for more than 8 h. In addition, 44% of participants referred to worsening near vision. The most frequent ametropias were myopia (40.2%) and astigmatism (36.7%). Parents considered eyesight the most important aspect of their children (87.2%). CONCLUSIONS: The results show the challenges for eye practices during the initial COVID-19 pandemic. Focusing on signs and symptoms that lead to ophthalmologic conditions is an essential concern, especially in our digital society highly dependent on vision. At the same time, the excessive use of digital devices during this pandemic has aggravated dry eye and myopia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dry Eye Syndromes , Myopia , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Portugal/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Myopia/epidemiology
6.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285317, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316806

ABSTRACT

Throughout the pandemic of COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2, university students were considered a vulnerable risk group for mental health impairment and wellbeing deterioration. This study aimed at evaluating the pandemic's impact on the physical and mental health and wellbeing among students of a Portuguese university. This cross-sectional study included 913 participants and ran from June to October 2020. Data collected included sociodemographics, three mental health self-report questionnaires (Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire and Brief COPE) and lifestyle practices (eating and sleeping patterns, media, and entertainment habits) during the first months of the pandemic, which included a 72-day full national lockdown. Descriptive and correlational statistical analysis were conducted. Students' food habits changed during the pandemic, namely on the consumption of snacks and fast food and, overall, less balanced meals became more prevalent. Additionally, almost 70% of the students reported Body Mass Index changes, while 59% went through sleep pattern changes-these were more pronounced in women and younger students. Over half (67%) of the inquirees exhibited an increase in their stress, depression, and generalized anxiety symptoms. Also, the study demonstrates that students' lifestyles trended negatively during the pandemic and highlights how important regular psychological, health monitoring and emotional support is, amongst this somehow overlooked population throughout the pandemic. Universities should provide support to overcome challenges in future stressful situations. This study might have an impact on how universities and higher education systems approach their students in terms of mental and physical health monitoring and promotion in future situations, non-related with COVID. Moreover, it has a large sample of students well characterized in terms of mental and physical health, which might be of interest for future comparison with other worldwide group of students throughout stressful situations, such as tragic events, wars, pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics , Portugal/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Universities , Depression/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Anxiety/psychology , Students/psychology
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(9)2023 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313231

ABSTRACT

In its early stage, the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent public health measures brought several challenges to people in general, with adolescents being one of the most affected groups. To assess the psychological reactions of Portuguese adolescents in that early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted an online survey that was filled by a sample of 340 (67.6% female and 32.4% male) middle adolescents (aged 16 and 17 years). Using the Impact Event Scale-Revised and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale, we found that most participants reported a normal score for depression, anxiety, and stress. However, 47.1% reported some level of pandemic-related traumatic distress, and 25.6% reported high severity values. The girls' levels of depression, anxiety, stress, and traumatic distress were significantly higher than those of the boys. Regression models showed that gender, number of symptoms experienced in the past days, self-reported health status, and concern with family were significant predictors of these mental health indicators. Our findings underscore the need for future research on the long-term traumatic psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in adolescents, and on the gender differences in this group. This will allow the development of strategies to identify and address at-risk adolescents, since the promotion of mental health and the prevention of pathology are imperative for the health of current and future generations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Female , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Portugal/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299958

ABSTRACT

Inmates are highly exposed to mental and physical disorders. Therefore, periodic screening of their mental health and other health risks is required. This study aims to investigate the perceived fear of COVID-19 and the psychological impact of the pandemic in a sample of young adult male inmates. An institutional-based quantitative cross-sectional study design was performed. Data collection took place from July to September 2022 at a juvenile prison in the central region of Portugal. Data were collected using questionnaires on demographic and health characteristics; fear of COVID-19; depression, anxiety and stress levels; and resilient coping. The sample included 60 male inmates imprisoned for over 2 years. Stress was the most common symptom among inmates (75%), followed by anxiety (38.3%) and depression (36.7%). The mean score on the Fear of COVID-19 Scale was 17.38 ± 4.80, indicating relatively low fear levels. Low resilient scores were found in 38 participants (63.3%). Participants reported moderately high ranges of 3.62 ± 0.87 regarding mental health perception, 3.73 ± 0.95 for physical health perception, and 3.27 ± 0.82 for global health concerning the previous month. The Pearson correlation matrix indicated significant and moderate to strong correlations between fear of COVID-19 and mental health-related variables (p < 0.001). The predicting factors of fear of COVID-19 were identified by deploying a multiple linear regression model. We found four predictors: age, perception of mental health, and overall levels of anxiety and stress (R2 = 0.497). Fear of a given scenario or factor may shift with time. Therefore, long-term research is needed to evaluate whether fear of COVID-19 is adaptive or long-reactive in victims. Our study can assist policymakers, mental health and public health experts, and others in recognizing and managing pandemic-related fears and mental health symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Young Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Portugal/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Fear , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology
11.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0285051, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294311

ABSTRACT

Approximately 10% of patients experience symptoms of Post COVID-19 Condition (PCC) after a SARS-CoV-2 infection. Akin acute COVID-19, PCC may impact a multitude of organs and systems, such as the cardiovascular, respiratory, musculoskeletal, and neurological systems. The frequency and associated risk factors of PCC are still unclear among both community and hospital settings in individuals with a history of COVID-19. The LOCUS study was designed to clarify the PCC's burden and associated risk factors. LOCUS is a multi-component study that encompasses three complementary building blocks. The "Cardiovascular and respiratory events following COVID-19" component is set to estimate the incidence of cardiovascular and respiratory events after COVID-19 in eight Portuguese hospitals via electronic health records consultation. The "Physical and mental symptoms following COVID-19" component aims to address the community prevalence of self-reported PCC symptoms through a questionnaire-based approach. Finally, the "Treating and living with Post COVID-19 Condition" component will employ semi-structured interviews and focus groups to characterise reported experiences of using or working in healthcare and community services for the treatment of PCC symptoms. This multi-component study represents an innovative approach to exploring the health consequences of PCC. Its results are expected to provide a key contribution to the optimisation of healthcare services design.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Portugal/epidemiology , Risk Factors
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303027

ABSTRACT

Although several studies have described the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly on sleep quality, there are few studies that, in the same time period and using the same assessment tools, compare sleep quality and mental health status between nurses and the general population. Thus, the aim of this study was to (a) examine whether there were differences between nurses and the general population regarding sleep quality and mental health status during the COVID-19 pandemic and (b) identify which factors may explain sleep quality during the COVID-19 pandemic. To do that, we carried out a cross-sectional study in Portugal. Data were collected using an online survey platform during the first COVID-19 wave, from April to August 2020. Nurses presented poorer sleep quality than the general population, as well as higher anxiety levels. Irritability and worries about the future were two of the factors that might explain those differences. Thus, we can conclude that irritability and worries about the future are dimensions of anxiety that were associated with poor sleep quality during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, it would be important to adopt regular anxiety and sleep assessments, particularly for nurses, and to implement strategies to reduce this problem.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Humans , Sleep Quality , COVID-19/epidemiology , Portugal/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression
14.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284703, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291153

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence, distribution and trends of refractive error from ophthalmic lens manufacturing data over a ten-year period. METHODS: Fully anonymized data from ophthalmic lenses, for the years between 2010 and 2020, provided by the leading ophthalmic lens manufacturer operating in Portugal were analysed (no human participants were involved in the research). Prescriptions delivered were divided in single vision prescriptions and progressive/multifocal prescriptions and categorized into 14 spherical equivalent ranges. Given the lack of absolute values, indirect estimates and a qualitative analysis of the current situation and trends on refractive error epidemiology was carried out. RESULTS: Dataset from manufacturer comprises percentage values of ophthalmic lenses dispensed in Portugal. The distribution of ophthalmic prescriptions for single vision prescriptions presents most of the observations in the range [-1.49, -0.50] diopters, in every year from 2010 to 2020. For the progressive prescription's lenses, most of the observations is in an interval of two ranges, [0.50, 1.49] and [1.50, 2.99] diopters. From 2010 to 2020 the proportion of single vision ophthalmic lens prescriptions for myopia increased from 38.13% to 46.21%; the proportion for high myopia increased from 2.76% to 4.45%; and the proportion for hyperopia decreased from 40.85% to 31.36%. CONCLUSIONS: Ophthalmic lens manufacturing data can be a valuable source for long-term analysis of refractive error prescription and trends over time. It was possible to observe a trend of increasing prevalence of myopia and high myopia from 40.89% in 2010 to 50.66% in 2020. That increase trend has important implications for public health and in the planning of services.


Subject(s)
Myopia , Refractive Errors , Humans , Prevalence , Portugal/epidemiology , Refractive Errors/epidemiology , Refraction, Ocular
15.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(3)2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2256675

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: COVID-19, a disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, is a public health emergency. Data on the effect of the virus on pregnancy are limited. Materials and Methods: We carried out a retrospective descriptive study, in order to evaluate the obstetric results on pregnant women in which SARS-CoV-2 was detected through RT-PCR of the nasopharyngeal swab, at admission to the maternity hospital. Results: From 16 March to 31 July 2020, 12 SARS-CoV-2 positive pregnant women have been hospitalized. Eleven were hospitalized for initiation or induction of labor, corresponding to 0.64% of deliveries in the maternity hospital. One pregnant woman was hospitalized for threatened abortion, culminating in a stillbirth at 20 weeks of gestation. Regarding the severity of the disease, nine women were asymptomatic and three had mild illness (two had associated cough and one headache). Three had relevant environmental exposure and a history of contact with infected persons. None had severe or critical illness due to SARS-CoV-2. There were no maternal deaths. The following gestational complications were observed: one stillbirth, one preterm labor, one preterm prelabor rupture of membranes, and one fetal growth restriction. Four deliveries were eutocic, two vacuum-assisted deliveries and five were cesarean sections. The indications for cesarean section were obstetric. Conclusions: SARS-CoV-2 infection was found in a minority of hospitalized pregnant women in this sample. Most are asymptomatic or have mild illness, from gestational complications to highlight stillbirth and preterm birth. There were no cases of vertical transmission by coronavirus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cesarean Section , Cough/physiopathology , Female , Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology , Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture/epidemiology , Headache/physiopathology , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Maternity , Humans , Labor, Induced , Obstetric Labor, Premature/epidemiology , Portugal/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Stillbirth/epidemiology , Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical
17.
Matern Child Health J ; 26(9): 1779-1789, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285524

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 was declared as a pandemic on March 2020. Research on its psychological effects is still lacking. Perinatal depression is a medical complication of pregnancy, especially in situations of stress. In this study, we aimed to investigate the presence of symptoms of depression in pregnant women during the lockdown period in Portugal. METHODS: This study consisted in a cross-sectional study among Portuguese pregnant women, who completed an online self-report questionnaire between 25th April and 30th April 2020. An anonymous online questionnaire was developed to assess depression and concerns related to COVID-19. This study was approved by the IRB of Hospital Dona Estefânia and performed in accordance with the ethical standards laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki. Eligibility criteria included pregnant women, ≥ 18 years and living in Portugal. The primary outcome was to evaluate the presence of depressive symptoms and its association to socio-demographic characteristics and to concerns related to COVID-19. RESULTS: A total of 1698 pregnant women were enrolled. The mean age was 31.9 years. 82.4% felt a negative impact of the pandemic in the surveillance of pregnancy and 43% felt insufficient support. 26.3% showed "possible depression" according to the EPDS. A regression analysis revealed the possibility of depression increased as the concerns about COVID increased and was lower for women with support. The possibility of depression was higher for women with psychiatric medical history. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated a significant increase in clinically significant depressive symptoms in pregnant women during the lockdown. It also revealed some of the socio-demographic characteristics of women at risk for depression. If left untreated, depression tends to persist, affecting the woman and also the child. Our findings suggest that COVID-19 represents a serious challenge for this population and reinforce the urgent need for early detection and intervention on mental health issues during pregnancy, especially during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Portugal/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
18.
Vaccine ; 41(6): 1182-1189, 2023 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278521

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: Although usually benign, varicella can lead to serious complications and sometimes long-term sequelae. Vaccines are safe and effective but not yet included in immunisation programmes in many countries. We aimed to quantify the impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in terms of quality-adjusted life years (QALY) in children with varicella and their families, key to assessing cost-utility in countries with low mortality due to this infection. METHODS: Children with varicella in the community and admitted to hospitals in Portugal were included over 18 months from January 2019. Children's and carers' HRQoL losses were assessed prospectively using standard multi-attribute utility instruments for measuring HRQoL (EQ-5D and CHU9D), from presentation to recovery, allowing the calculation of QALYs. RESULTS: Among 109 families with children with varicella recruited from attendees at a pediatric emergency service (community arm), the mean HRQoL loss/child was 2.0 days (95 % CI 1.9-2.2, n = 101) (mean 5.4 QALYs/1000 children (95 % CI 5.3-6.1) and 1.3 days/primary carer (95 % CI 1.2-1.6, n = 103) (mean 3.6 QALYs /1000 carers (95 % CI 3.4-4.4). Among 114 families with children admitted to hospital because of severe varicella or a complication (hospital arm), the mean HRQoL loss/child was 9.8 days (95 % CI 9.4-10.6, n = 114) (mean 26.8 QALYs /1000 children (95 % CI 25.8-29.0) and 8.5 days/primary carer (95 % CI 7.4-9.6, n = 114) (mean 23.4 QALYs/1000 carers (95 % CI 20.3-26.2). Mean QALY losses/1000 patients were particularly high for bone and joint infections [67.5 (95 % CI 43.9-97.6)]. Estimates for children's QALYs lost using the CHU9D tool were well correlated with those obtained using EQ-5D, but substantially lower. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of varicella on HRQoL is substantial. We report the first measurements of QALYs lost in hospitalised children and in the families of children both in the community and admitted to hospital, providing important information to guide vaccination policy recommendations.


Subject(s)
Chickenpox , Quality of Life , Humans , Child , Quality-Adjusted Life Years , Prospective Studies , Chickenpox/epidemiology , Chickenpox/prevention & control , Portugal , Cost-Benefit Analysis
19.
Front Public Health ; 11: 963464, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278310

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In Portugal, COVID-19 laboratory notifications, clinical notifications (CNs), and epidemiological investigation questionnaires (EI) were electronically submitted by laboratories, clinicians, and public health professionals, respectively, to the Portuguese National Epidemiological Surveillance System (SINAVE), as mandated by law. We described CN and EI completeness in SINAVE to inform pandemic surveillance efforts. Methods: We calculated the proportion of COVID-19 laboratory-notified cases without CN nor EI, and without EI by region and age group, in each month, from March 2020 to July 2021. We tested the correlation between those proportions and monthly case counts in two epidemic periods and used Poisson regression to identify factors associated with the outcomes. Results: The analysis included 909,720 laboratory-notified cases. After October 2020, an increase in the number of COVID-19 cases was associated with a decrease in the submissions of CN and EI. By July 2021, 68.57% of cases had no associated CN nor EI, and 96.26% had no EI. Until January 2021, there was a positive correlation between monthly case counts and the monthly proportion of cases without CN nor EI and without EI, but not afterward. Cases aged 75 years or older had a lower proportion without CN nor EI (aRR: 0.842 CI95% 0.839-0.845). When compared to the Norte region, cases from Alentejo, Algarve, and Madeira had a lower probability of having no EI (aRR;0.659 CI 95%0.654-0.664; aRR 0.705 CI 95% 0.7-0.711; and aRR 0.363 CI 95% 0.354-0.373, respectively). Discussion: After January 2021, CN and EI were submitted in a small proportion of laboratory-confirmed cases, varying by age and region. Facing the large number of COVID-19 cases, public health services may have adopted other registry strategies including new surveillance and management tools to respond to operational needs. This may have contributed to the abandonment of official CN and EI submission. Useful knowledge on the context of infection, symptom profile, and other knowledge gaps was no longer adequately supported by SINAVE. Regular evaluation of pandemic surveillance systems' completeness is necessary to inform surveillance improvements and procedures considering dynamic objectives, usefulness, acceptability, and simplicity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Portugal/epidemiology , Laboratories , Pandemics , Registries
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(24)2022 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278087

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic brought many changes and challenges to health professionals, due to a lack of knowledge when dealing with the disease, fear of contagion, and the sequelae that characterize long COVID. To deal with this situation, respiratory rehabilitation programs are recommended in face-to-face and/or telerehabilitation modalities. (1) Background: This study had as its primary aim identifying the aspects/components to be considered in the planning and implementation of telerehabilitation interventions that guarantee transitional care for people with long COVID-19 after hospitalization and as a secondary aim identifying the positive aspects of telerehabilitation. (2) Methods: The method used to answer the research question was a focus group, carried out online with eight nurses specialized in rehabilitation nursing. The answers to the semi-structured interview were subjected to content analysis, and qualitative data analysis software (WebQDA®) was used to organize and analyze the findings. (3) Results: Four categories emerged from the content analysis: coordination between care levels; transitional care telerehabilitation intervention; advantages of telerehabilitation; and opportunities. (4) Conclusions: These findings make an important contribution to the reorganization of transitional care, allowing the identification of central aspects to be considered in the planning and implementation of telerehabilitation programs for people with long COVID.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Telerehabilitation , Transitional Care , Humans , Pandemics , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Portugal , Disease Progression , Perception
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