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2.
J Card Surg ; 37(5): 1161-1167, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714238

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been and will continue to be a challenge to the healthcare system worldwide. In this context, we aimed to discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the diagnosis, timing, and prognosis of surgical treatment for active infective endocarditis (IE) during the pandemic and share our coping strategy. METHODS: A total of 39 patients were admitted for active IE in the year 2020. The number of the same period last year was 50. Medical information of these two groups was extracted from our surgical database. Data were compared between the two groups and differences with or without statistical significance were discussed. RESULTS: In the pandemic year, we admitted fewer transferred patients (64.1% vs. 80%, p = .094). Timespan for diagnosis were prolonged (60 vs. 34.5 days, p = .081). More patients were admitted in emergency (41% vs. 20%, p = .030) More patients had heart failure (74.4% vs. 40%, p = .001), sepsis (69.2% vs. 42.0%, p = .018), or cardiogenic shock (25.6% vs. 8.0%, p = .038). Overall surgical risk (EuroSCORE II) was higher (4.15% vs. 3.24%, p = .019) and more commando surgery was performed (7.7% vs. 2.0%, p = .441). However, we did not see more postoperative complications, and early mortality was not worse either (0 vs. 4%, p = .502). CONCLUSIONS: The negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the clinical practice of surgical treatment for active IE was multifaceted. However, with the preservation of the effectiveness of multidisciplinary IE surgical team, the early outcomes were comparable with those in the normal years.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Endocarditis/surgery , Endocarditis, Bacterial/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
3.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 22(1): 46, 2022 02 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690973

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data to detail the perioperative anesthetic management and the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications among patients requiring an anesthetic procedure while being SARS-CoV-2 positive or suspected. METHODS: An observational multicenter cohort study was performed including consecutive patients who were SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected and who underwent scheduled and emergency anesthesia between March 17 and May 26, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 187 patients underwent anesthesia with SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected, with ultimately 135 (72.2%) patients positive and 52 (27.8%) negative. The median SOFA score was 2 [0; 5], and the median ARISCAT score was 49 [36; 67]. The major respiratory complications rate was 48.7% (n = 91) with 40.4% (n = 21) and 51.9% (n = 70) in the SARS-CoV-2-negative and -positive groups, respectively (p = 0.21). Among both positive and negative groups, patients with a high ARISCAT risk score (> 44) had a higher risk of presenting major respiratory complications (p < 0.01 and p = 0.1, respectively). DISCUSSION: When comparing SARS-COV-2-positive and -negative patients, no significant difference was found regarding the rate of postoperative complications, while baseline characteristics strongly impact these outcomes. This finding suggests that patients should be scheduled for anesthetic procedures based on their overall risk of postoperative complication, and not just based on their SARS-CoV-2 status.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , COVID-19/complications , Aged , Anesthesia/adverse effects , Cohort Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Perioperative Care , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Registries , Respiratory Tract Diseases/complications , Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
4.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(2): 103393, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676388

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly expanded the use of telemedicine in healthcare. Surgical thyroid and parathyroid diseases are uniquely suited for comprehensive telemedicine. The objective of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of telemedicine with in-person preoperative visits in patients undergoing thyroid and parathyroid surgery. METHODS: Prospective cohort study of patients undergoing thyroid and parathyroid surgery at a tertiary care center in a COVID-19 hotspot from March 2020 to October 2020. Patients were divided into a telemedicine cohort, with preoperative consultation and surgical decision-making conducted via telemedicine, and a conventional in-person cohort. RESULTS: Of 94 patients, 28 were enrolled in the telemedicine cohort and 66 were enrolled in the conventional cohort. Telemedicine patients were more likely to have parathyroid disease (50% versus 24%, p = 0.02) compared with the conventional cohort, but there was no significant difference in surgery for malignancy (43% versus 56%, p = 0.27). There were no significant differences in surgical outcomes or postoperative complications between cohorts, including intraoperative blood loss (19.4 mL versus 35.5 mL, p = 0.06), postoperative length of stay (1.3 days versus 1.2 days, p = 0.93), persistent hypocalcemia (3.6% versus 0%, p = 0.30), and true vocal fold paresis (0% versus 4.5%, p = 0.55). CONCLUSIONS: With careful selection, many patients undergoing thyroid and parathyroid surgery may be safely treated using comprehensive telemedicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parathyroidectomy , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thyroid Gland , Thyroidectomy
5.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 23(1): 64, 2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A higher mortality and morbidity rate has been reported in COVID-19 patients undergoing surgery. To reduce the morbidity and mortality rate in COVID-19 patients undergoing orthopedic procedures, we aimed to increase the threshold for surgical planning. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, COVID-19 patients who underwent elective or emergent orthopedic surgery in three orthopedic surgery centers from February 2020 to September 2020 were included. In this period, 6751 patients were scheduled for orthopedic surgery. To increase surgical threshold planning, all patients with grade 5 of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification and patients with COVID-19 related moderate to severe pulmonary involvement were identified as high-risk patients and were excluded. RESULTS: 35 deaths occurred during the study. The frequency of deaths was significantly higher in patients with COVID-19, 6 (9.4%) than patients without COVID-19, 29 (0. 43%). The average hospitalization stay was 12.8 ± 12.1 days. The odds ratio (OR) for death was significantly higher in patients with COVID-19 than patients without COVID-19. [OR: 8.13, Confidence interval 95% (CI95%) (5.02-11.25), P: 0.001]. Four (6.3%) COVID-19-associated complications were recorded in this series that all were respiratory failure requiring unexpected postoperative ventilation. Twenty surgical complications (31.3%) were recorded. The odds ratio for ICU admission was significantly higher in patients with COVID-19 than patients without COVID-19. [OR: 5.46, CI 95% (2.68-8.68), P: 0.001]. CONCLUSIONS: An increased threshold for orthopedic surgery is suggested for COVID-19 patients with a mortality rate of 9.3%, which is less than the mortality rate in other studies. Level of evidence III.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures , Humans , Orthopedic Procedures/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Cornea ; 41(2): 224-231, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625425

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of symptomatic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection after corneal transplantation surgery, with cataract surgeries as controls, and the impact of the novel coronavirus disease pandemic in the clinical and surgical complications of corneal transplantation and cataract surgeries. METHODS: A retrospective matched case-control study of 480 consecutive individuals who underwent surgery at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute between May 2020 and November 2020. A total of 240 patients who underwent corneal transplantation with tissue obtained from the Florida Lions Eye Bank were age, race, ethnicity, and sex matched with 240 patients who underwent cataract surgery during the same day and by the same surgical team. Only the first corneal transplant or cataract surgery during this period was considered for each individual. All donors and recipients were deemed SARS-CoV-2 negative by a nasopharyngeal polymerase chain reaction test before surgery. Postoperative SARS-CoV-2 infections were defined as previously SARS-CoV-2(-) individuals who developed symptoms or had a positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction test during the first postoperative month. RESULTS: Mean age, sex, race, and ethnicity were similar between groups. There were no differences between the corneal transplant and cataract groups in the rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection before (5.8% vs. 7.5%, P= 0.6) or after surgery (2.9% vs. 2.9%, P = 1). The rates of postoperative complications did not increase during the pandemic, compared with previously reported ranges. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, postoperative SARS-CoV-2 infection was similar for individuals undergoing corneal transplantation or cataract surgery. Further research is required to evaluate the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 through corneal tissue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cataract Extraction , Corneal Transplantation , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Case-Control Studies , Eye Banks/statistics & numerical data , Female , Florida/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Tissue Donors/statistics & numerical data , Transplant Recipients/statistics & numerical data
7.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 22(1): 19, 2022 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622211

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During a global crisis like the current COVID-19 pandemic, delayed admission to hospital in cases of emergent medical illness may lead to serious adverse consequences. We aimed to determine whether such delayed admission affected the severity of an inflammatory process regarding acute appendicitis, and its convalescence. METHODS: In a retrospective observational cohort case-control study, we analyzed the medical data of 60 patients who were emergently and consecutively admitted to our hospital due to acute appendicitis as established by clinical presentation and imaging modalities, during the period of the COVID-19 pandemic (our study group). We matched a statistically control group consisting of 97 patients who were admitted during a previous 12-month period for the same etiology. All underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. The main study parameters included intraoperative findings (validated by histopathology), duration of abdominal pain prior to admission, hospital stay and postoperative convalescence (reflecting the consequences of delay in diagnosis and surgery). RESULTS: The mean duration of abdominal pain until surgery was significantly longer in the study group. The rate of advanced appendicitis (suppurative and gangrenous appendicitis as well as peri-appendicular abscess) was greater in the study than in the control group (38.3 vs. 21.6%, 23.3 vs. 16.5%, and 5 vs. 1% respectively), as well as mean hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: A global crisis like the current viral pandemic may significantly affect emergent admissions to hospital (as in case of acute appendicitis), leading to delayed surgical interventions and its consequences.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis , COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Acute Disease , Appendectomy , Appendicitis/diagnosis , Appendicitis/epidemiology , Appendicitis/surgery , Case-Control Studies , Delayed Diagnosis , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0262115, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595959

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Ankle fractures have continued to occur through the COVID pandemic and, regardless of patient COVID status, often need operative intervention for optimizing long-term outcomes. For healthcare optimization, patient counseling, and care planning, understanding if COVID-positive patients undergoing ankle fracture surgery are at increased risk for perioperative adverse outcomes is of interest. METHODS: The COVID-19 Research Database contains recent United States aggregated insurance claims. Patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery from April 1st, 2020 to June 15th, 2020 were identified. COVID status was identified by ICD coding. Demographics, comorbidities, and postoperative complications were extracted based on administrative data. COVID-positive versus negative patients were compared with univariate analyses. Propensity-score matching was done on the basis of age, sex, and comorbidities. Multivariate regression was then performed to identify risk factors independently associated with the occurrence of 30-day postoperative adverse events. RESULTS: In total, 9,835 patients undergoing ankle fracture surgery were identified, of which 57 (0.58%) were COVID-positive. COVID-positive ankle fracture patients demonstrated a higher prevalence of comorbidities, including: chronic kidney disease, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity (p<0.05 for each). After propensity matching and controlling for all preoperative variables, multivariate analysis found that COVID-positive patients were at increased risk of any adverse event (odds ratio [OR] = 3.89, p = 0.002), a serious adverse event (OR = 5.48, p = 0.002), and a minor adverse event (OR = 3.10, p = 0.021). DISCUSSION: COVID-positive patients will continue to present with ankle fractures requiring operative intervention. Even after propensity matching and controlling for patient factors, COVID-positive patients were found to be at increased risk of 30-day perioperative adverse events. Not only do treatment teams need to be protected from the transmission of COVID in such situations, but the increased incidence of perioperative adverse events needs to be considered.


Subject(s)
Ankle Fractures/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Open Fracture Reduction/adverse effects , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
Ann Surg ; 275(1): 31-36, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583930

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of COVID-19 vaccination on postoperative mortality, pulmonary and thrombotic complications, readmissions and hospital lengths of stay among patients undergoing surgery in the United States. BACKGROUND: While vaccination prevents COVID-19, little is known about its impact on postoperative complications. METHODS: This is a nationwide observational cohort study of all 1,255 Veterans Affairs facilities nationwide. We compared patients undergoing surgery at least 2 weeks after their second dose of the Pfizer BioNTech or Moderna vaccines, to contemporary propensity score matched controls. Primary endpoints were 30-day mortality and postoperative COVID-19 infection. Secondary endpoints were pulmonary or thrombotic complications, readmissions, and hospital lengths of stay. RESULTS: 30,681 patients met inclusion criteria. After matching, there were 3,104 in the vaccination group (1,903 received the Pfizer BioNTech, and 1,201 received the Moderna vaccine) and 7,438 controls. Full COVID-19 vaccination was associated with lower rates of postoperative 30-day COVID-19 infection (Incidence Rate Ratio and 95% confidence intervals, 0.09 [0.01,0.44]), pulmonary complications (0.54 [0.39, 0.72]), thrombotic complications (0.68 [0.46, 0.99]) and decreased hospital lengths of stay (0.78 [0.69, 0.89]). Complications were also low in vaccinated patients who tested COVID-19 positive before surgery but events were too few to detect a significant difference compared to controls. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 vaccination is associated with lower rates of postoperative morbidity. The benefit is most pronounced among individuals who have never had a COVID-19 infection before surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Matched-Pair Analysis , Middle Aged , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Poisson Distribution , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Propensity Score , Regression Analysis , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
10.
Nagoya J Med Sci ; 83(4): 715-725, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561175

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected infection control and prevention measures. We investigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on postoperative infections and infection control measures in patients underwent gastrointestinal surgery for malignancies. We retrospectively evaluated changes in clinicopathological features, frequency of alcohol-based hand sanitizer use, frequency of postoperative complications, and microbial findings among our patients in February-May in 2019 (Control group) and 2020 (Pandemic group), respectively. Surgical resection in pathological stage III or IV patients was more frequently performed in the Pandemic group than in the Control group (P = 0.02). The total length of hospitalization and preoperative hospitalization was significantly shorter in the Pandemic group (P = 0.01 and P = 0.008, respectively). During the pandemic, hand sanitizer was used by a patients for an average of 14.9±3.0 times/day during the pandemic as opposed to 9.6±3.0 times/day in 2019 (p<0.0001). Superficial surgical site infection and infectious colitis occurred less frequently during the pandemic (P = 0.04 and P = 0.0002, respectively). In Pandemic group, Enterobacter, Haemophilus, and Candida were significantly decreased in microbiological cultures (P < 0.05, P < 0.05, P = 0.02, respectively) compared with Control group. Furthermore, a significant decrease in Streptococcus from drainage cultures was observed in the Pandemic group (P < 0.05). During the COVID-19 pandemic, a decrease in nosocomial infections was observed in the presence of an increase in alcohol-based hand sanitizer use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/surgery , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/organization & administration , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/pathology , Hand Sanitizers , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Zentralbl Chir ; 146(6): 579-585, 2021 Dec.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555498

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to a major disturbance in the health care system. Many elective operations were postponed, including surgical oncology cases. Besides the need to contain hospital resources, this was also due to concerns about the safety to perform surgery during the pandemic and the impact of perioperative infections on postoperative outcomes. In this study we investigate the safety of surgery for thoracic malignancies during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed the outcome of surgery for thoracic malignancies during the first, second and third waves of the COVID-19 pandemic (from 01.01. to 30.04.2020 and from 01.01. to 30.04.2021). As a control group we included the patients who received thoracic oncology surgeries during the same period in the last 2 years before the onset of the pandemic. The primary outcome was the rate of postoperative complications. RESULTS: 236 operations were included in the pandemic group and 227 operations in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of postoperative minor complications (16.1% vs. 18.5%, p = 0.5395) or major complications (12.2% vs. 10.13 %, p = 0.5563). The risk to develop postoperative pulmonary complications was not higher in the pandemic group (odds ratio 1.193, 95% CI 0.6515-2.203, p = 0.8232). There were 5 cases with COVID-19 infection after the operation in the pandemic group. There was no difference in the rate of postoperative mortalities (2 (0.85%) vs. 1 (0.44%), p > 0.9999) There was no COVID-19 related mortality. CONCLUSION: Maintaining oncologic thoracic surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic is safe, feasible and not associated with increased risks of postoperative complications or mortalities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thoracic Neoplasms , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery
12.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(12): 3643-3647, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538650

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To study the changing trends in the morphology of cataracts at a tertiary eye care center in South India due to COVID-19 pandemic-related national lockdown. Methods: A retrospective study conducted at a tertiary eye care center in Andhra Pradesh state of South India, which included 1724 patients (1753 eyes) who underwent cataract surgery at our center during April 2019-July 2019 (1298 eyes of 1271 patients) and April 2020-July 2020 (455 eyes of 453 patients). Factors studied included preoperative lens status, associated phacodonesis or subluxation, pupil size, other eye lens status, associated retinal problems, glaucoma, and complications during surgery. Postoperative uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), corneal clarity, intraocular pressure (IOP), and disc status at postoperative day 1, 1 week, and 1-month visits were compared. Results: A significantly lower proportion of nuclear sclerosis (decreased from 83.2% in last year before lockdown to 55.2% during lockdown) and significantly higher proportions of mature, brown, or black cataract and phacomorphic, phacolytic, or Morgagnian cataract (increased from 15.5% in last year before lockdown to 43.8% during lockdown) were observed. The proportion of small-incision cataract surgery decreased significantly (from 63.2% to 57.4%), whereas the proportion of phacoemulsification increased significantly (from 35.9% to 41.5%) during lockdown as compared to last year. A significantly higher proportion of eyes with small pupils and association with retinal pathology were also observed during the lockdown. Conclusion: During the national lockdown, there was a shift from nuclear sclerosis grade toward mature, brown, black grade of cataracts. In addition, the proportion of small-incision cataract surgery decreased significantly whereas the proportion of phacoemulsification increased significantly during the lockdown. More number of cataracts with small pupils and associated retinal pathology were observed during the lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cataract Extraction , Cataract , Phacoemulsification , Cataract/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Lens Implantation, Intraocular , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
13.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 21(1): 295, 2021 11 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538057

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 crisis it was necessary to generate a specific care network and reconvert operating rooms to attend emergency and high-acuity patients undergoing complex surgery. The aim of this study is to classify postoperative complications and mortality and to assess the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic may have had on the results. METHODS: this is a non-inferiority retrospective observational study. Two different groups of surgical patients were created: Pre-pandemic COVID and Pandemic COVID. Severity of illness was rated according to the Diagnosis-related Groups (DRG) score. Comparisons were made between groups and between DRG severity score-matched samples. Non-inferiority was set at up to 10 % difference for grade III to V complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification, and up to 2 % difference in mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1649 patients in the PreCOVID group and 763 patients in the COVID group were analysed; 371 patients were matched for DRG severity score 3-4 (236 preCOVID and 135 COVID). No differences were found in relation to re-operation (22.5 % vs. 21.5 %) or late admission to critical care unit (5.1 % vs. 4.5 %). Clavien grade III to V complications occurred in 107 patients (45.3 %) in the PreCOVID group and in 56 patients (41.5 %) in the COVID group, and mortality was 12.7 % and 12.6 %, respectively. During the pandemic, 3 % of patients tested positive for Covid-19 on PCR: 12 patients undergoing elective surgery and 11 emergency surgery; there were 5 deaths, 3 of which were due to respiratory failure following Covid-19-induced pneumonia. CONCLUSIONS: Although this study has some limitations, it has shown the non-inferiority of surgical outcomes during the COVID pandemic, and indicates that resuming elective surgery is safe. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT04780594 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Causality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Acuity , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
14.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(11)2021 Oct 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534172

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: to evaluate whether a set of questions after a routine cataract surgery can predict unexpected findings and avoid an unnecessary follow-up visit. Materials and Methods: single-center, prospective, cohort study included 177 routine cataract surgery cases of two experienced surgeons between November 2019 and December 2020. Inclusion criteria included unremarkable postoperative day one follow-up examination. A set of seven questions regarding complaints with positive or negative answers was presented at the second follow-up visit (PV2)-one week (mean 8.34 ± 1.73 days) after the surgery. The outcome measures were the incidence of unexpected management changes (UMCs) at the PV2 visit (change or addition from a prescribed postoperative drop plan, extra procedures, an urgent referral to an ophthalmologist) and UMCs associations with the answers to a question set. Results: 81.4% of patients had no complaints about postoperative ocular status and answered with negative answers, 18.6% reported one or more complaint (positive answer): dissatisfaction with postoperative visual acuity (6.2%, 11 cases), eye pain (4.0%, 7 cases), increase in floaters after the surgery (4.0%, 7 cases), red eye (4.0%, 7 cases) and others. The prevalence of UMCs at PV2 was 1.7% (3 cases), of which 0.6% (1 case) was the prolonged antibiotic prescription due to conjunctivitis, 0.6% (1 case) was the addition of IOP lowering medication and 0.6% (1 case) was additional medication due to uveitis management. None of the complaints (positive answers) at PV2 were associated with the incidence of UMCs (p > 0.05). Conclusions: there were no associations of UMCs determined with positive answers to the questions. The prediction of UMCs incidence based on the positive answers was not obtained. Thus, we cannot exclude the necessity of a postoperative week one follow-up visit.


Subject(s)
Cataract Extraction , Cataract , Cohort Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
15.
J Surg Oncol ; 125(4): 564-569, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525470

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic, with high rate of asymptomatic infections and increased perioperative complications, prompted widespread adoption of screening methods. We analyzed the incidence of asymptomatic infection and perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing cancer surgery. We also studied the impact on subsequent cancer treatment in those with COVID-19. METHODS: All patients who underwent elective and emergency cancer surgery from April to September 2020 were included. After screening for symptoms, a preoperative test was performed from nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs before the procedure. Patients were followed up for 30 days postoperatively and complications were noted. RESULTS: 2108 asymptomatic patients were tested, of which 200 (9.5%) tested positive. Of those who tested positive, 140 (70%) underwent the planned surgery at a median of 30 days from testing positive, and 20 (14.3%) had ≥ Grade III complications. Forty (20%) patients did not receive the intended treatment; 110 patients were retested in the Postoperative period, and 41 (37.3%) tested positive and 9(22%) patients died of COVID-related complications. CONCLUSION: Routine preoperative testing for COVID-19 helps to segregate patients with asymptomatic infection. Higher complications occur in those who develop COVID-19 in postoperative period. Prolonged delay in surgery after COVID infection may influence planned treatment.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/surgery , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Preoperative Care , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Incidence , India/epidemiology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Young Adult
16.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev ; 5(10)2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526958

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic disease has imposed an unprecedented degree of stress on healthcare systems. This study aimed to understand whether COVID-19 positivity is associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes after geriatric hip fracture surgery. METHODS: From a national administrative claims data set, patients who underwent hip fracture surgery from April 1, 2020, to December 1, 2020 were selected for analysis. COVID-19-positive status was assessed by the emergency International Classification of Diagnoses, 10th Revision, COVID-19 code within 2 weeks before the surgery. Demographic, comorbidity, and 30-day postoperative adverse event information were extracted. Logistic regression before and after 10:1 propensity matching was performed to identify patient risk factors associated with the occurrence of postoperative adverse events. RESULTS: Of 42,002 patients who underwent hip fracture surgery, 678 (1.61%) were identified to be positive for COVID-19 infection. No significant differences in age, sex, and procedure type were found between COVID-19-positive and COVID-19-negative groups, but the COVID-19-positive patients demonstrated a higher incidence of several comorbidities. These differences were no longer significant after matching. After matching, the COVID-19-positive group had a higher incidence of any, serious, and minor adverse events (P < 0.001 for all). Controlling for preoperative variables, COVID-19 positivity was associated with an increased risk of experiencing any adverse events (odds ratio [OR] = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = [1.37 to 1.92], P < 0.001), serious adverse events (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = [1.31 to 2.07], P < 0.001), and minor adverse events (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = [1.34 to 1.89], P < 0.001). DISCUSSION: After matching and controlling for confounding variables, COVID-19-positive hip fracture patients had increased odds of multiple postoperative events. Clinicians caring for this vulnerable geriatric population should be mindful of this risk to improve the care for these patients during the ongoing global pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hip Fractures , Aged , Hip Fractures/epidemiology , Humans , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Heart Lung Transplant ; 41(3): 327-333, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520991

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reports focused on adult heart transplant (HTx) recipients with COVID-19 suggest an increased risk of severe disease, however; it is unclear if this holds true for pediatric HTx patients, given the typically milder course of illness in children in general with COVID-19. We sought to rapidly implement a system for multi-center data collection on pediatric HTx candidates and recipients, with the aim of describing the patient population and infection related outcomes. METHODS: The Pediatric Heart Transplant Society (PHTS) is a multi-center collaboration that seeks to improve the outcomes of children who are listed and undergo HTx. The society consists of pediatric HTx centers in North America (n = 53), UK (n = 2), and Brazil (n = 1). In response to the pandemic, PHTS developed a web-based platform to collect COVID-19 specific data on pediatric HTx candidates and recipients. Non-PHTS centers were also invited to submit data. Data fields included pre-and post-HTx patient characteristics, presumed versus documented infection, need for hospitalization (including ICU and ventilator use), treatments administered, and 30-day outcome (resolution, death, sequelae, and or unresolved) RESULTS: Data collection was initiated on 4/30/20. As of 03/15/21 there were 225 patients [19 pre-HTx and 206 post-HTx, median age 14 years (IQR 7, 18)] reported from 41 centers. Hospitalization occurred in 42% (n = 8) of the pre-HTx and 21% (n=43) of the post-HTx patients. Among the patients listed for HTx, 21% (n = 4) required ICU and 10.5% (n = 2) were mechanically ventilated. Among post-HTx patients, 7% (n = 14) required ICU and 1% (n = 3) were mechanically ventilated. At 30 days, the majority of patients had resolution of symptoms (94.7% pre-HTx, 95.6% post-HTx). One death was reported in a post-HTx patient prior to 30 days from onset of COVID-19 illness. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate the ability to rapidly adapt the PHTS data collection infrastructure in response to a novel infection and represent the first known multi-center report of characteristics and early outcomes for patients listed and following pediatric HTx with COVID-19. Hospitalization appears to be more common for both candidates and recipients due to COVID-19 than for the general pediatric population though stays were short and mortality minimal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Transplantation , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/virology , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male
18.
Rev. latinoam. enferm. (Online) ; 29: e3496, 2021. graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1511860

ABSTRACT

Objective: to analyze the evidence available in the literature about postoperative complications in adult patients undergoing surgical procedures with confirmed infection by SARS-CoV-2. Method: an integrative literature review conducted in the CINAHL, EMBASE, LILACS, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases, as well as in the gray literature. The references identified were exported to the EndNote manager and, subsequently, to the Rayyan web application for study selection. The stages of sampling, categorization of studies, evaluation of the studies included, interpretation of the results and knowledge synthesis were performed by two reviewers independently and in a masked manner. The data were analyzed descriptively. Results: of the 247 articles identified, 15 were selected to comprise this review. The prevalent postoperative complications in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 were the following: cough, dyspnea and hypoxia, need for invasive mechanical ventilation or not, admission to the intensive care unit and death. Conclusion: the most reported postoperative complications in the studies evaluated were respiratory-related, followed by cardiovascular complications. The importance of preoperative screening for COVID-19 is highlighted, as well as of the monitoring and tracking of confirmed cases in the postoperative period, as these actions exert an impact on reducing the occurrence of complications related to SARS-CoV-2.


Objetivo: analizar la evidencia disponible en la literatura sobre las complicaciones postoperatorias en pacientes adultos sometidos a procedimientos quirúrgicos con infección confirmada por SARS-CoV-2. Método: revisión integradora de la literatura realizada en las bases de datos CINAHL, EMBASE, LILACS, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science y literatura gris. Las referencias identificadas se exportaron al administrador EndNote y luego a la aplicación web Rayyan para la selección de estudios. Las etapas de muestreo, categorización de los estudios, evaluación de los estudios incluidos, interpretación de los resultados y síntesis del conocimiento fueron realizadas por dos revisores de forma independiente y enmascarada. Los datos se analizaron de forma descriptiva. Resultados: de los 247 artículos identificados, se seleccionaron 15 para componer esta revisión. Las complicaciones postoperatorias prevalentes en pacientes infectados por SARS-CoV-2 fueron: tos, disnea e hipoxia, necesidad de ventilación mecánica invasiva o no, ingreso en la unidad de terapia intensiva y muerte. Conclusión: las complicaciones postoperatorias más reportadas en los estudios evaluados fueron las respiratorias seguidas de las cardiovasculares. Se destaca la importancia del cribado preoperatorio de COVID-19, así como también del monitoreo y seguimiento de los casos confirmados en el postoperatorio, ya que son acciones que reducen la aparición de complicaciones relacionadas con el SARS-CoV-2.


Objetivo: analisar as evidências disponíveis na literatura sobre as complicações pós-operatórias em pacientes adultos submetidos a procedimentos cirúrgicos com infecção confirmada por SARS-CoV-2. Método: revisão integrativa da literatura realizada nas bases de dados CINAHL, EMBASE, LILACS, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science e na literatura cinzenta. As referências identificadas foram exportadas para o gerenciador EndNote e, em seguida, para o aplicativo web Rayyan para a seleção dos estudos. As etapas de amostragem, categorização dos estudos, avaliação dos estudos incluídos, interpretação dos resultados e síntese do conhecimento foram realizadas por dois revisores de forma independente e mascarada. Os dados foram analisados de forma descritiva. Resultados: dos 247 artigos identificados, 15 foram selecionados para compor a presente revisão. As complicações pós-operatórias prevalentes em pacientes infectados com SARS-CoV-2 foram: tosse, dispneia e hipóxia, necessidade de ventilação mecânica invasiva ou não, internação em unidade de terapia intensiva e óbito. Conclusão: destacaram-se, como complicações pós-operatórias mais relatadas nos estudos avaliados, as respiratórias seguidas das cardiovasculares. Ressalta-se a importância da triagem pré-operatória para COVID-19, bem como de acompanhamento e rastreamento de casos confirmados no pós-operatório, por serem ações que impactam na redução da ocorrência de complicações relacionadas ao SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Humans , Adult , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Respiration, Artificial , Perioperative Nursing , Coronavirus Infections , SARS-CoV-2
19.
BJS Open ; 5(6)2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510889

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a global impact on cancer care but the extent to which this has affected the management of colorectal cancer (CRC) in different countries is unknown. CRC management in Denmark was thought to have been relatively less impacted than in other nations during the first wave of the pandemic. The aim of this study was to determine the pandemic's impact on CRC in Denmark. METHODS: The Danish national cancer registry identified patients with newly diagnosed with CRC from 1 March 2020 to 1 August 2020 (pandemic interval) and corresponding dates in 2019 (prepandemic interval). Data regarding clinicopathological demographics and perioperative outcomes were retrieved and compared between the two cohorts. RESULTS: Total CRC diagnoses (201 versus 359 per month, P = 0.008) and screening diagnoses (38 versus 80 per month, P = 0.016) were both lower in the pandemic interval. The proportions of patients presenting acutely and the stage at presentation were, however, unaffected. For those patients having surgery, both colonic and rectal cancer operations fell to about half the prepandemic levels: colon (187 (i.q.r. 183-188) to 96 (i.q.r. 94-112) per month, P = 0.032) and rectal cancers (63 (i.q.r. 59-75) to 32 (i.q.r. 28-42) per month, P = 0.008). No difference was seen in surgical practice or postoperative 30-day mortality rate (colon 2.2 versus 2.2 per cent, P = 0.983; rectal 1.0 versus 2.9 per cent, P = 0.118) between the cohorts. Treatment during the pandemic interval was not independently associated with death at 30 or 90 days. CONCLUSION: The initial wave of the COVID-19 pandemic reduced the number of new diagnoses made and number of operations but had limited impact on technique or outcomes of CRC care in Denmark.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Colectomy/statistics & numerical data , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Registries
20.
Am Surg ; 88(3): 489-497, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506800

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 has caused significant surgical delays as institutions minimize patient exposure to hospital settings and utilization of health care resources. We aimed to assess changes in surgical case mix and outcomes due to restructuring during the pandemic. METHODS: Patients undergoing surgery at a single tertiary care institution in the Deep South were identified using institutional ACS-NSQIP data. Primary outcome was case mix. Secondary outcomes were post-operative complications. Chi-square, ANOVA, logistic regression, and linear regression were used to compare the control (pre-COVID, Mar 2018-Mar 2020) and case (during COVID, Mar 2020-Mar 2021) groups. RESULTS: Overall, there were 6912 patients (control: 4,800 and case: 2112). Patients were 70% white, 29% black, 60% female, and 39% privately insured. Mean BMI was 30.2 (SD = 7.7) with mean age of 58.3 years (SD = 14.8). Most surgeries were with general surgery (48%), inpatient (68%), and elective (83%). On multivariable logistic regression, patients undergoing surgery during the pandemic were more likely to be male (OR: 1.14) and in SIRS (OR: 2.07) or sepsis (OR: 2.28) at the time of surgery. Patients were less likely to have dyspnea with moderate exertion (OR: .75) and were less dependent on others (partially dependent OR: .49 and totally dependent OR: .15). Surgeries were more likely to be outpatient (OR: 1.15) and with neurosurgery (OR: 1.19). On bivariate analysis, there were no differences in post-operative outcomes. CONCLUSION: Surgeries during the COVID-19 pandemic were more often outpatient without differences in post-operative outcomes. Additional analysis is needed to determine the impact of duration of operative delay on surgical outcomes with restructuring focusing more on outpatient surgeries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diagnosis-Related Groups , Pandemics , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alabama , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Case-Control Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Regression Analysis , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
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