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2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(24): e26332, 2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269621

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients after breast cancer surgery have a high sense of stigma due to the formation of surgical scars, loss of breast shape or other reasons, leading to anxiety, depression, and other adverse mental health problems, thus reducing their quality of life. Remote peer support intervention based on telephone, internet or email is low-cost and easy to spread, and protects patients' privacy, solves the barriers to access that many patients face when attending face-to-face programs. Therefore, remote peer support may be an effective way to reduce stigma and improve mental health in patients after breast cancer surgery during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: Eight databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CNKI, PsycNET, MEDLINE, Psychology & Behavioral Sciences Collection and Web of Science) will be used to select eligible studies that were published from inception to May, 2021. The eligible studies will be screened, extracted and then the methodological quality will be evaluated independently by 2 reviewers. Review manager software version 5.3 software and Stata version 14.0 software will be used for meta-analysis. RESULTS: The results of this study will show the effect of remote peer support on stigma, depression and anxiety in patients after breast cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic and will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. CONCLUSION: The results of this study will provide evidence for the effectiveness of remote peer support in patients after breast cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021255971.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Mastectomy/psychology , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Social Stigma , Social Support , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , Depression/etiology , Depression/therapy , Female , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Peer Group , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Postoperative Complications/psychology , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
3.
Ann Transplant ; 25: e926992, 2020 Dec 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000626

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND In solid organ transplant (SOT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can contribute to a severe clinical course and an increased risk of death. Thus, patients awaiting a SOT or HSCT face the dilemma of choosing between a life-saving treatment that presents a significant threat of COVID-19 and the risk of waitlist dropout, progression of disease, or mortality. The lack of established literature on COVID-19 complicates the issue as patients, particularly those with inadequate health literacy, may not have the resources needed to navigate these decisions. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted a standardized phone survey of patients awaiting SOT or HSCT to assess the prevalence of inadequate health literacy and attitudes toward transplant during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS Seventy-one patients completed the survey, with a response rate of 84.5%. Regardless of health literacy, most waitlisted candidates recognized that the current pandemic is a serious situation affecting their care and that COVID-19 poses a significant risk to their health. Despite the increased risks, most patients reported they would choose immediate transplantation if there was no foreseeable end to the pandemic, and especially if the medical urgency did not permit further delay. There were no differences in responses across the patient waitlist groups for heart, kidney, liver, and stem cell transplant. CONCLUSIONS These findings can help transplant centers decide how transplantation services should proceed during this pandemic and can be used to educate patients and guide discussions about informed consent for transplant during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/psychology , Organ Transplantation/psychology , Patient Preference/psychology , Waiting Lists , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Global Health , Health Care Surveys , Health Literacy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/psychology , Singapore/epidemiology
4.
Clin Transplant ; 34(12): e14119, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-852260

ABSTRACT

The clinical and social impacts of the COVID-19 epidemic on lung transplant (LTx) recipients remain poorly known. We aimed to evaluate its social, clinical, and behavioral consequences on the LTx patients followed in Strasbourg university hospital. A questionnaire was used to collect details concerning patients' lifestyles, their protection methods used to avoid COVID-19 contamination, and clinical infection-related information for March 2020. A specific score was created to quantify patients' contacts and the associated risk of infectious contagion. Data were collected from 322 patients (91.2%). A majority reported a higher application than usual of social distancing and barrier measures. 43.8% described infectious-related symptoms and 15.8% needed an anti-infective treatment. There was no difference in symptom onset according to age, native lung disease, diabetes, or obesity. Nineteen patients were tested for COVID-19, and four were diagnosed positive, all with a favorable outcome. The infection risk contact score was higher for symptomatic patients (p: 0.007), those needing extra-medical appointments (p < .001), and those receiving anti-infective treatments (p = .02). LTx patients reported a careful lifestyle and did not seem at higher risk for COVID-19. Our score showed encouraging preliminary results and could become a useful tool for the usual infection-related follow-up of the LTx patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Health Behavior , Lung Transplantation , Postoperative Complications , Social Determinants of Health , Transplant Recipients/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Contact Tracing , Epidemics , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitals, University , Humans , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Compliance/psychology , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Young Adult
5.
Transplant Proc ; 52(9): 2626-2630, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-606750

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the peculiar aspects of the transplant patient's life is that, in the post-surgery phase, the patient lives in an "isolation" condition, having to pay particular attention to the living environment and preferring a limited social life given that the immunosuppressive treatment entails immunodepression in the patient. With coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID)-19, as in a post-surgery situation, social isolation is being implemented. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study started on March 17, 2020, and ended on April 24, 2020. Consulting/phone interviews were made. The phone questionnaire, submitted to 71 patients, consisted of a set of 15 questions that investigated structure and psychological resistance. Eight patients have been monitored exclusively for the psychological aspect through a more articulate supporting path. RESULTS: In essence, from the overall analysis of the data derived from the study of the positioning of patients based on the stage of renal function, the bands related to the development of psychopathological aspects, and the use of positive personal resources, it emerges that patients in stage V kidney failure are in the first bracket as regards the development of psychopathological aspects (absence of these experiences) and in the third bracket as regards the good use of positive resources to deal with isolation. Therefore, it can be deduced that, although with data that can be expanded, a serious or medium-serious situation from an organic point of view in this socio-health emergency situation is well addressed by the transplanted patient. CONCLUSION: Transplant patients have faced the measure of social distancing adequately and in adherence to the treatment thanks to the phone assistance of all the medical-surgical and psychological team.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Organ Transplantation/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Quarantine/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Organ Transplantation/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Postoperative Complications/psychology , Postoperative Complications/virology , Postoperative Period , Psychological Distance , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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