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2.
Transplantation ; 105(7): 1433-1444, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707615

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) fatality rate is high among kidney transplant recipients. Among survivors, kidney outcomes, seroconversion, and persistence of viral shedding are unexplored. METHODS: Single-center prospective cohort study including data from kidney transplant recipients with confirmed COVID-19 between March 20, 2020 and July 31, 2020. Outcomes were adjudicated until August 31, 2020 or the date of death. RESULTS: There were 491 patients with COVID-19 among the 11 875 recipients in follow-up. The majority were middle aged with ≥1 comorbidities. Thirty-one percent were treated at home, and 69% required hospitalization. Among the hospitalized, 61% needed intensive care, 75% presented allograft dysfunction, and 46% needed dialysis. The overall 28-day fatality rate was 22% and among hospitalized patients it was 41%. Age (odds ratio, 3.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-5.09), diabetes mellitus (odds ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.72), and cardiac disease (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.68) were independent factors for death. Among the 351 survivors, 19% sustained renal graft dysfunction, and there were 13 (4%) graft losses. Biopsy (n = 20) findings were diverse but decisive to guide treatment and estimate prognosis. Seroconversion was observed in 79% of the survivors and was associated with disease severity. Persistence of viral shedding was observed in 21% of the patients without detectable clinical implications. CONCLUSIONS: This prospective cohort analysis confirms the high 28-day fatality rate of COVID-19, associated primarily with age and comorbidities. The high incidence of allograft dysfunction was associated with a wide range of specific histologic lesions and high rates of sequelae and graft loss. Seroconversion was high and the persistence of viral shedding deserves further studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Kidney Transplantation , Postoperative Complications , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Progression , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Prognosis , Prospective Studies
3.
Transplantation ; 105(7): 1405-1422, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706459

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has raised concerns for programs overseeing donation and transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs (CTO) that this virus might be transmissible by transfusion or transplantation. Transplant recipients are considered particularly vulnerable to pathogens because of immunosuppression, and SARS-CoV-2 is likely to generate complications if contracted. Several signs and symptoms observed in COVID-19 positive patients reflect damage to multiple organs and tissues, raising the possibility of extrapulmonary SARS-CoV-2 infections and risk of transmission. At the beginning of the pandemic, a consensus has emerged not to consider COVID-19 positive patients as potential living or deceased donors, resulting in a global decrease in transplantation procedures. Medical decision-making at the time of organ allocation must consider safely alongside the survival advantages offered by transplantation. To address the risk of transmission by transplantation, this review summarizes the published cases of transplantation of cells or organs from donors infected with SARS-CoV-2 until January 2021 and assesses the current state of knowledge for the detection of this virus in different biologic specimens, cells, tissues, and organs. Evidence collected to date raises the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 infection and replication in some CTO, which makes it impossible to exclude transmission through transplantation. However, most studies focused on evaluating transmission under laboratory conditions with inconsistent findings, rendering the comparison of results difficult. Improved standardization of donors and CTO screening practices, along with a systematic follow-up of transplant recipients could facilitate the assessment of SARS-CoV-2 transmission risk by transplantation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Donor Selection/methods , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Organ Transplantation/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Risk
4.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 23(1): 64, 2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A higher mortality and morbidity rate has been reported in COVID-19 patients undergoing surgery. To reduce the morbidity and mortality rate in COVID-19 patients undergoing orthopedic procedures, we aimed to increase the threshold for surgical planning. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, COVID-19 patients who underwent elective or emergent orthopedic surgery in three orthopedic surgery centers from February 2020 to September 2020 were included. In this period, 6751 patients were scheduled for orthopedic surgery. To increase surgical threshold planning, all patients with grade 5 of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification and patients with COVID-19 related moderate to severe pulmonary involvement were identified as high-risk patients and were excluded. RESULTS: 35 deaths occurred during the study. The frequency of deaths was significantly higher in patients with COVID-19, 6 (9.4%) than patients without COVID-19, 29 (0. 43%). The average hospitalization stay was 12.8 ± 12.1 days. The odds ratio (OR) for death was significantly higher in patients with COVID-19 than patients without COVID-19. [OR: 8.13, Confidence interval 95% (CI95%) (5.02-11.25), P: 0.001]. Four (6.3%) COVID-19-associated complications were recorded in this series that all were respiratory failure requiring unexpected postoperative ventilation. Twenty surgical complications (31.3%) were recorded. The odds ratio for ICU admission was significantly higher in patients with COVID-19 than patients without COVID-19. [OR: 5.46, CI 95% (2.68-8.68), P: 0.001]. CONCLUSIONS: An increased threshold for orthopedic surgery is suggested for COVID-19 patients with a mortality rate of 9.3%, which is less than the mortality rate in other studies. Level of evidence III.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures , Humans , Orthopedic Procedures/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Cornea ; 41(2): 224-231, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625425

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of symptomatic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection after corneal transplantation surgery, with cataract surgeries as controls, and the impact of the novel coronavirus disease pandemic in the clinical and surgical complications of corneal transplantation and cataract surgeries. METHODS: A retrospective matched case-control study of 480 consecutive individuals who underwent surgery at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute between May 2020 and November 2020. A total of 240 patients who underwent corneal transplantation with tissue obtained from the Florida Lions Eye Bank were age, race, ethnicity, and sex matched with 240 patients who underwent cataract surgery during the same day and by the same surgical team. Only the first corneal transplant or cataract surgery during this period was considered for each individual. All donors and recipients were deemed SARS-CoV-2 negative by a nasopharyngeal polymerase chain reaction test before surgery. Postoperative SARS-CoV-2 infections were defined as previously SARS-CoV-2(-) individuals who developed symptoms or had a positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction test during the first postoperative month. RESULTS: Mean age, sex, race, and ethnicity were similar between groups. There were no differences between the corneal transplant and cataract groups in the rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection before (5.8% vs. 7.5%, P= 0.6) or after surgery (2.9% vs. 2.9%, P = 1). The rates of postoperative complications did not increase during the pandemic, compared with previously reported ranges. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, postoperative SARS-CoV-2 infection was similar for individuals undergoing corneal transplantation or cataract surgery. Further research is required to evaluate the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 through corneal tissue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cataract Extraction , Corneal Transplantation , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Case-Control Studies , Eye Banks/statistics & numerical data , Female , Florida/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Tissue Donors/statistics & numerical data , Transplant Recipients/statistics & numerical data
6.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 21(1): 592, 2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566507

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 and Fontan physiology have each been associated with an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), however little is known about the risks and potential consequences of having both. CASE PRESENTATION: A 51 year old male with tricuspid atresia status post Fontan and extracardiac Glenn shunt, atrial flutter, and sinus sick syndrome presented with phlegmasia cerulea dolens (PCD) of the left lower extremity in spite of supratherapeutic INR in the context of symptomatic COVID-10 pneumonia. He was treated with single session, catheter directed mechanical thrombectomy that was well-tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: This report of acute PCD despite therapeutic anticoagulation with a Vitamin K antagonist, managed with emergent mechanical thrombectomy, calls to attention the importance of altered flow dynamics in COVID positive patients with Fontan circulation that may compound these independent risk factors for developing deep venous thrombosis with the potential for even higher morbidity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fontan Procedure , Gangrene , Mechanical Thrombolysis , Postoperative Complications , Thrombophlebitis , Tricuspid Atresia , Warfarin/therapeutic use , Amputation/methods , Atrial Flutter/drug therapy , Atrial Flutter/etiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Fontan Procedure/adverse effects , Fontan Procedure/methods , Gangrene/etiology , Gangrene/surgery , Heart Defects, Congenital/surgery , Humans , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Lower Extremity/pathology , Lower Extremity/surgery , Male , Mechanical Thrombolysis/adverse effects , Mechanical Thrombolysis/methods , Middle Aged , Phlebography/methods , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/physiopathology , Postoperative Complications/surgery , Sick Sinus Syndrome/diagnosis , Sick Sinus Syndrome/etiology , Thrombophlebitis/diagnosis , Thrombophlebitis/etiology , Thrombophlebitis/surgery , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Treatment Outcome , Tricuspid Atresia/etiology , Tricuspid Atresia/surgery
7.
J Surg Oncol ; 125(4): 564-569, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525470

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic, with high rate of asymptomatic infections and increased perioperative complications, prompted widespread adoption of screening methods. We analyzed the incidence of asymptomatic infection and perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing cancer surgery. We also studied the impact on subsequent cancer treatment in those with COVID-19. METHODS: All patients who underwent elective and emergency cancer surgery from April to September 2020 were included. After screening for symptoms, a preoperative test was performed from nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs before the procedure. Patients were followed up for 30 days postoperatively and complications were noted. RESULTS: 2108 asymptomatic patients were tested, of which 200 (9.5%) tested positive. Of those who tested positive, 140 (70%) underwent the planned surgery at a median of 30 days from testing positive, and 20 (14.3%) had ≥ Grade III complications. Forty (20%) patients did not receive the intended treatment; 110 patients were retested in the Postoperative period, and 41 (37.3%) tested positive and 9(22%) patients died of COVID-related complications. CONCLUSION: Routine preoperative testing for COVID-19 helps to segregate patients with asymptomatic infection. Higher complications occur in those who develop COVID-19 in postoperative period. Prolonged delay in surgery after COVID infection may influence planned treatment.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/surgery , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Preoperative Care , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Incidence , India/epidemiology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Young Adult
8.
Ann Surg ; 275(2): 247-251, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522451

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report the 30-day outcomes of patients with perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection undergoing surgery in the USA. BACKGROUND: Uncertainty regarding the postoperative risks of patients with SARS-CoV-2 exists. METHODS: As part of the COVIDSurg multicenter study, all patients aged ≥17 years undergoing surgery between January 1 and June 30, 2020 with perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection in 70 hospitals across 27 states were included. The primary outcomes were 30-day mortality and pulmonary complications. Multivariable analyses (adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, and procedure characteristics) were performed to identify predictors of mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1581 patients were included; more than half of them were males (n = 822, 52.0%) and older than 50 years (n = 835, 52.8%). Most procedures (n = 1261, 79.8%) were emergent, and laparotomies (n = 538, 34.1%). The mortality and pulmonary complication rates were 11.0 and 39.5%, respectively. Independent predictors of mortality included age ≥70 years (odds ratio 2.46, 95% confidence interval [1.65-3.69]), male sex (2.26 [1.53-3.35]), ASA grades 3-5 (3.08 [1.60-5.95]), emergent surgery (2.44 [1.31-4.54]), malignancy (2.97 [1.58-5.57]), respiratory comorbidities (2.08 [1.30-3.32]), and higher Revised Cardiac Risk Index (1.20 [1.02-1.41]). While statewide elective cancelation orders were not associated with a lower mortality, a sub-analysis showed it to be associated with lower mortality in those who underwent elective surgery (0.14 [0.03-0.61]). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection have a significantly high risk for postoperative complications, especially elderly males. Postponing elective surgery and adopting non-operative management, when reasonable, should be considered in the USA during the pandemic peaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Elective Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Age Factors , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Time-to-Treatment , United States
9.
Ann Surg ; 275(2): 242-246, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522450

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between the timing of surgery relative to the development of Covid-19 and the risks of postoperative complications. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: It is unknown whether patients who recovered from Covid-19 and then underwent a major elective operation have an increased risk of developing postoperative complications. METHODS: The risk of postoperative complications for patients with Covid-19 undergoing 18 major types of elective operations in the Covid-19 Research Database was evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. Patients were grouped by time of surgery relative to SARS-CoV-2 infection; that is, surgery performed: (1) before January 1, 2020 ("pre-Covid-19"), (2) 0 to 4 weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection ("peri-Covid-19"), (3) 4 to 8 weeks after infection ("early post-Covid-19"), and (4) ≥8 weeks after infection ("late post-Covid-19"). RESULTS: Of the 5479 patients who met study criteria, patients with peri-Covid-19 had an elevated risk of developing postoperative pneumonia [adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 6.46; 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.06-10.27], respiratory failure (aOR, 3.36; 95% CI: 2.22-5.10), pulmonary embolism (aOR, 2.73; 95% CI: 1.35-5.53), and sepsis (aOR, 3.67; 95% CI: 2.18-6.16) when compared to pre-Covid-19 patients. Early post-Covid-19 patients had an increased risk of developing postoperative pneumonia when compared to pre-Covid-19 patients (aOR, 2.44; 95% CI: 1.20-4.96). Late post-Covid-19 patients did not have an increased risk of postoperative complications when compared to pre-Covid-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Major, elective surgery 0 to 4 weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications. Surgery performed 4 to 8 weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection is still associated with an increased risk of postoperative pneumonia, whereas surgery 8 weeks after Covid-19 diagnosis is not associated with increased complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Elective Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Time-to-Treatment , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/diagnosis , United States
10.
Heart Rhythm ; 19(2): 206-216, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482622

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) implantation rates as well as the clinical and procedural characteristics and outcomes in patients with known active coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to gather information regarding CIED procedures during active COVID-19, performed with personal protective equipment, based on an international survey. METHODS: Fifty-three centers from 13 countries across 4 continents provided information on 166 patients with known active COVID-19 who underwent a CIED procedure. RESULTS: The CIED procedure rate in 133,655 hospitalized COVID-19 patients ranged from 0 to 16.2 per 1000 patients (P <.001). Most devices were implanted due to high-degree/complete atrioventricular block (112 [67.5%]) or sick sinus syndrome (31 [18.7%]). Of the 166 patients in the study survey, the 30-day complication rate was 13.9% and the 180-day mortality rate was 9.6%. One patient had a fatal outcome as a direct result of the procedure. Differences in patient and procedural characteristics and outcomes were found between Europe and North America. An older population (76.6 vs 66 years; P <.001) with a nonsignificant higher complication rate (16.5% vs 7.7%; P = .2) was observed in Europe vs North America, whereas higher rates of critically ill patients (33.3% vs 3.3%; P <.001) and mortality (26.9% vs 5%; P = .002) were observed in North America vs Europe. CONCLUSION: CIED procedure rates during known active COVID-19 disease varied greatly, from 0 to 16.2 per 1000 hospitalized COVID-19 patients worldwide. Patients with active COVID-19 infection who underwent CIED implantation had high complication and mortality rates. Operators should take these risks into consideration before proceeding with CIED implantation in active COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Atrioventricular Block , COVID-19 , Infection Control , Postoperative Complications , Prosthesis Implantation , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sick Sinus Syndrome , Aged , Atrioventricular Block/epidemiology , Atrioventricular Block/therapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Defibrillators, Implantable/statistics & numerical data , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pacemaker, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Prosthesis Implantation/adverse effects , Prosthesis Implantation/instrumentation , Prosthesis Implantation/mortality , Risk Factors , Sick Sinus Syndrome/epidemiology , Sick Sinus Syndrome/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e370-e381, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440404

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has considerably affected surgical practice. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the pandemic on neurosurgical practice and the safety of the resumption of elective procedures through implementing screening protocols in a high-volume academic public center in Iran, as one of the countries severely affected by the pandemic. METHODS: This unmatched case-control study compared 2 populations of patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures between June 1, 2019 and September 1, 2019 and the same period in 2020. In the prospective part of the study, patients who underwent elective procedures were tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection postoperatively to evaluate the viability of our screening protocol. RESULTS: Elective and emergency procedures showed significant reduction during the pandemic (59.4%, n = 168 vs. 71.3%, n = 380) and increase (28.7%, n = 153 vs. 40.6%, n = 115, respectively; P = 0.003). The proportional distribution of neurosurgical categories remained unchanged during the pandemic. Poisson regression showed that the reduction in total daily admissions and some categories, including spine, trauma, oncology, and infection were significantly correlated with the pandemic. Among patients who underwent elective procedures, 0 (0.0%) and 26 (16.25%) had positive test results on days 30 and 60 postoperatively, respectively. Overall mortality was comparable between the pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 periods, yet patients with concurrent SARS-CoV-2 infection showed substantially higher mortality (65%). CONCLUSIONS: By implementing safety and screening protocols with proper resource allocation, the emergency care capacity can be maintained and the risk minimized of hospital-acquired SARS-CoV-2 infection, complications, and mortality among neurosurgical patients during the pandemic. Similarly, for elective procedures, according to available resources, hospital beds can be allocated for patients with a higher risk of delayed hospitalization and those who are concerned about the risk of hospital-acquired infection can be reassured.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19 Testing , Case-Control Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures/mortality , Feasibility Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgical Procedures , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
12.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2121867, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1375583

ABSTRACT

Importance: Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) occurring after cardiac surgery is associated with adverse outcomes. Whether POAF persists beyond discharge is not well defined. Objective: To determine whether continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring enhances detection of POAF among cardiac surgical patients during the first 30 days after hospital discharge compared with usual care. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study is an investigator-initiated, open-label, multicenter, randomized clinical trial conducted at 10 Canadian centers. Enrollment spanned from March 2017 to March 2020, with follow-up through September 11, 2020. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, enrollment stopped on July 17, 2020, at which point 85% of the proposed sample size was enrolled. Cardiac surgical patients with CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack, vascular disease, age 65-74 years, female sex) score greater than or equal to 4 or greater than or equal to 2 with risk factors for POAF, no history of preoperative AF, and POAF lasting less than 24 hours during hospitalization were enrolled. Interventions: The intervention group underwent continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring with wearable, patch-based monitors for 30 days after randomization. Monitoring was not mandated in the usual care group within 30 days after randomization. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was cumulative AF and/or atrial flutter lasting 6 minutes or longer detected by continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring or by a 12-lead electrocardiogram within 30 days of randomization. Prespecified secondary outcomes included cumulative AF lasting 6 hours or longer and 24 hours or longer within 30 days of randomization, death, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, non-central nervous system thromboembolism, major bleeding, and oral anticoagulation prescription. Results: Of the 336 patients randomized (163 patients in the intervention group and 173 patients in the usual care group; mean [SD] age, 67.4 [8.1] years; 73 women [21.7%]; median [interquartile range] CHA2DS2-VASc score, 4.0 [3.0-4.0] points), 307 (91.4%) completed the trial. In the intent-to-treat analysis, the primary end point occurred in 32 patients (19.6%) in the intervention group vs 3 patients (1.7%) in the usual care group (absolute difference, 17.9%; 95% CI, 11.5%-24.3%; P < .001). AF lasting 6 hours or longer was detected in 14 patients (8.6%) in the intervention group vs 0 patients in the usual care group (absolute difference, 8.6%; 95% CI, 4.3%-12.9%; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In post-cardiac surgical patients at high risk of stroke, no preoperative AF history, and AF lasting less than 24 hours during hospitalization, continuous monitoring revealed a significant increase in the rate of POAF after discharge that would otherwise not be detected by usual care. Studies are needed to examine whether these patients will benefit from oral anticoagulation therapy. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02793895.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation/diagnosis , Atrial Flutter/diagnosis , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Electrocardiography, Ambulatory/methods , Mass Screening/methods , Patient Discharge , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Aged , Atrial Fibrillation/etiology , Atrial Flutter/etiology , COVID-19 , Canada , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , Electrocardiography , Female , Hemorrhage , Hospitalization , Humans , Intention to Treat Analysis , Ischemic Attack, Transient , Male , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Stroke , Thromboembolism
13.
Anesth Analg ; 133(2): 483-490, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with high perioperative morbidity and mortality among adults. The incidence and severity of anesthetic complications in children with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is unknown. We hypothesized that there would be an increased incidence of intra- and postoperative complications in children with SARS-CoV-2 infection as compared to those with negative testing. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study analyzing complications for children <18 years of age who underwent anesthesia between April 28 and September 30, 2020 at a large, academic pediatric hospital. Each child with a positive SARS-CoV-2 test within the prior 10 days was matched to a patient with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test based on American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status, age, gender, and procedure. Children who were intubated before the procedure, underwent organ transplant surgery, or had severe COVID-19 were excluded. The primary outcome was the risk difference of a composite of intra- or postoperative respiratory complications in children positive for SARS-CoV-2 compared to those with negative testing. Secondarily, we used logistic regression to determine the odds ratio for respiratory complications before and after adjustment using propensity scores weighting to adjust for possible confounders. Other secondary outcomes included neurologic, cardiovascular, hematologic, and renal complications, unanticipated postoperative admission to the intensive care unit, length of hospital stay, and mortality. RESULTS: During the study period, 9812 general anesthetics that had a preoperative SARS-CoV-2 test were identified. Sixty encounters occurred in patients who had positive SARS-CoV-2 testing preoperatively and 51 were included for analysis. The matched controls cohort included 99 encounters. A positive SARS-CoV-2 test was associated with a higher incidence of respiratory complications (11.8% vs 1.0%; risk difference 10.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-19.8; P = .003). After adjustment, the odds ratio for respiratory complications was 14.37 (95% CI, 1.59-130.39; P = .02) for SARS-CoV-2-positive children as compared to controls. There was no occurrence of acute respiratory distress syndrome, postoperative pneumonia, or perioperative mortality in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric patients with nonsevere SARS-CoV-2 infection had higher rates of perianesthetic respiratory complications than matched controls with negative testing. However, severe morbidity was rare and there were no mortalities. The incidence of complications was similar to previously published rates of perianesthetic complications in the setting of an upper respiratory tract infection. This risk persisted after adjustment for preoperative upper respiratory symptoms, suggesting an increased risk in symptomatic or asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Intraoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Adolescent , Age Factors , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Intraoperative Complications/diagnosis , Intraoperative Complications/mortality , Intraoperative Complications/therapy , Length of Stay , Male , Patient Admission , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Texas/epidemiology , Time Factors
14.
Transplantation ; 105(7): 1445-1448, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280174

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The optimal duration of transmission-based precautions among immunocompromised patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is unknown. METHODS: Retrospective review of patients with solid organ transplant with positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction result from nasopharyngeal specimens admitted to the hospital between March 13, 2020 and May 15, 2020. RESULTS: Twenty-one percent of solid organ transplant recipients with positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction detected ≥20 d after symptom onset (or after first positive test among asymptomatic individuals) had a low cycle threshold (ie, high viral load). The majority of these patients were asymptomatic or symptomatically improved. CONCLUSIONS: Solid organ transplant recipients may have prolonged high viral burden of SARS-CoV-2. Further data are needed to understand whether cycle threshold data can help inform strategies for prevention of healthcare-associated transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and for appropriate discontinuation of transmission-based precautions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/virology , Organ Transplantation , Postoperative Complications/virology , Viral Load , Adult , Aged , Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies
15.
Transplantation ; 105(7): 1433-1444, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228580

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) fatality rate is high among kidney transplant recipients. Among survivors, kidney outcomes, seroconversion, and persistence of viral shedding are unexplored. METHODS: Single-center prospective cohort study including data from kidney transplant recipients with confirmed COVID-19 between March 20, 2020 and July 31, 2020. Outcomes were adjudicated until August 31, 2020 or the date of death. RESULTS: There were 491 patients with COVID-19 among the 11 875 recipients in follow-up. The majority were middle aged with ≥1 comorbidities. Thirty-one percent were treated at home, and 69% required hospitalization. Among the hospitalized, 61% needed intensive care, 75% presented allograft dysfunction, and 46% needed dialysis. The overall 28-day fatality rate was 22% and among hospitalized patients it was 41%. Age (odds ratio, 3.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-5.09), diabetes mellitus (odds ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.72), and cardiac disease (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.68) were independent factors for death. Among the 351 survivors, 19% sustained renal graft dysfunction, and there were 13 (4%) graft losses. Biopsy (n = 20) findings were diverse but decisive to guide treatment and estimate prognosis. Seroconversion was observed in 79% of the survivors and was associated with disease severity. Persistence of viral shedding was observed in 21% of the patients without detectable clinical implications. CONCLUSIONS: This prospective cohort analysis confirms the high 28-day fatality rate of COVID-19, associated primarily with age and comorbidities. The high incidence of allograft dysfunction was associated with a wide range of specific histologic lesions and high rates of sequelae and graft loss. Seroconversion was high and the persistence of viral shedding deserves further studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Kidney Transplantation , Postoperative Complications , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Progression , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Prognosis , Prospective Studies
16.
Bone Joint J ; 103-B(4): 681-688, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166984

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The primary aim was to assess the rate of postoperative COVID-19 following hip and knee arthroplasty performed in March 2020 in the UK. The secondary aims were to assess whether there were clinical factors associated with COVID-19 status, the mortality rate of patients with COVID-19, and the rate of potential COVID-19 in patients not presenting to healthcare services. METHODS: A multicentre retrospective study was conducted of patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (1 March 2020 to 31 March 2020) with a minimum of 60 days follow-up. Patient demographics, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, procedure type, primary or revision, length of stay (LOS), COVID-19 test status, and postoperative mortality were recorded. A subgroup of patients (n = 211) who had not presented to healthcare services after discharge were contacted and questioned as to whether they had symptoms of COVID-19. RESULTS: Five (0.5%) of 1,073 patients who underwent hip or knee arthroplasty tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 postoperatively. When adjusting for confounding factors, increasing LOS (p = 0.022) was the only significant factor associated with developing COVID-19 following surgery and a stay greater than three days was a reliable predictor with an area under the curve of 81% (p = 0.018). There were three (0.3%) deaths in the study cohort and the overall mortality rate attributable to COVID-19 was 0.09% (n = 1/1,073), with one (20%) of the five patients with COVID-19 dying postoperatively. Of the 211 patients contacted, two had symptoms within two to 14 days postoperatively with a positive predictive value of 31% and it was therefore estimated that one patient may have had undiagnosed COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The rate of postoperative COVID-19 was 0.5% and may have been as high as 1% when accounting for those patients not presenting to healthcare services, which was similar to the estimated population prevalence during the study period. The overall mortality rate secondary to COVID-19 was low (0.09%), however the mortality rate for those patients developing COVID-19 was 20%. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2021;103-B(4):681-688.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Audit , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sensitivity and Specificity , Survival Analysis , United Kingdom/epidemiology
17.
Ann Transplant ; 26: e929279, 2021 Mar 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154830

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has been an ongoing pandemic since December 2019. Unfortunately, kidney transplant recipients are a high-risk group during the disease course, and scientific data are still limited in this patient group. Beyond the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs, pharmacological immunosuppression may also alter the infection response in the COVID-19 course. The effects of immunosuppressive agents on the development and process of infection should not be decided only by determining how potent they are and how much they suppress the immune system; it is also thought that the direct effect of the virus, increased oxidative stress, and cytokine storm play a role in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 disease. There are data about immunosuppressive drugs like calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) or mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) therapy related to their beneficial effects during any infection course. Limited data suggest that the use of CNI or mTORi may have beneficial effects on the process. In this hypothetical review, the probable impacts of CNI and mTORi on the pathogenesis of the COVID-19 were investigated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Calcineurin Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Kidney Transplantation , Postoperative Complications/immunology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Adaptive Immunity/drug effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , Calcineurin Inhibitors/pharmacology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Graft Rejection/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/pharmacology , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/immunology , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/virology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors
18.
Transplantation ; 105(7): 1405-1422, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135936

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has raised concerns for programs overseeing donation and transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs (CTO) that this virus might be transmissible by transfusion or transplantation. Transplant recipients are considered particularly vulnerable to pathogens because of immunosuppression, and SARS-CoV-2 is likely to generate complications if contracted. Several signs and symptoms observed in COVID-19 positive patients reflect damage to multiple organs and tissues, raising the possibility of extrapulmonary SARS-CoV-2 infections and risk of transmission. At the beginning of the pandemic, a consensus has emerged not to consider COVID-19 positive patients as potential living or deceased donors, resulting in a global decrease in transplantation procedures. Medical decision-making at the time of organ allocation must consider safely alongside the survival advantages offered by transplantation. To address the risk of transmission by transplantation, this review summarizes the published cases of transplantation of cells or organs from donors infected with SARS-CoV-2 until January 2021 and assesses the current state of knowledge for the detection of this virus in different biologic specimens, cells, tissues, and organs. Evidence collected to date raises the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 infection and replication in some CTO, which makes it impossible to exclude transmission through transplantation. However, most studies focused on evaluating transmission under laboratory conditions with inconsistent findings, rendering the comparison of results difficult. Improved standardization of donors and CTO screening practices, along with a systematic follow-up of transplant recipients could facilitate the assessment of SARS-CoV-2 transmission risk by transplantation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Donor Selection/methods , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Organ Transplantation/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Risk
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(5): e24409, 2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125185

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus seems to contribute significantly to increased postoperative complications and mortality after emergency surgical procedures. Additionally, the fear of COVID-19 contagion delays the consultation of patients, resulting in the deterioration of their acute diseases by the time of consultation. In the specific case of urgent digestive surgery patients, both factors significantly worsen the postoperative course and prognosis. Main working hypothesis: infection by COVID-19 increases postoperative 30-day-mortality for any cause in patients submitted to emergency/urgent general or gastrointestinal surgery. Likewise, hospital collapse during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic increased 30-day-mortality for any cause. Hence, the main objective of this study is to estimate the cumulative incidence of mortality at 30-days-after-surgery. Secondary objectives are: to estimate the cumulative incidence of postoperative complications and to develop a specific postoperative risk propensity model for COVID-19-infected patients.A multicenter, observational retrospective cohort study (COVID-CIR-study) will be carried out in consecutive patients operated on for urgent digestive pathology. Two cohorts will be defined: the "pandemic" cohort, which will include all patients (classified as COVID-19-positive or -negative) operated on for emergency digestive pathology during the months of March to June 2020; and the "control" cohort, which will include all patients operated on for emergency digestive pathology during the months of March to June 2019. Information will be gathered on demographic characteristics, clinical and analytical parameters, scores on the usual prognostic scales for quality management in a General Surgery service (POSSUM, P-POSSUM and LUCENTUM scores), prognostic factors applicable to all patients, specific prognostic factors for patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, postoperative morbidity and mortality (at 30 and 90 postoperative days). The main objective is to estimate the cumulative incidence of mortality at 30 days after surgery. As secondary objectives, to estimate the cumulative incidence of postoperative complications and to develop a specific postoperative risk propensity model for SARS-CoV-2 infected patients.The protocol (version1.0, April 20th 2020) was approved by the local Institutional Review Board (Ethic-and-Clinical-Investigation-Committee, code PR169/20, date 05/05/20). The study findings will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant national and international scientific meetings.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04479150 (July 21, 2020).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Digestive System Diseases , Digestive System Surgical Procedures , Emergency Treatment , Infection Control , Postoperative Complications , Time-to-Treatment , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Digestive System Diseases/diagnosis , Digestive System Diseases/epidemiology , Digestive System Diseases/mortality , Digestive System Diseases/surgery , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/methods , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/mortality , Emergencies/epidemiology , Emergency Treatment/adverse effects , Emergency Treatment/methods , Emergency Treatment/mortality , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mortality , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Observational Studies as Topic , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Research Design , Risk Assessment/methods
20.
Transpl Int ; 34(4): 721-731, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119269

ABSTRACT

Available data on clinical presentation and mortality of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) in heart transplant (HT) recipients remain limited. We report a case series of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in 39 HT recipients from 3 French heart transplant centres (mean age 54.4 ± 14.8 years; 66.7% males). Hospital admission was required for 35 (89.7%) cases including 14/39 (35.9%) cases being admitted in intensive care unit. Immunosuppressive medications were reduced or discontinued in 74.4% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 54 (19-80) days, death and death or need for mechanical ventilation occurred in 25.6% and 33.3% of patients, respectively. Elevated C-reactive protein and lung involvement ≥50% on chest computed tomography (CT) at admission were associated with an increased risk of death or need for mechanical ventilation. Mortality rate from March to June in the entire 3-centre HT recipient cohort was 56% higher in 2020 compared to the time-matched 2019 cohort (2% vs. 1.28%, P = 0.15). In a meta-analysis including 4 studies, pre-existing diabetes mellitus (OR 3.60, 95% CI 1.43-9.06, I2  = 0%, P = 0.006) and chronic kidney disease stage III or higher (OR 3.79, 95% CI 1.39-10.31, I2  = 0%, P = 0.009) were associated with increased mortality. These findings highlight the aggressive clinical course of COVID-19 in HT recipients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Heart Transplantation , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
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