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1.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 8: CD010168, 2021 08 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1813437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This is the second update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2015 and last updated in 2018. Appendectomy, the surgical removal of the appendix, is performed primarily for acute appendicitis. Patients who undergo appendectomy for complicated appendicitis, defined as gangrenous or perforated appendicitis, are more likely to suffer postoperative complications. The routine use of abdominal drainage to reduce postoperative complications after appendectomy for complicated appendicitis is controversial. OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety and efficacy of abdominal drainage to prevent intraperitoneal abscess after appendectomy (irrespective of open or laparoscopic) for complicated appendicitis; to compare the effects of different types of surgical drains; and to evaluate the optimal time for drain removal. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Web of Science, the World Health Organization International Trials Registry Platform, ClinicalTrials.gov, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and three trials registers on 24 February 2020, together with reference checking, citation searching, and contact with study authors to identify additional studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared abdominal drainage versus no drainage in people undergoing emergency open or laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis. We also included RCTs that compared different types of drains and different schedules for drain removal in people undergoing appendectomy for complicated appendicitis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors independently identified the trials for inclusion, collected the data, and assessed the risk of bias. We used the GRADE approach to assess evidence certainty. We included intraperitoneal abscess as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were wound infection, morbidity, mortality, hospital stay, hospital costs, pain, and quality of life. MAIN RESULTS: Use of drain versus no drain We included six RCTs (521 participants) comparing abdominal drainage and no drainage in participants undergoing emergency open appendectomy for complicated appendicitis. The studies were conducted in North America, Asia, and Africa. The majority of participants had perforated appendicitis with local or general peritonitis. All participants received antibiotic regimens after open appendectomy. None of the trials was assessed as at low risk of bias. The evidence is very uncertain regarding the effects of abdominal drainage versus no drainage on intraperitoneal abscess at 30 days (risk ratio (RR) 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 3.21; 5 RCTs; 453 participants; very low-certainty evidence) or wound infection at 30 days (RR 2.01, 95% CI 0.88 to 4.56; 5 RCTs; 478 participants; very low-certainty evidence). There were seven deaths in the drainage group (N = 183) compared to one in the no-drainage group (N = 180), equating to an increase in the risk of 30-day mortality from 0.6% to 2.7% (Peto odds ratio 4.88, 95% CI 1.18 to 20.09; 4 RCTs; 363 participants; low-certainty evidence). Abdominal drainage may increase 30-day overall complication rate (morbidity; RR 6.67, 95% CI 2.13 to 20.87; 1 RCT; 90 participants; low-certainty evidence) and hospital stay by 2.17 days (95% CI 1.76 to 2.58; 3 RCTs; 298 participants; low-certainty evidence) compared to no drainage. The outcomes hospital costs, pain, and quality of life were not reported in any of the included studies. There were no RCTs comparing the use of drain versus no drain in participants undergoing emergency laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis. Open drain versus closed drain There were no RCTs comparing open drain versus closed drain for complicated appendicitis. Early versus late drain removal There were no RCTs comparing early versus late drain removal for complicated appendicitis. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The certainty of the currently available evidence is low to very low. The effect of abdominal drainage on the prevention of intraperitoneal abscess or wound infection after open appendectomy is uncertain for patients with complicated appendicitis. The increased rates for overall complication rate and hospital stay for the drainage group compared to the no-drainage group are based on low-certainty evidence. Consequently, there is no evidence for any clinical improvement with the use of abdominal drainage in patients undergoing open appendectomy for complicated appendicitis. The increased risk of mortality with drainage comes from eight deaths observed in just under 400 recruited participants. Larger studies are needed to more reliably determine the effects of drainage on morbidity and mortality outcomes.


Subject(s)
Abscess/prevention & control , Appendectomy/adverse effects , Appendicitis/surgery , Drainage/methods , Peritonitis/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Humans
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(5): 1765-1769, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754186

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Few data are available on the ICU management and on the possible respiratory complications of invasively ventilated pregnant patients affected by COVID-19 pneumonia, especially in the early phase of pregnancy. Tension pneumothorax has been previously described as a rare cause of respiratory failure after delivery, but its occurrence in the postpartum of COVID-19 patient has not been reported yet. We hereby describe the ICU management of a 23rd gestational week pregnant woman who underwent invasive mechanical ventilation, prone positioning, and cesarean delivery during her ICU stay for COVID-19 related pneumonia. Moreover, we focused on the occurrence and management of recurrent tension pneumothorax after the cesarean delivery. CASE REPORT: A 23rd gestational week pregnant woman was admitted to the ICU for a COVID-19 bilateral pneumonia and underwent invasive mechanical ventilation and prone positioning. Cesarean delivery was planned during the ICU stay, while the patient was receiving invasive mechanical ventilation. After delivery, the patient experienced a recurrent pneumothorax that required the positioning of multiple chest drains. CONCLUSIONS: In pregnant critically ill COVID-19 patients, mechanical ventilation management is particularly challenging, especially in the postpartum period. Prone positioning is feasible and can improve oxygenation and respiratory system compliance, while tension pneumothorax must be suspected if the respiratory function suddenly deteriorates after delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cesarean Section , Critical Illness , Pneumothorax/etiology , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Postoperative Complications/diagnostic imaging , Pregnancy , Prone Position , Recurrence , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Treatment Outcome
4.
CNS Neurosci Ther ; 28(4): 470-483, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745958

ABSTRACT

Postoperative neurological disorders, including postoperative delirium (POD), postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), postoperative covert ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke, are challenging clinical problems in the emerging aged surgical population. These disorders can deteriorate functional outcomes and long-term quality of life after surgery, resulting in a substantial social and financial burden to the family and society. Understanding predisposing and precipitating factors may promote individualized preventive treatment for each disorder, as several risk factors are modifiable. Besides prevention, timely identification and treatment of etiologies and symptoms can contribute to better recovery from postoperative neurological disorders and lower risk of long-term cognitive impairment, disability, and even death. Herein, we summarize the diagnosis, risk factors, prevention, and treatment of these postoperative complications, with emphasis on recent advances and perspectives.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Dysfunction , Delirium , Postoperative Cognitive Complications , Aged , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Humans , Postoperative Complications , Quality of Life , Risk Factors
5.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(6): 3067-3072, 2021 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1737119

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: Plastic biliary stents that remain in situ for more than 12 months, called forgotten biliary stents (FBSs), can cause complications such as cholangitis, stent migration, stent occlusion, and perforation. Materials and methods: The medical records of patients who underwent ERCP procedures from December 2016 to December 2020 were analysed retrospectively. Data on patient characteristics, indications for ERCP and stenting, stent types, stenting duration, complications, and causes of FBSs were obtained from the hospital's database. Results: A total of 48 cases with FBSs were analysed. The mean age (SD) of the patients was 71.23 years (±12.165), the male-to-female ratio was 23/25 (0.92), and the mean stenting duration was 27.12 months (range: 12­84 months). The most common indication for biliary stenting was irretrievable choledochal stones (40/48). Stone formation (79%) and proximal stent migration (26.4%) were the most frequent complications. The patients in the FBS group were significantly older than those from whom stents were removed in a timely manner (71.23 vs. 62.43 years, p < 0.001). Endoscopic treatment was possible in all cases; surgery was not required in any case. The most common cause of FBSs cited by patients was not having been informed about the need for long-term management of their stents (n = 14, 29.2%) Conclusion: FBSs are potentially problematic particularly in elderly patients. Communication with the patient to remind them of the need for stent management is important for preventing FBSs.


Subject(s)
Biliary Tract Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Cholelithiasis/surgery , Gallstones/surgery , Stents/adverse effects , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde/adverse effects , Cholelithiasis/diagnosis , Female , Foreign Bodies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
6.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(2)2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723593

ABSTRACT

A man aged 26 years presented with complaints of diminution of vision in his right eye for 1 year following a fist injury. He had a history of laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis in both eyes 5 years earlier. On examination, his uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) in the right eye was 1.0 logMAR. Slit-lamp examination of the right eye revealed a superotemporal dislocation of the flap with coexisting epithelial ingrowth encroaching the pupillary area. Due to the presence of long-standing fixed flap folds, a flap amputation was performed along with removal of the epithelial ingrowth using 0.02% mitomycin C as adjunct. Postoperatively, the UDVA was 0.3 logMAR on day 1, which improved to 0.2 logMAR at 1 week. At 1 year, the UDVA was 0.2 logMAR improving to 0.1 logMAR with refraction, with minimal paracentral corneal haze and no signs of corneal ectasia.


Subject(s)
Epithelium, Corneal , Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ , Adult , Amputation , Epithelium, Corneal/surgery , Humans , Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ/adverse effects , Male , Postoperative Complications , Refraction, Ocular , Surgical Flaps
7.
Aust Health Rev ; 46(1): 42-51, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1721776

ABSTRACT

Objectives The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate resource use and predictors associated with critical care unit (CCU) admission after primary bariatric surgery within the Tasmanian public healthcare system. Methods Patients undergoing primary bariatric surgery in the Tasmanian Health Service (THS) public hospital system between 7 July 2013 and 30 June 2019 were eligible for inclusion in this study. The THS provides two levels of CCU support, an intensive care unit (ICU) and a high dependency unit (HDU). A mixed-methods approach was performed to examine the resource use and predictors associated with overall CCU admission, as well as levels of HDU and ICU admission. Results There were 254 patients in the study. Of these, 44 (17.3%) required 54 postoperative CCU admissions, with 43% requiring HDU support and 57% requiring more resource-demanding ICU support. Overall, CCU patients were more likely to have higher preoperative body mass index and multimorbidity and to undergo sleeve gastrectomy or gastric bypass. Patients undergoing gastric banding were more likely to require HDU rather than ICU support. Total hospital stays and median healthcare costs were higher for CCU (particularly ICU) patients than non-CCU patients. Conclusions Bariatric surgery patients often have significant comorbidities. This study demonstrates that patients with higher levels of morbidity are more likely to require critical care postoperatively. Because this is elective surgery, being able to identify patients who are at increased risk is important to plan either the availability of critical care or even interventions to improve patients' preoperative risk. Further work is required to refine the pre-existing conditions that contribute most to the requirement for critical care management (particularly in the ICU setting) in the perioperative period. What is known about the topic? Few studies (both Australian and international) have investigated the use of CCUs after bariatric surgery. Those that report CCU admission rates are disparate across the contemporaneous literature, reflecting the different healthcare systems and their associated incentives. In Australia, the incidence and utilisation of CCUs (consisting of HDUs and ICUs) after bariatric surgery have only been reported using Western Australian administrative data. What does the paper add? CCU patients were more likely to have a higher preoperative body mass index and multimorbidity and to undergo a sleeve gastrectomy or gastric bypass procedure. Just over half (57%) of these patients were managed in the ICU. Sleeve gastrectomy patients had a higher incidence of peri- and postoperative complications that resulted in an unplanned ICU admission. Hospital length of stay and aggregated costs were higher for CCU (particularly ICU) patients. What are the implications for practitioners? The association of increased CCU (particularly ICU) use with multimorbidity and peri- and postoperative complications could enable earlier recognition of patients that are more likely to require CCU and ICU support, therefore allowing improved planning when faced with increasing rates of bariatric surgery. We suggest streamlined clinical guidelines that anticipate CCU support for people with severe and morbid obesity who undergo bariatric surgery should be considered from a national perspective.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , Australia/epidemiology , Critical Care , Delivery of Health Care , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Postoperative Complications , Retrospective Studies
8.
Anticancer Res ; 42(3): 1623-1628, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1716347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: The significance of spirometry as preoperative risk assessment for gastrointestinal surgery has been controversial. At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, preoperative spirometry was temporarily suspended in our institute. This study was aimed to investigate the necessity of spirometry for gastrointestinal cancer surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We compared short-term postoperative outcomes between 318 patients who underwent surgery for colorectal or gastric cancer with (Spirometry group; n=272) or without spirometry (Non-spirometry group; n=46). RESULTS: Respiratory functional disorders were detected in 77 (28.3%) patients in the Spirometry group. No significant differences were noted in complications, including pneumonia, or the length of hospital stay between the two groups. An advanced age, male sex, comorbidities with respiratory diseases, and a smoking history significantly correlated with abnormal results in spirometry. CONCLUSION: Preoperative spirometry may be substituted with other clinical factors in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.


Subject(s)
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/surgery , Preoperative Care , Spirometry , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Female , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
9.
J Card Surg ; 37(5): 1161-1167, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714238

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been and will continue to be a challenge to the healthcare system worldwide. In this context, we aimed to discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the diagnosis, timing, and prognosis of surgical treatment for active infective endocarditis (IE) during the pandemic and share our coping strategy. METHODS: A total of 39 patients were admitted for active IE in the year 2020. The number of the same period last year was 50. Medical information of these two groups was extracted from our surgical database. Data were compared between the two groups and differences with or without statistical significance were discussed. RESULTS: In the pandemic year, we admitted fewer transferred patients (64.1% vs. 80%, p = .094). Timespan for diagnosis were prolonged (60 vs. 34.5 days, p = .081). More patients were admitted in emergency (41% vs. 20%, p = .030) More patients had heart failure (74.4% vs. 40%, p = .001), sepsis (69.2% vs. 42.0%, p = .018), or cardiogenic shock (25.6% vs. 8.0%, p = .038). Overall surgical risk (EuroSCORE II) was higher (4.15% vs. 3.24%, p = .019) and more commando surgery was performed (7.7% vs. 2.0%, p = .441). However, we did not see more postoperative complications, and early mortality was not worse either (0 vs. 4%, p = .502). CONCLUSIONS: The negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the clinical practice of surgical treatment for active IE was multifaceted. However, with the preservation of the effectiveness of multidisciplinary IE surgical team, the early outcomes were comparable with those in the normal years.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Endocarditis/surgery , Endocarditis, Bacterial/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
11.
J Am Coll Surg ; 234(2): 115-120, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) continues to be the primary modality of liver transplantation in Asia, but it accounts for about 5% of all liver transplantations in the US. ABO incompatibility is the primary reason motivated donors are declined. Although kidney paired exchanges are common, liver paired exchange (LPE) is still evolving in the US. STUDY DESIGN: This is a retrospective review (between January 1, 2019, and July 31, 2021) of our initial experience with LPE. RESULTS: A total of 10 LPEs (20 LDLTs) were performed during the study period. Seven LPEs were initiated by a nondirected O donor. The other 3 pair sets involved 1 ABO compatible and 1 ABO incompatible pair. Transplantations in a pair set were completed within a mean of 4.8 (range 1-14) days of each other. All 20 donors are doing well with no major complications at 12.7 (range 1-20) months. Seventeen of 20 recipients are alive and have good allograft function. One recipient died in the early postoperative period. Two late deaths of patients with functioning allografts were due to COVID-19 (at 8 months) and peritoneal carcinomatosis and gram-negative sepsis (at 9 months). CONCLUSIONS: LPE is feasible in a high-volume LDLT center and is a useful option to increase LDLT by overcoming ABO incompatibility. Nondirected donors can be utilized to initiate an LPE.


Subject(s)
Liver Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Living Donors/statistics & numerical data , Tissue and Organ Procurement/methods , ABO Blood-Group System , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Blood Group Incompatibility , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Female , Humans , Kidney , Living Donors/supply & distribution , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Tissue and Organ Procurement/statistics & numerical data , Transplant Recipients/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
12.
Transplantation ; 105(7): 1433-1444, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707615

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) fatality rate is high among kidney transplant recipients. Among survivors, kidney outcomes, seroconversion, and persistence of viral shedding are unexplored. METHODS: Single-center prospective cohort study including data from kidney transplant recipients with confirmed COVID-19 between March 20, 2020 and July 31, 2020. Outcomes were adjudicated until August 31, 2020 or the date of death. RESULTS: There were 491 patients with COVID-19 among the 11 875 recipients in follow-up. The majority were middle aged with ≥1 comorbidities. Thirty-one percent were treated at home, and 69% required hospitalization. Among the hospitalized, 61% needed intensive care, 75% presented allograft dysfunction, and 46% needed dialysis. The overall 28-day fatality rate was 22% and among hospitalized patients it was 41%. Age (odds ratio, 3.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-5.09), diabetes mellitus (odds ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.72), and cardiac disease (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.68) were independent factors for death. Among the 351 survivors, 19% sustained renal graft dysfunction, and there were 13 (4%) graft losses. Biopsy (n = 20) findings were diverse but decisive to guide treatment and estimate prognosis. Seroconversion was observed in 79% of the survivors and was associated with disease severity. Persistence of viral shedding was observed in 21% of the patients without detectable clinical implications. CONCLUSIONS: This prospective cohort analysis confirms the high 28-day fatality rate of COVID-19, associated primarily with age and comorbidities. The high incidence of allograft dysfunction was associated with a wide range of specific histologic lesions and high rates of sequelae and graft loss. Seroconversion was high and the persistence of viral shedding deserves further studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Kidney Transplantation , Postoperative Complications , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Progression , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Prognosis , Prospective Studies
13.
Transplantation ; 105(7): 1405-1422, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706459

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has raised concerns for programs overseeing donation and transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs (CTO) that this virus might be transmissible by transfusion or transplantation. Transplant recipients are considered particularly vulnerable to pathogens because of immunosuppression, and SARS-CoV-2 is likely to generate complications if contracted. Several signs and symptoms observed in COVID-19 positive patients reflect damage to multiple organs and tissues, raising the possibility of extrapulmonary SARS-CoV-2 infections and risk of transmission. At the beginning of the pandemic, a consensus has emerged not to consider COVID-19 positive patients as potential living or deceased donors, resulting in a global decrease in transplantation procedures. Medical decision-making at the time of organ allocation must consider safely alongside the survival advantages offered by transplantation. To address the risk of transmission by transplantation, this review summarizes the published cases of transplantation of cells or organs from donors infected with SARS-CoV-2 until January 2021 and assesses the current state of knowledge for the detection of this virus in different biologic specimens, cells, tissues, and organs. Evidence collected to date raises the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 infection and replication in some CTO, which makes it impossible to exclude transmission through transplantation. However, most studies focused on evaluating transmission under laboratory conditions with inconsistent findings, rendering the comparison of results difficult. Improved standardization of donors and CTO screening practices, along with a systematic follow-up of transplant recipients could facilitate the assessment of SARS-CoV-2 transmission risk by transplantation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Donor Selection/methods , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Organ Transplantation/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Risk
15.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 22(1): 46, 2022 02 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690973

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data to detail the perioperative anesthetic management and the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications among patients requiring an anesthetic procedure while being SARS-CoV-2 positive or suspected. METHODS: An observational multicenter cohort study was performed including consecutive patients who were SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected and who underwent scheduled and emergency anesthesia between March 17 and May 26, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 187 patients underwent anesthesia with SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected, with ultimately 135 (72.2%) patients positive and 52 (27.8%) negative. The median SOFA score was 2 [0; 5], and the median ARISCAT score was 49 [36; 67]. The major respiratory complications rate was 48.7% (n = 91) with 40.4% (n = 21) and 51.9% (n = 70) in the SARS-CoV-2-negative and -positive groups, respectively (p = 0.21). Among both positive and negative groups, patients with a high ARISCAT risk score (> 44) had a higher risk of presenting major respiratory complications (p < 0.01 and p = 0.1, respectively). DISCUSSION: When comparing SARS-COV-2-positive and -negative patients, no significant difference was found regarding the rate of postoperative complications, while baseline characteristics strongly impact these outcomes. This finding suggests that patients should be scheduled for anesthetic procedures based on their overall risk of postoperative complication, and not just based on their SARS-CoV-2 status.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , COVID-19/complications , Aged , Anesthesia/adverse effects , Cohort Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Perioperative Care , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Registries , Respiratory Tract Diseases/complications , Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
17.
Obes Surg ; 32(5): 1451-1458, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1681711

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To compare sleeve gastrectomy (SG) to SG associated with Rossetti fundoplication (SG + RF) in terms of de novo gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) after surgery, weight loss, and postoperative complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients affected by morbid obesity, without symptoms of GERD, who were never in therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were randomized into two groups. One group underwent SG and the other SG + RF. The study was stopped on February 2020 due to the COVID pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 278 patients of the programmed number of 404 patients were enrolled (68.8%). De novo esophagitis was considered in those patients who had both pre- and postoperative gastroscopy (97/278, 34.9%). Two hundred fifty-one patients (90.3%) had completed clinical follow-up at 12 months. SG + RF resulted in an adequate weight loss, similar to classic SG at 12-month follow-up (%TWL = 35. 4 ± 7.2%) with a significantly better outcome in terms of GERD development. One year after surgery, PPIs were necessary in 4.3% SG + RF patients compared to 17.1% SG patients (p = 0.001). Esophagitis was present in 2.0% of SG + RF patients versus 23.4% SG patients (p = 0.002). The main complication after SG + RF was wrap perforation (4.3%), which improved with the surgeon's learning curve. CONCLUSION: SG + RF seemed to be an effective alternative to classic SG in preventing de novo GERD. More studies are needed to establish that an adequate learning curve decreases the higher percentage of short-term complications in the SG + RF group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Esophagitis , Gastroesophageal Reflux , Laparoscopy , Obesity, Morbid , Esophagitis/etiology , Fundoplication/adverse effects , Gastrectomy/adverse effects , Gastrectomy/methods , Gastroesophageal Reflux/diagnosis , Humans , Laparoscopy/adverse effects , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Proton Pump Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Weight Loss
18.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(2): 103393, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676388

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly expanded the use of telemedicine in healthcare. Surgical thyroid and parathyroid diseases are uniquely suited for comprehensive telemedicine. The objective of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of telemedicine with in-person preoperative visits in patients undergoing thyroid and parathyroid surgery. METHODS: Prospective cohort study of patients undergoing thyroid and parathyroid surgery at a tertiary care center in a COVID-19 hotspot from March 2020 to October 2020. Patients were divided into a telemedicine cohort, with preoperative consultation and surgical decision-making conducted via telemedicine, and a conventional in-person cohort. RESULTS: Of 94 patients, 28 were enrolled in the telemedicine cohort and 66 were enrolled in the conventional cohort. Telemedicine patients were more likely to have parathyroid disease (50% versus 24%, p = 0.02) compared with the conventional cohort, but there was no significant difference in surgery for malignancy (43% versus 56%, p = 0.27). There were no significant differences in surgical outcomes or postoperative complications between cohorts, including intraoperative blood loss (19.4 mL versus 35.5 mL, p = 0.06), postoperative length of stay (1.3 days versus 1.2 days, p = 0.93), persistent hypocalcemia (3.6% versus 0%, p = 0.30), and true vocal fold paresis (0% versus 4.5%, p = 0.55). CONCLUSIONS: With careful selection, many patients undergoing thyroid and parathyroid surgery may be safely treated using comprehensive telemedicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parathyroidectomy , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thyroid Gland , Thyroidectomy
19.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 1349, 2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661975

ABSTRACT

Irrespective of its etiology, emergency surgical abdominal exploration (EAE) is considered a high-risk procedure with mortality rates exceeding 20%. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in outcomes in patients who required EAE due to complications of complex elective abdominal procedures and those who required EAE due to high-risk primary abdominal emergencies. Patients undergoing EAE for acute surgical complications of complex abdominal elective surgical procedures (N = 293; Elective group) and patients undergoing EAE for high-risk primary abdominal emergencies (N = 776; Emergency group) from 2012 to 2019 at our institution were retrospectively assessed for morbidity and mortality. Postoperative complications occurred in 196 patients (66.94%) in the elective group and 585 patients (75.4%) in the emergency group. The relatively low complication burden in the elective group was also evidenced by a significantly lower comprehensive complication index score (54.00 ± 37.36 vs. 59.25 ± 37.08, p = 0.040). The in-hospital mortality rates were 31% (91 of 293) and 38% (295 of 776) in the elective and emergency groups, respectively. This difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p = 0.035). In multivariate analysis, age, peripheral artery disease, pneumonia, thromboembolic events, ICU stay, ventilator dependence, acute kidney failure and liver failure were independent predictors of mortality. Our data show that patients undergoing EAE due to acute complications of major elective surgery tolerate the procedure relatively well compared with patients undergoing EAE due to primary high-risk abdominal emergencies.


Subject(s)
Abdomen/surgery , Elective Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Laparotomy/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
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