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1.
PLoS Med ; 18(11): e1003857, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542163

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To the best of our knowledge, no study has exhaustively evaluated the association between maternal morbidities and Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) during the first wave of the pandemic in pregnant women. We investigated, in natural conceptions and assisted reproductive technique (ART) pregnancies, whether maternal morbidities were more frequent in pregnant women with COVID-19 diagnosis compared to pregnant women without COVID-19 diagnosis during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data in a national cohort of all hospitalizations for births ≥22 weeks of gestation in France from January to June 2020 using the French national hospitalization database (PMSI). Pregnant women with COVID-19 were identified if they had been recorded in the database using the ICD-10 (International Classification of Disease) code for presence of a hospitalization for COVID-19. A total of 244,645 births were included, of which 874 (0.36%) in the COVID-19 group. Maternal morbidities and adverse obstetrical outcomes among those with or without COVID-19 were analyzed with a multivariable logistic regression model adjusted on patient characteristics. Among pregnant women, older age (31.1 (±5.9) years old versus 30.5 (±5.4) years old, respectively, p < 0.001), obesity (0.7% versus 0.3%, respectively, p < 0.001), multiple pregnancy (0.7% versus 0.4%, respectively, p < 0.001), and history of hypertension (0.9% versus 0.3%, respectively, p < 0.001) were more frequent with COVID-19 diagnosis. Active smoking (0.2% versus 0.4%, respectively, p < 0.001) and primiparity (0.3% versus 0.4%, respectively, p < 0.03) were less frequent with COVID-19 diagnosis. Frequency of ART conception was not different between those with and without COVID-19 diagnosis (p = 0.28). When compared to the non-COVID-19 group, women in the COVID-19 group had a higher frequency of admission to ICU (5.9% versus 0.1%, p < 0.001), mortality (0.2% versus 0.005%, p < 0.001), preeclampsia/eclampsia (4.8% versus 2.2%, p < 0.001), gestational hypertension (2.3% versus 1.3%, p < 0.03), postpartum hemorrhage (10.0% versus 5.7%, p < 0.001), preterm birth at <37 weeks of gestation (16.7% versus 7.1%, p < 0.001), <32 weeks of gestation (2.2% versus 0.8%, p < 0.001), <28 weeks of gestation (2.4% versus 0.8%, p < 0.001), induced preterm birth (5.4% versus 1.4%, p < 0.001), spontaneous preterm birth (11.3% versus 5.7%, p < 0.001), fetal distress (33.0% versus 26.0%, p < 0.001), and cesarean section (33.0% versus 20.2%, p < 0.001). Rates of pregnancy terminations ≥22 weeks of gestation, stillbirths, gestational diabetes, placenta praevia, and placenta abruption were not significantly different between the COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 groups. The number of venous thromboembolic events was too low to perform statistical analysis. A limitation of this study relies in the possibility that asymptomatic infected women were not systematically detected. CONCLUSIONS: We observed an increased frequency of pregnant women with maternal morbidities and diagnosis of COVID-19 compared to pregnant women without COVID-19. It appears essential to be aware of this, notably in populations at known risk of developing a more severe form of infection or obstetrical morbidities and in order for obstetrical units to better inform pregnant women and provide the best care. Although causality cannot be determined from these associations, these results may be in line with recent recommendations in favor of vaccination for pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Adult , Diabetes, Gestational/epidemiology , Female , Fetal Distress/epidemiology , France/epidemiology , Humans , Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Logistic Models , Maternal Mortality , Obesity/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Pre-Eclampsia/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 226(2): 236.e1-236.e14, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347471

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Concerns have been raised regarding a potential surge of COVID-19 in pregnancy, secondary to the rising numbers of COVID-19 in the community, easing of societal restrictions, and vaccine hesitancy. Although COVID-19 vaccination is now offered to all pregnant women in the United Kingdom; limited data exist on its uptake and safety. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the uptake and safety of COVID-19 vaccination among pregnant women. STUDY DESIGN: This was a cohort study of pregnant women who gave birth at St George's University Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom, between March 1, 2020, and July 4, 2021. The primary outcome was uptake of COVID-19 vaccination and its determinants. The secondary outcomes were perinatal safety outcomes. Data were collected on COVID-19 vaccination uptake, vaccination type, gestational age at vaccination, and maternal characteristics, including age, parity, ethnicity, index of multiple deprivation score, and comorbidities. Further data were collected on perinatal outcomes, including stillbirth (fetal death at ≥24 weeks' gestation), preterm birth, fetal and congenital abnormalities, and intrapartum complications. Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes of women who received the vaccine were compared with that of a matched cohort of women with balanced propensity scores. Effect magnitudes of vaccination on perinatal outcomes were reported as mean differences or odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Factors associated with antenatal vaccination were assessed with logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Data were available for 1328 pregnant women of whom 140 received at least 1 dose of the COVID-19 vaccine before giving birth and 1188 women who did not; 85.7% of those vaccinated received their vaccine in the third trimester of pregnancy and 14.3% in the second trimester of pregnancy. Of those vaccinated, 127 (90.7%) received a messenger RNA vaccine and 13 (9.3%) a viral vector vaccine. There was evidence of reduced vaccine uptake in younger women (P=.001), women with high levels of deprivation (ie, fifth quintile of the index of multiple deprivation; P=.008), and women of Afro-Caribbean or Asian ethnicity compared with women of White ethnicity (P<.001). Women with prepregnancy diabetes mellitus had increased vaccine uptake (P=.008). In the multivariable model the fifth deprivation quintile (most deprived) (adjusted odds ratio, 0.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.10; P=.003) and Afro-Caribbean ethnicity (adjusted odds ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.85; P=.044) were significantly associated with lower antenatal vaccine uptake, whereas prepregnancy diabetes mellitus was significantly associated with higher antenatal vaccine uptake (adjusted odds ratio, 10.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.74-83.2; P=.014). In a propensity score-matched cohort, the rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes of 133 women who received at least 1 dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in pregnancy were similar to that of unvaccinated pregnant women (P>.05 for all): stillbirth (0.0% vs 0.2%), fetal abnormalities (2.2% vs 2.5%), postpartum hemorrhage (9.8% vs 9.0%), cesarean delivery (30.8% vs 34.1%), small for gestational age (12.0% vs 12.8%), maternal high-dependency unit or intensive care admission (6.0% vs 4.0%), or neonatal intensive care unit admission (5.3% vs 5.0%). Intrapartum pyrexia (3.7% vs 1.0%; P=.046) was significantly increased but the borderline statistical significance was lost after excluding women with antenatal COVID-19 infection (P=.079). Mixed-effects Cox regression showed that vaccination was not significantly associated with birth at <40 weeks' gestation (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-1.23; P=.624). CONCLUSION: Of pregnant women eligible for COVID-19 vaccination, less than one-third accepted COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy, and they experienced similar pregnancy outcomes with unvaccinated pregnant women. There was lower uptake among younger women, non-White ethnicity, and lower socioeconomic background. This study has contributed to the body of evidence that having COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy does not alter perinatal outcomes. Clear communication to improve awareness among pregnant women and healthcare professionals on vaccine safety is needed, alongside strategies to address vaccine hesitancy. These strategies include postvaccination surveillance to gather further data on pregnancy outcomes, particularly after first-trimester vaccination, and long-term infant follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , /therapeutic use , Adult , Age Factors , Caribbean Region , Case-Control Studies , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Congenital Abnormalities/epidemiology , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Humans , Infant, Small for Gestational Age , Intensive Care Units , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Logistic Models , Obstetric Labor Complications/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Propensity Score , Proportional Hazards Models , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Determinants of Health , Stillbirth/epidemiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 150(1): 53-57, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196386

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study vaginal delivery outcomes and neonatal prognosis and summarize the management of vaginal delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of medical records and comparison of vaginal delivery outcomes between 10 pregnant women with clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 and 53 pregnant women without COVID-19 admitted to Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University between January 20 and March 2, 2020. Results of laboratory tests, imaging tests, and SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid tests were also analyzed in neonates delivered by pregnant women with clinical diagnosis of COVID-19. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in gestational age, postpartum hemorrhage, and perineal resection rates between the two groups. There were no significant differences in birth weight of neonates and neonatal asphyxia rates between the two groups. Neonates delivered by pregnant women with clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 infection. CONCLUSIONS: Under the premise of full evaluation of vaginal delivery conditions and strict protection measures, pregnant women with ordinary type COVID-19 can try vaginal delivery without exacerbation of COVID-19 and without increasing the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in neonates.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Adult , Birth Weight , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/virology , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vagina/virology
4.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(3)2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167648

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: COVID-19, a disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, is a public health emergency. Data on the effect of the virus on pregnancy are limited. Materials and Methods: We carried out a retrospective descriptive study, in order to evaluate the obstetric results on pregnant women in which SARS-CoV-2 was detected through RT-PCR of the nasopharyngeal swab, at admission to the maternity hospital. Results: From 16 March to 31 July 2020, 12 SARS-CoV-2 positive pregnant women have been hospitalized. Eleven were hospitalized for initiation or induction of labor, corresponding to 0.64% of deliveries in the maternity hospital. One pregnant woman was hospitalized for threatened abortion, culminating in a stillbirth at 20 weeks of gestation. Regarding the severity of the disease, nine women were asymptomatic and three had mild illness (two had associated cough and one headache). Three had relevant environmental exposure and a history of contact with infected persons. None had severe or critical illness due to SARS-CoV-2. There were no maternal deaths. The following gestational complications were observed: one stillbirth, one preterm labor, one preterm prelabor rupture of membranes, and one fetal growth restriction. Four deliveries were eutocic, two vacuum-assisted deliveries and five were cesarean sections. The indications for cesarean section were obstetric. Conclusions: SARS-CoV-2 infection was found in a minority of hospitalized pregnant women in this sample. Most are asymptomatic or have mild illness, from gestational complications to highlight stillbirth and preterm birth. There were no cases of vertical transmission by coronavirus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cesarean Section , Cough/physiopathology , Female , Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology , Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture/epidemiology , Headache/physiopathology , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Maternity , Humans , Labor, Induced , Obstetric Labor, Premature/epidemiology , Portugal/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Stillbirth/epidemiology , Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical
5.
Am J Perinatol ; 37(14): 1411-1416, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811504

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to compare the quantitative blood loss (QBL) and hemorrhage-related outcomes of pregnant women with and without a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) diagnosis. STUDY DESIGN: This retrospective cohort study of all live deliveries at Boston Medical Center between April 1, 2020 and July 22, 2020 compares the outcomes of pregnant women with a laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 positive diagnosis and pregnant women without COVID-19. The primary outcomes are QBL and obstetric hemorrhage. The secondary outcomes analyzed were a maternal composite outcome that consisted of obstetric hemorrhage, telemetry-level (intermediate care unit) or intensive care unit, transfusion, length of stay greater than 5 days, or intraamniotic infection, and individual components of the maternal composite outcome. Groups were compared using Student's t-test, Chi-squared tests, or Fisher's exact. Logistic regression was used to adjust for confounding variables. RESULTS: Of 813 women who delivered a live infant between April 1 and July 22, 2020, 53 women were diagnosed with COVID-19 on admission to the hospital. Women with a COVID-19 diagnosis at their time of delivery were significantly more likely to identify as a race other than white (p = 0.01), to deliver preterm (p = 0.05), to be diagnosed with preeclampsia with severe features (p < 0.01), and to require general anesthesia (p < 0.01). Women diagnosed with COVID-19 did not have a significantly higher QBL (p = 0.64). COVID-19 positive pregnant patients had no increased adjusted odds of obstetric hemorrhage (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.17-1.04) and no increased adjusted odds of the maternal morbidity composite (aOR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.50-1.93) when compared with those without a diagnosis of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Pregnant women with COVID-19 diagnosis do not have increased risk for obstetric hemorrhage, increased QBL or risk of maternal morbidity compared with pregnant women without a COVID-19 diagnosis. Further research is needed to describe the impact of a COVID-19 diagnosis on maternal hematologic physiology and pregnancy outcomes. KEY POINTS: · Information about blood loss associated with peripartum COVID-19 is limited.. · COVID-19 diagnosis is not associated with increase in obstetric hemorrhage.. · COVID-19 diagnosis is not associated with increase in blood loss..


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Prenatal Care/methods , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
6.
Syst Rev ; 9(1): 161, 2020 07 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-656809

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Over 4.2 million confirmed cases and more than 285,000 deaths, COVID-19 pandemic continues to harm significant number of people worldwide. Several studies have reported the impact of COVID-19 in general population; however, there is scarcity of information related to pharmacological management and maternal and perinatal outcomes during the pandemic. Altered physiological, anatomical, and immunological response during pregnancy makes it more susceptible to infections. Furthermore, during pregnancy, a woman undergoes multiple interactions with the health care system that increases her chance of getting infected; therefore, managing pregnant population presents a unique challenge. RESEARCH QUESTIONS: This systematic review seeks to answer the following questions in relation to COVID-19: What are the different clinical characteristics presented in maternal and perinatal population? What are the different maternal and perinatal outcome measures reported? What are the distinct therapeutic interventions reported to treat COVID-19? Is it safe to use "medications" used in the treatment of COVID-19 during antenatal, perinatal, postnatal, and breastfeeding? METHOD: The search will follow a comprehensive, sequential three step search strategy. Several databases relevant to COVID-19 and its impact on pregnancy including Medline, CINAHL, and LitCovid will be searched from the inception of the disease until the completion of data collection. The quality of this search strategy will be assessed using Peer Review of Electronic Search Strategies Evidence-Based Checklist (PRESS EBC). An eligibility form will be developed for a transparent screening and inclusion/exclusion of studies. All studies will be sent to RefWorks, and abstraction will be independently performed by two researchers. Risk of bias will be assessed using Cochrane Risk of Bias tool for randomized controlled trials, Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for non-randomized studies, and for case reports, Murad et al. tool will be used. Decision to conduct meta-analysis will be based on several factors including homogeneity and outcome measures reported; otherwise, a narrative synthesis will be deemed appropriate. DISCUSSION: This systematic review will summarize the existing data on effect of COVID-19 on maternal and perinatal population. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic review addressing therapeutic management and safety of medicines to treat COVID-19 during pregnancy and breastfeeding. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: This systematic review has been registered and published with Prospero ( CRD42020172773 ).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Maternal Mortality , Perinatal Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Apgar Score , Betacoronavirus , Breast Feeding , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Pre-Eclampsia/epidemiology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
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