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1.
Br J Surg ; 108(12): 1448-1464, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239571

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine the impact of pulmonary complications on death after surgery both before and during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. METHODS: This was a patient-level, comparative analysis of two, international prospective cohort studies: one before the pandemic (January-October 2019) and the second during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic (local emergence of COVID-19 up to 19 April 2020). Both included patients undergoing elective resection of an intra-abdominal cancer with curative intent across five surgical oncology disciplines. Patient selection and rates of 30-day postoperative pulmonary complications were compared. The primary outcome was 30-day postoperative mortality. Mediation analysis using a natural-effects model was used to estimate the proportion of deaths during the pandemic attributable to SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: This study included 7402 patients from 50 countries; 3031 (40.9 per cent) underwent surgery before and 4371 (59.1 per cent) during the pandemic. Overall, 4.3 per cent (187 of 4371) developed postoperative SARS-CoV-2 in the pandemic cohort. The pulmonary complication rate was similar (7.1 per cent (216 of 3031) versus 6.3 per cent (274 of 4371); P = 0.158) but the mortality rate was significantly higher (0.7 per cent (20 of 3031) versus 2.0 per cent (87 of 4371); P < 0.001) among patients who had surgery during the pandemic. The adjusted odds of death were higher during than before the pandemic (odds ratio (OR) 2.72, 95 per cent c.i. 1.58 to 4.67; P < 0.001). In mediation analysis, 54.8 per cent of excess postoperative deaths during the pandemic were estimated to be attributable to SARS-CoV-2 (OR 1.73, 1.40 to 2.13; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Although providers may have selected patients with a lower risk profile for surgery during the pandemic, this did not mitigate the likelihood of death through SARS-CoV-2 infection. Care providers must act urgently to protect surgical patients from SARS-CoV-2 infection.


This study compared death rates in patients who developed pulmonary complications of surgery before and during the pandemic in two large, international studies. Patients who underwent surgery during the pandemic tended to be younger and fitter. Overall, 4.3 per cent were diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection after surgery in the pandemic cohort. Deaths within 30 days after surgery tripled during the first wave of the pandemic (from 0.7 to 2.0 per cent), whereas the rate of pulmonary complications remained the similar (7.1 to 6.3 per cent). Over half of these excess deaths (54.8 per cent) were estimated to be related to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Elective Surgical Procedures , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Abdominal Neoplasms/surgery , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
2.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 115(6): 1518-1519, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233535
3.
Crit Care ; 27(1): 215, 2023 05 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233061

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Cytokine adsorption using the CytoSorb® adsorber has been proposed in various clinical settings including sepsis, ARDS, hyperinflammatory syndromes, cardiac surgery or recovery after cardiac arrest. The aim of this analysis is to provide evidence for the efficacy of the CytoSorb® adsorber with regard to mortality in various settings. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library database and the database provided by Cytosorbents™ (01.1.2010-29.5.2022). We considered randomized controlled trials and observational studies with control groups. The longest reported mortality was defined as the primary endpoint. We computed risk ratios and 95%-confidence intervals and used DerSimonian and Lairds random effects model. We analysed all studies combined and divided them into the subgroups: sepsis, cardiopulmonary bypass surgery (CPB), other severe illness, SARS-CoV-2 infection and recovery from cardiac arrest. The meta-analysis was registered in advance (PROSPERO: CRD42022290334). RESULTS: Of an initial 1295 publications, 34 studies were found eligible, including 1297 patients treated with CytoSorb® and 1314 controls. Cytosorb® intervention did not lower mortality (RR [95%-CI]: all studies 1.07 [0.88; 1.31], sepsis 0.98 [0.74; 1.31], CPB surgery 0.91 [0.64; 1.29], severe illness 0.95 [0.59; 1.55], SARS-CoV-2 1.58 [0.50; 4.94]). In patients with cardiac arrest, we found a significant survival advantage of the untreated controls (1.22 [1.02; 1.46]). We did not find significant differences in ICU length of stay, lactate levels, or IL-6 levels after treatment. Of the eligible 34 studies only 12 were randomized controlled trials. All observational studies showed moderate to serious risk of bias. INTERPRETATION: To date, there is no evidence for a positive effect of the CytoSorb® adsorber on mortality across a variety of diagnoses that justifies its widespread use in intensive care medicine.


Subject(s)
Adsorption , Cardiopulmonary Bypass , Cytokines , Cytokines/adverse effects , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/metabolism , Thoracic Surgery , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control
6.
World J Surg ; 47(1): 40-49, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325205

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Current literature describing the riskiness of operating on actively infected COVID-19 patients far outnumbers that on the risk of operating on recovered patients. The purpose of this study was to analyze a single, tertiary referral center experience regarding postoperative complications and readmissions in COVID-19-recovered patients versus COVID-19-naïve (never previously infected) patients undergoing elective and emergency surgery across all surgical subspecialties. METHODS: All PCR positive COVID-19 patients that underwent a surgical procedure between February 1, 2020, and November 1, 2020, were included in the COVID-positive cohort. These patients were then matched to COVID-naïve controls that underwent similar procedures within the same time frame. Primary outcomes included 30-day postoperative complications as well as 90-day readmissions. Multivariable analyses were also performed. RESULTS: 112 COVID-positive patients met inclusion criteria and were all matched to COVID-naïve controls. 76 patients (68%) underwent surgery > 30 days from their COVID diagnosis. COVID-positive patients were at significantly higher risk of 30-day complications compared to the COVID-naïve cohort (22% versus 8%, respectively; p < 0.01). Multivariable analyses found ambulatory/asymptomatic infections, undergoing surgery between 30 and 120 days from diagnosis, initial presentation to the emergency department and elevated ASA scores to be significantly associated with 30-day complications. No differences were found for 90-day readmissions. CONCLUSION: Patients with previous COVID-19 infections carry a higher perioperative risk profile for 30-day complications compared to COVID-naïve counterparts in unvaccinated populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology
7.
JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 149(4): 334-343, 2023 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318728

ABSTRACT

Importance: Obesity has traditionally been described as a relative contraindication to percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT). Increased familiarity with the technique and use of bronchoscopy or real-time ultrasonography to enhance visualization have led many practitioners to expand the indication for PDT to patients historically deemed to have high risk of perioperative complications. Objective: To assess the reported complication rate of PDT in critically ill adults with obesity and compare it with that of open surgical tracheostomies (OSTs) in this patient population and with that of PDT in their counterparts without obesity. Data Sources: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from January 1, 2000, to March 1, 2022. Key terms related to percutaneous tracheostomy and obesity were included. Study Selection: Original investigations of critically ill adult patients (age ≥18 years) with obesity who underwent PDT that reported at least 1 complication of interest were included. Case reports or series with fewer than 5 patients were excluded, as were studies in a language other than English or French. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) were used, with independent extraction by multiple observers. Frequencies were reported for all dichotomous variables. Relative risks for complications were calculated using both fixed-effects and random-effects models in the meta-analysis. Main Outcomes and Measures: Main outcomes included mortality directly associated with the procedure, conversion to OST, and complications associated with the procedure (subclassified into life-threatening or non-life-threatening adverse events). Results: Eighteen studies were included in the systematic review, comprising 1355 patients with obesity who underwent PDT. The PDT-related complication rate was 16.6% among patients with obesity overall (791 patients, 17 studies), most of which were non-life-threatening. Only 0.6% of cases (8 of 1314 patients, 17 studies) were aborted or converted to an OST. A meta-analysis of 12 studies (N = 4212; 1078 with obesity and 3134 without obesity) showed that patients with obesity had a higher rate of complications associated with PDT compared with their counterparts without obesity (risk ratio, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.38-2.28). A single study compared PDT with OST directly for critically ill adults with obesity; thus, the intended meta-analysis could not be performed in this subgroup. Conclusions and Relevance: The findings suggest that the rate of complications of PDT is low in critically ill individuals with obesity, although the risk of complications may be higher than in individuals without obesity.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Tracheostomy , Humans , Tracheostomy/adverse effects , Tracheostomy/methods , Critical Illness/therapy , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Obesity/complications , Bronchoscopy/methods
8.
Folia Med (Plovdiv) ; 65(2): 215-220, 2023 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315620

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Tension pneumomediastinum is an increasingly common condition since the COVID-19 pandemic's onset. It is a life-threatening complication with severe hemodynamic instability that is refractory to catecholamines. Surgical decompression with drainage is the key point of treatment. Various surgical procedures are reported in the literature, but no cohesive approach has yet been developed. AIM: The aim was to present the available options for surgical treatment of tension pneumomediastinum, as well as the post-interventional results. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine cervical mediastinotomies were performed on intensive-care unit (ICU) patients who developed a tension pneumomediastinum during mechanical ventilation. The age and sex of patients, surgical complications, pre- and post-intervention basic hemodynamic parameters, as well as oxygen saturation levels, were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 62±16 years (6 males and 3 females). No postoperative surgical complications were recorded. The average preoperative systolic blood pressure was 91±12 mmHg, the heart rate was 104±8 bpm, and the oxygen saturation level was 89±6%, while the short-term postoperative values changed to 105±6 mmHg, 101±4 bpm, and 94±5%, respectively. There was no long-term survival benefit, with a mortality rate of 100%. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical mediastinotomy is the operative method of choice in the presence of tension pneumomediastinum allowing an effective decompression of the mediastinal structures and improving the condition of the affected patients without improving the survival rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mediastinal Emphysema , Male , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Mediastinal Emphysema/etiology , Mediastinal Emphysema/surgery , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Pandemics , Heart Rate , Postoperative Complications
9.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 20(11): 1009-1015, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312284

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Wilson disease is an inherited disorder that results in copper accumulation in the tissues with liver injury and failure. Orthotopic liver transplant is one of the treatments of choice for this disease. The aim of this study was to compare the neurological symptoms, before and after orthotopic livertransplant, of patients with liver cirrhosis due to Wilson disease, who represent a special group of patients with liver failure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 2007 and 2020, there were 24 patients with Wilson disease resistant to medical treatment who underwent deceased donor orthotopic livertransplant and were followed up for 1 year, 5 years, and 10 years for evaluation with neurological scoring systems. Patients were also evaluated for postoperative complications and survival. RESULTS: Of the 24 patients evaluated, there were 13 (54.2%) female patients and 11 (45.8%) male patients, and the mean age was 34 years (range, 14-57 years). One of the patients died from early postoperative sepsis. After orthotopic livertransplant, disease scores returned to normal in 16 patients and improved in the remaining patients. Before transplant, all patients required help in their daily activities. After transplant, there were significant improvements in some symptoms, and the patients became more independent in their daily lives. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that orthotopic liver transplant provides significant improvement in neurological symptoms and quality of life in patients with Wilson disease.


Subject(s)
Hepatolenticular Degeneration , Liver Failure , Liver Transplantation , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Hepatolenticular Degeneration/complications , Hepatolenticular Degeneration/diagnosis , Hepatolenticular Degeneration/surgery , Liver Transplantation/methods , Quality of Life , Treatment Outcome , Liver Failure/etiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies
10.
Cir Cir ; 91(1): 21-27, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2310649

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute care surgery decreased during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To study the evolution of acute care surgery and its relationship with the pandemic severity. METHOD: Retrospective cohort study which compared patients who underwent acute care surgery during the pandemic to a control group. RESULTS: A total of 660 patients were included (253 in the control group, 67 in the first-wave, 193 in the valley, and 147 in the second wave). The median daily number of acute care surgery procedures was 2 during the control period. This activity decreased during the first wave (1/day), increased during the valley (2/day), and didn't change in the second wave (2/day). Serious complications were more common during the first wave (22.4%). A negative linear correlation was found between the daily number of acute care surgery procedures, number of patients being admitted to the hospital each day and daily number of patients dying because of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Acute care surgery was reduced during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, increased during the valley, and returned to the pre-pandemic level during the second wave. Thus, acute care surgery was related to pandemic severity, with fewer surgeries being performed when the pandemic was more severe.


ANTECEDENTES: La cirugía urgente disminuyó durante la primera ola de la pandemia de COVID-19. OBJETIVO: Estudiar la evolución de la cirugía urgente y su relación con la gravedad de la pandemia. MÉTODO: Estudio de cohortes retrospectivo que compara los pacientes intervenidos de forma urgente durante la pandemia con un grupo control. RESULTADOS: Se incluyeron 660 pacientes (253 en el grupo control, 67 en primera ola de la pandemia, 193 en el periodo valle y 147 en la segunda ola). La mediana del número de cirugías urgentes fue de 2 (intervalo intercuartílico: 1-3) durante el periodo control, disminuyó durante la primera ola (1/día), aumentó durante el valle (2/día) y no se modificó en la segunda ola (2/día). Las complicaciones mayores fueron más comunes durante la primera ola (22.4%). Se encontró una correlación lineal negativa entre el número de procedimientos quirúrgicos urgentes diarios y el número de ingresos hospitalarios y fallecimientos diarios por COVID-19. CONCLUSIONES: La cirugía urgente se redujo durante la primera ola, aumentó durante el periodo valle y volvió a niveles prepandémicos durante la segunda ola. Además, la cirugía urgente se relaciona con la gravedad de la pandemia, ya que se realizaron menos cirugías urgentes durante el periodo de mayor gravedad de la pandemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology
11.
Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech ; 33(2): 99-107, 2023 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300562

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (L-DP) is the standard procedure for treating left-sided pancreatic tumors. Stapler closure of the pancreas is the preferred method for L-DP; however, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) remains a challenging problem. The present study aimed to compare the surgical outcomes of staple closure using a reinforcing stapler (RS) and transection using an ultrasonic dissector followed by hand-sewn (HS) closure in a fish-mouth manner in pure L-DP and to determine independent perioperative risk factors for clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula (CR-POPF). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Among the 85 patients who underwent pure L-DP between February 2011 and August 2021, 80 of whom the pancreatic stump was closed with RS (n = 59) or HS (n = 21) were retrospectively investigated. Associations between potential risk factors and POPF were assessed using univariate analysis. The factors, of which the P value was determined to be <0.1 by univariate analysis, were entered into a multivariate regression analysis to ascertain independent predictive factors. RESULTS: The surgery time and estimated blood loss were not significantly different between the two groups. Overall, 13 patients (16.3%) developed CR-POPF ( B = 12 and C = 1). The rate of CR-POPF was lower in RS than in HS; however, the difference was not statistically significant (RS vs HS: 11.9% vs 28.9%, P = 0.092). Consistent with the results for CR-POPF, the rate of Clavien-Dindo IIIa or more postoperative complications and the length of hospital stay were also not significantly different between the two groups (RS vs HS: 10.2, 12% vs 14.3%, 14 d). In the univariate analysis of risk factors for CR-POPF, the pancreatic thickness at the transection site, procedure for stump closure, and estimated blood loss were associated with a significantly higher rate of CR-POPF. The multivariate analysis revealed that the pancreatic thickness at the transection site (cutoff: 12 mm) was the only independent risk factor for CR-POPF (odds ratio: 6.5l, 95% CI: 1.4-30.4, P = 0.018). The rate of CR-POPF was much lower in RS than in HS for pancreatic thickness <12 mm (RS vs HS: 4.1% vs 28.6%), whereas that was rather higher in RS than in HS for pancreatic thickness ≥12 mm (RS vs HS: 50% vs 28.6%). CONCLUSIONS: RS closure was superior to HS closure for pancreatic thickness <12 mm and for prevention of CR-POPF after pure L-DP. It is necessary to seek more reliable procedures for pancreatic stump closure in patients with a pancreatic thickness of ≥12 mm.


Subject(s)
Laparoscopy , Pancreatectomy , Humans , Pancreatectomy/adverse effects , Pancreatectomy/methods , Pancreatic Fistula/etiology , Pancreatic Fistula/prevention & control , Pancreatic Fistula/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Pancreas/surgery , Pancreas/pathology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/surgery , Risk Factors , Laparoscopy/adverse effects
12.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 27(5): 65-79, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306689

ABSTRACT

Even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, rates of ambulatory surgeries and ambulatory patients presenting with substance use disorder were increasing, and the end of lockdown has further catalyzed the increasing rates of ambulatory patients presenting for surgery with substance use disorder (SUD). Certain subspecialty groups of ambulatory procedures have already established protocols to optimize early recovery after surgery (ERAS), and these groups have subsequently enjoyed improved efficiency and reduced adverse outcomes as a result. In this present investigation, we review the literature as it relates to substance use disorder patients, with a particular focus on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, and their resulting impact on the acute- or chronic user ambulatory patient. The systematic literature review findings are organized and summarized. We conclude by identifying areas of opportunity for further study, specifically with the aim of developing a dedicated ERAS protocol for substance use disorder patients in the ambulatory surgery setting. - Healthcare in the USA has seen an increase in rates of both substance use disorder patients and separately in ambulatory surgery cases. - Specific perioperative protocols to optimize outcomes for patients who suffer from substance use disorder have been described in recent years. - Agents of interest like opioids, cannabis, and amphetamines are the top three most abused substances in North America. - A protocol and recommend further work should be done to integrate with concrete clinical data, in which strategies should be employed to confer benefits to patient outcomes and hospital quality metrics like those enjoyed by ERAS protocol in other settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Humans , Pain Management/methods , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Postoperative Complications , Systematic Reviews as Topic
13.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 23(1): 96, 2023 03 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306443

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nowadays, people have paid more and more attention to the quality of physical and mental health recovery after oral surgery anesthesia. As a remarkable feature of patient quality management, it can effectively reduce the risk of postoperative complications and pain in Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). However, the patient management model in oral PACU remains unknown, especially in China. The purpose of this study is to explore the management elements of patient quality management in the oral PACU and to construct the management model. METHODS: Strauss and Corbin's grounded theory method was used to explore the experiences of three anesthesiologists, six anesthesia nurses and three administrators working in oral PACU. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted using face-to-face in a tertiary stomatological hospital from March to June, 2022. The interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed according to QSR NVivo 12.0 qualitative analysis tool. RESULTS: Three themes and ten subthemes were identified through an active analysis process, including three of the core team members: stomatological anesthesiologists, stomatological anesthesia nurses and administrators, three of the main functions: education and training, patient care and quality control and four of the team operation processes: analysis, plan, do, check. CONCLUSION: The patient quality management model of the oral PACU is helpful for the professional identity and career development of stomatological anesthesia staff in China, which can accelerate the professional development of oral anesthesia nursing quality. According to the model, the patient's pain and fear will decrease, meanwhile, safety and comfort will increase. It can make contributions to the theoretical research and clinical practice in the future.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiology , Humans , Grounded Theory , Pain , Postoperative Complications , Quality Improvement
14.
Trials ; 24(1): 280, 2023 Apr 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295338

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are prevalent in geriatric patients with hip fractures. Low oxygen level is one of the most important risk factors for PPCs. Prone position has been proven efficacy in improving oxygenation and delaying the progress of pulmonary diseases, especially in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by multiple etiologies. The application of awake prone position (APP) has also attracted widespread attention in recent years. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be carried out to measure the effect of postoperative APP in a population of geriatric patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. METHODS: This is an RCT. Patients older than 65 years old admitted through the emergency department and diagnosed with an intertrochanteric or femoral neck fracture will be eligible for enrollment and assigned randomly to the control group with routine postoperative management of orthopedics or APP group with an additional prone position for the first three consecutive postoperative days (PODs). Patients receiving conservative treatment will not be eligible for enrollment. We will record the difference in the patient's room-air-breathing arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) values between the 4th POD (POD 4) and emergency visits, the morbidity of PPCs and other postoperative complications, and length of stay. The incidence of PPCs, readmission rates, and mortality rates will be followed up for 90 PODs. DISCUSSION: We describe the protocol for a single-center RCT that will evaluate the efficacy of postoperative APP treatment in reducing pulmonary complications and improving oxygenation in geriatric patients with hip fractures. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This protocol was approved by the independent ethics committee (IEC) for Clinical Research of Zhongda Hospital, Affiliated to Southeast University, and is registered on the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry. The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals. ETHICS APPROVAL NUMBER: 2021ZDSYLL203-P01 TRIAL REGISTRATION: ChiCTR ChiCTR2100049311 . Registered on 29 July 2021. TRIAL STATUS: Recruiting. Recruitment is expected to be completed in December 2024.


Subject(s)
Hip Fractures , Wakefulness , Humans , Aged , Prone Position , Lung , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Oxygen , Hip Fractures/surgery , Treatment Outcome , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
15.
J Surg Res ; 287: 117-123, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2293324

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In the spring of 2020, New York City was one of the first epicenters of the COVID outbreak. In this study, we evaluate the incidence and treatment of appendicitis in two New York City community hospitals during the COVID pandemic. METHODS: This retrospective study focused on the incidence and outcome of acute appendicitis in the adult population (>18 y old) during peak-COVID periods (March 16, 2020,-June 15, 2020) compared to pre-COVID and post-COVID periods. We compared the number of patients who underwent operative versus nonoperative management, patient demographics, length of stay (LOS), complications, and readmission rates within these time periods. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation (analysis of variance). RESULTS: From January 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020, 393 patients presented with acute appendicitis and 321 (81.7%) were treated operatively, compared to 441 total and 366 treated operatively (83%) in 2019 (P = 0.88). During the COVID outbreak, fewer patients presented with appendicitis (mean 6.9 ± 1 pre-COVID case/week, 4.4 ± 2.4 peak-COVID cases/week and 7.6 ± 0.65 post-COVID cases/week, P = 0.018) with no significant difference in the pre-COVID and post-COVID period. There was no difference in LOS between the pre-, peak-, and post-COVID periods with a median of 1 for all the three, (interquartile range (IQR): 0.8-2, 0.6-2, 0.6-2, respectively, P = 0.43). Additionally, there was no difference in 30-day readmission rates (4.2%, 0%, 3.9%, P = 0.99) and postoperative complications (4.2%, 0%, 2.9%, P = 0.98). CONCLUSIONS: During peak-COVID, there was a significant reduction in the number of patients who presented with acute appendicitis without a post rebound increase in presentation. Those who presented during peak-COVID were able to undergo operative management safely, without affecting LOS or postoperative complications.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis , COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Appendicitis/epidemiology , Appendicitis/surgery , Appendicitis/complications , Appendectomy/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Length of Stay , Acute Disease
16.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0283835, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291868

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a great deal of damage to daily medical care. We investigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on bone and soft tissue tumor treatment at our hospital. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective comparative study of two groups of patients at Osaka City University Hospital during the period of increasing COVID-19 infections (February-December 2020, group C) and the same period the previous year (February- December 2019, group NC). Clinical data, including patient's age, gender, type of tumor, neoplasms, number of surgical cases for inpatients and outpatients, operation time, use of implants, length of hospital stay, inpatient hospital costs, number of inpatients receiving anticancer drugs, and postoperative complications in these two groups were retrospectively evaluated. RESULTS: The number of cases of malignant bone and soft tissue tumors that were resected during hospitalization was predominantly higher in group C than in group NC (P = 0.01). There were no significant differences in operation time, use of implants, and postoperative complications between group C and group NC, but there were significant differences in the length of hospital stay and hospital costs (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has been recognized throughout the world to have adverse effects in a variety of areas. It had a negative impact on hospital costs and the length of hospital stay in the field of bone and soft tissue tumor treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Soft Tissue Neoplasms , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications
17.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 44(4): 103857, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303455

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Given the increasing utilization of endoscopic surgery, particularly for airway stenosis management in the era of COVID-19 due to prolonged intubation, it is important to examine whether continuing antithrombotic therapy perioperatively influences bleeding complications. We examined the impact of perioperative antithrombotic use on postoperative bleeding complications following endoscopic airway surgery for laryngotracheal stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective study from January 2016 to December 2021 of cases of patients ≥18 years who underwent endoscopic airway surgery for posterior glottic, subglottic, and tracheal stenosis at a single institution. Cases were excluded if they were an open airway surgery. The primary outcome was the occurrence of postoperative bleeding complications across cases of patients naive to and on baseline antithrombotic therapy, and those with preoperative continuation versus cessation of antithrombotic therapy. RESULTS: 258 cases across 96 patients met inclusion criteria. Of these 258 cases, 43.4 % (n = 112) were performed for patients on baseline antithrombotic therapy and 56.6 % (n = 146) for those not on antithrombotic therapy. Likelihood of perioperative continuation of apixaban was 0.052 (odds ratio, 95 % Confidence Interval: 0.002-0.330, p < 0.001). Likelihood of perioperative continuation of aspirin was 9.87 (odds ratio, 95 % Confidence Interval: 2.32-43.0, p < 0.001). Two instances of postoperative bleeding were found: both in patients who were on aspirin without perioperative cessation for COVID-related coagulopathy. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that perioperative continuation of aspirin is relatively safe in the setting of endoscopic surgery for airway stenosis management. Prospective investigations to increase understanding of perioperative antithrombotics for COVID-related coagulopathy are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laryngostenosis , Tracheal Stenosis , Humans , Fibrinolytic Agents/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Tracheal Stenosis/surgery , Constriction, Pathologic , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/complications , Postoperative Hemorrhage/etiology , Postoperative Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Aspirin/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Laryngostenosis/etiology
19.
Rev. colomb. cir ; 38(2): 300-312, 20230303. tab
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2280402

ABSTRACT

Introducción. La condición de pandemia por COVID-19 impactó a la sociedad y los sistemas de salud a nivel mundial. Las adaptaciones institucionales procuraron mantener la calidad de la atención a pesar de un contexto organizacional desfavorable. La apendicitis aguda requirió ser manejada en un nuevo escenario institucional. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la efectividad del tratamiento quirúrgico de la apendicitis durante la pandemia. Métodos. Estudio observacional analítico, retrospectivo, en el que se incluyeron pacientes sometidos a apendicectomía, antes y durante la pandemia por COVID-19. Se evaluaron las complicaciones, infección del sitio operatorio, reingresos y estancia hospitalaria. Adicionalmente, se analizaron los desenlaces en los 3 picos epidemiológicos de la pandemia. Se efectuaron estadísticas descriptivas y analíticas entre los grupos a comparar. Resultados. Se incluyeron 1521 pacientes con apendicitis, 48,3 % operados antes y 51,7 % durante la pandemia. No hubo diferencias entre los grupos en complicaciones (p=0,352), infección del sitio operatorio (p=0,191), reingreso en los primeros 30 días (p=0,605) y estancia hospitalaria (p=0,514). El manejo de la apendicitis durante el tercer pico fue similar a las prácticas habituales. El tiempo de evolución fue mayor durante la pandemia (p=0,04) y los pacientes fueron llevados a cirugía más pronto que previo a la pandemia (p<0,001). Conclusiones. No se evidenció un incremento de complicaciones quirúrgicas, reingresos, estancia hospitalaria ni infección del sitio operatorio en los pacientes operados durante la pandemia. Hubo un efecto favorable para los pacientes como consecuencia de la adaptación institucional en la pandemia por COVID-19


Introduction. COVID-19 pandemic impacted society and health systems worldwide. The institutional adaptations sought to maintain the quality of care in an unfavorable organizational context. Acute appendicitis was required to be managed in a new institutional setting. The effectiveness of surgical treatment of appendicitis during the pandemic was evaluated. Methods. Retrospective analytical observational study, in patients with appendectomy, before and during COVID-19 pandemic. Complications, surgical site infections, readmissions, and hospital stay were evaluated. Additionally, the outcomes in the 3 epidemiological peaks of the pandemic were analyzed. Descriptive and analytical statistics were performed between the groups to be compared. Results. A total of 1521 patients with appendicitis were included, 48.3% before and 51.7% during the pandemic. There were no differences in complications (p=0.352), operative site infection (p=0.191), readmission at 30 days (p=0.605), and hospital stay (p=0.514) between the groups. Management of appendicitis during the 3rd peak was like usual practices. There was a long evolution time during the pandemic (p=0.04) and the patients were taken to surgery sooner than before the pandemic (p<0.001). Conclusions. There was no evidence of an increase in surgical complications, readmissions, hospital stay, and surgical site infections during patients who underwent surgery. There was a favorable effect for patients because of institutional adaptation in the COVID-19 pandemic


Subject(s)
Humans , Appendicitis , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Coronavirus Infections , Postoperative Complications , Pandemics , Length of Stay
20.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 22(1): 232, 2022 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2274767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Decrease in histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) was reported as a cause of dysregulation of the coagulation-fibrinolysis and immune systems, leading to multi-organ failure, and it may be a biomarker for sepsis, ventilator-associated pneumonia, preeclampsia, and coronavirus disease 2019. However, the usefulness of HRG in perioperative management remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the usefulness of HRG as a biomarker for predicting postoperative complications. METHODS: This was a single-center, prospective, observational study of 150 adult patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit after surgery. Postoperative complications were defined as those having a grade II or higher in the Clavien-Dindo classification, occurring within 7 days after surgery. The primary outcome was HRG levels in the patients with and without postoperative complications. The secondary outcome was the ability of HRG, white blood cell, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and presepsin to predict postoperative complications. Data are presented as number and median (interquartile range). RESULTS: The incidence of postoperative complications was 40%. The HRG levels on postoperative day 1 were significantly lower in patients who developed postoperative complications (n = 60; 21.50 [18.12-25.74] µg/mL) than in those who did not develop postoperative complications (n = 90; 25.46 [21.05-31.63] µg/mL). The Harrell C-index scores for postoperative complications were HRG, 0.65; white blood cell, 0.50; C-reactive protein, 0.59; procalcitonin, 0.73; and presepsin, 0.73. HRG was independent predictor of postoperative complications when adjusted for age, the presence of preoperative cardiovascular comorbidities, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification, operative time, and the volume of intraoperative bleeding (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.90-0.99). CONCLUSIONS: The HRG levels on postoperative day 1 could predict postoperative complications. Hence, HRG may be a useful biomarker for predicting postoperative complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Procalcitonin , Adult , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors , Peptide Fragments , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Proteins
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