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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1015316, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099276

ABSTRACT

Background: In March 2022, Shanghai, China, was hit by a severe wave of SARS-CoV-2 transmission caused by the Omicron variant strain. The medical staff was greatly infected during this period, which posed a traumatic event for them. Meanwhile, they also experience post-traumatic growth under introspection and positive change. However, the psychological coping and growth after infection with COVID-19 among medical staff have rarely been investigated. Objectives: To explore the process and influencing factors of post-traumatic growth among emergency nurses infected with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) so as to provide a new perspective and theoretical basis for psychological rehabilitation or intervention for medical staff who experienced traumatic events. Methods: The study used a qualitative design based on the phenomenological approach. A purposive sampling method was used to explore the subjective feelings and post-traumatic growth among 13 first-line emergency nurses infected with COVID-19 in Shanghai, China. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted in June 2022. A Seven-step Colaizzi process was used for data analysis. Results: Themes were described and extracted from the experience and insights at different stages during the fight against the virus. Three main themes, i.e., stress period, adjustment period, and growth period, as well as several sub-themes, were identified. Conclusion: First-line emergency nurses infected with COVID-19 are a sensitive group that should be given more attention. Investigating how they achieve psychological adjustment and growth in the case of severe trauma can provide valuable references for nursing management and education in the future. Society, hospital and nursing managers should pay more attention to the PTG of nurses and establish supportive PTG strategies, which will benefit the retention rate and career development of nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , China/epidemiology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082007

ABSTRACT

This study explored post-traumatic growth among preschool teachers during COVID-19 and investigated associations among post-traumatic growth, perceived crisis management, and risk perception. The participants were 2921 Chinese preschool teachers (96.5% women). Teachers' reports of post-traumatic growth, perceived crisis management, and risk perception were analyzed by multivariate techniques. The results revealed that preschool teachers' post-traumatic growth was at an intermediate level, and there was no significant difference in post-traumatic growth by risk level area. Post-traumatic growth was significantly related to risk perception and perceived crisis management, and risk perception appeared to moderate the relationship between perceived crisis management and post-traumatic growth. Our findings highlight the importance of considering the roles of perceived crisis management and risk perception in preschool teachers' post-traumatic growth. Related suggestions for preschool teachers' mental health are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Child, Preschool , Humans , Female , Male , School Teachers/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Perception , China/epidemiology
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066018

ABSTRACT

The main objective of our study was to determine whether the experience of the types of pandemic threats included in the study, could activate development responses among adolescents and what the role of the level of stress experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic is in the process of post-traumatic PTG growth. We also made an attempt to investigate whether personality traits and gender were predictors of PTG growth in adolescents. Therefore, the theoretical bases for the interpretation of the obtained results are models of post-traumatic growth (PTG), mainly by Calhoun and Tedeschi. The research was conducted in March 2020. The study subjects were 405 adolescents aged 14 to 20 years, with an average age of 17 years, of whom 59% were females and 41% were males. The following methods were used in the study: IPIP-BFM-20 to estimate five personality traits, PSS- to diagnose perceived stress, and an in-house questionnaire of pandemic threats experienced by adolescents (KZP). The results showed that the various types of 'pandemic' threats (threats to life, family, and lifestyle) are positive predictors of growth-related changes; additionally, such factors as personality traits (here: extroversion), stress level, and gender had a positive mediating effect on growth-related changes. It was also possible to show that out of the four dimensions of post-traumatic growth, three could be activated under pandemic conditions. These were: changes in relationships with others, greater appreciation of everyday life, and spiritual changes. Changes in self-perception-one of the dimensions of post-traumatic growth, were not activated due to experiencing three types of pandemic threats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987776

ABSTRACT

The literature on behavioral outcomes associated with the COVID-19 pandemic is inundated with mental health burdens such as depression and stress disorders. The current study investigated gender invariance on resilience and post-traumatic growth (PTG) as positive psychological changes associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 381 survivors of the COVID-19 infection completed measurements of resilience, PTG, violence and stigma experience, and mental health problems like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation, multivariate regression, and a latent profile analysis. The results revealed that more than half of the participants had high scores on resilience (53.6%) and PTG (60.9%). The positive psychological changes, although independent of each other, were moderated by gender, and influenced by the negative experiences of participants such as stigma, violence, and PTSD. Latent profile analyses revealed three classes of participants, two of which were characterized by high scores on mental health problems and PTG. The clusters were invariant across gender. Surviving COVID-19 contributed to resilience and PTG. These can be targeted for intervention programs to mitigate the mental health burden occasioned by the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Resilience, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Survivors/psychology
5.
Contrast Media Mol Imaging ; 2022: 9165764, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1978595

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the correlation between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the incidence of anxiety, depression, and mental disorders in patients with novel coronavirus pneumonia. Methods: Novel coronavirus pneumonia patients in Wuhan from 2020 to April were selected for treatment from hospitals and isolation wards from 1 to April. 70 rehabilitated patients were randomly divided into the control group (35 patients) and the observation group (35 patients) who were treated with conventional therapy. Positive therapy and full perfusion therapy were introduced on the basis of conventional therapy, and the related performances of different patients were observed and evaluated. Results: The anxiety, depression, and incidence rate of related psychotic patients in the observation group after treatment were significantly reduced. Patients could maintain a good mood, increase their confidence in conquering diseases, and promote their early recovery. Conclusion: Active treatment of novel coronavirus pneumonia has positive effects on posttraumatic growth of new crown pneumonia patients, relieving anxiety and negative emotions, improving emotional control, eliminating bad emotions, actively guiding patients, and promoting psychological rehabilitation of patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Technology
6.
Epilepsy Behav ; 134: 108862, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1967233

ABSTRACT

Childhood-onset epilepsy alters the everyday life of parents who have children or adolescents with epilepsy (CAWE). The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of Greek parents with CAWE, including perceived positive outcomes in their lives, where research in this area is limited. Fifteen parents took part in semi-structured interviews which were conducted online due to the social distancing measures imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Main results showed that parents with CAWE experience stress, somatic symptoms, mood swings, fear along with feelings of anger, and a sense of injustice. Positive outcomes were identified at a personal level, in parenting skills, and in achieving family cohesion. Parents reported that they had achieved increased personal strength, new perspectives, better life appreciation, and changes in their spiritual beliefs. Moreover, they mentioned the acquisition of new parenting skills which helped them become better caregivers as well as feeling more united with other family members. The changes that parents identified are discussed in relation to aspects of the Post-Traumatic Growth construct, and future recommendations and implications for practice are proposed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Parents , Qualitative Research
7.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2095133, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956532

ABSTRACT

Background: Clinical and scientific evidence has shown that a range of long-lasting symptoms can persist in the post-virological period. However, little is known about the psychological sequelae of patients hospitalized for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Objective: This study aims to assess the prevalence of anxiety-depressive symptoms, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and post-traumatic growth among patients hospitalized for COVID-19 during the first wave of the pandemic 6 months after discharge, and to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with psychological outcomes. Method: This cross-sectional cohort study enrolled recovered COVID-19 patients during a multidisciplinary follow-up screening. At 6 months post-discharge, participants underwent a remote assessment with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview Plus and completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, PTSD Checklist for DSM-5, and Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted. Results: The sample was composed of 100 patients, mainly males (72%), with a mean ± SD age of 58.7 ± 11.8 years. Regarding psychological symptoms, 34% and 24% of patients, respectively, reported anxiety and depression over the clinical threshold, and 20% met the criteria for a possible PTSD diagnosis. Psychological symptoms were associated with the presence of a mood disorder in the patient's clinical history and having received a psychological consultation after discharge. Post-traumatic growth was associated with younger age and having received a psychological consultation after discharge. Conclusions: A high prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms, potentially indicative for a mood or anxiety disorder, and PTSD was confirmed among COVID-19 survivors after 6 months. Anxiety and depressive symptoms and PTSD were associated with a previous diagnosis of a mood disorder and having received psychological consultation. Post-traumatic growth was associated with younger age and having received psychological consultation. Tailored psychological interventions could help to elaborate the psychological suffering and foster post-traumatic growth after a traumatic experience such as COVID-19 hospitalization. HIGHLIGHTS: A high prevalence of psychological symptoms has been observed among COVID-19 survivors 6 months after hospitalization.Tailored psychological interventions could help to contain the psychological sequelae and facilitate post-traumatic growth.


Antecedentes: La evidencia clínica y científica reciente ha demostrado que una variedad de síntomas duraderos pueden persistir incluso en el periodo post-virológico. Sin embargo, poco se sabe sobre las secuelas psicológicas de los pacientes hospitalizados por COVID-19.Objetivo: Este estudio tiene como objetivo evaluar la prevalencia de síntomas ansioso-depresivos, Trastorno de Estrés Postraumático (TEPT) y crecimiento postraumático entre pacientes hospitalizados por COVID-19 durante la primera ola de pandemia seis meses después del alta e identificar los factores socio-demográficos y clínicos asociados con los resultados psicológicos.Método: Este estudio de cohorte transversal inscribió a pacientes recuperados de COVID-19 durante un tamizaje de seguimiento multidisciplinario. A los seis meses del alta, los participantes se sometieron a una evaluación remota con la Entrevista Neuropsiquiátrica Internacional Mini Plus y completaron la Escala de Depresión y Ansiedad Hospitalaria, la Lista de chequeo-5 para Trastorno de Estrés Postraumático y el Inventario de Crecimiento Postraumático. Se condujeron análisis de regresión y descriptivos.Resultados: La muestra se compuso de 100 pacientes, principalmente varones (72%), con una edad promedio de 58.7 años (DE=11.8). En cuanto a los síntomas psicológicos, 34% y 24% de los pacientes reportaron ansiedad y depresión por encima del umbral clínico y 20% reunía los criterios para un posible diagnóstico de TEPT. Los síntomas psicológicos se asociaron con la presencia de un trastorno del ánimo en la historia clínica del paciente y el haber recibido una consulta psicológica tras el alta. El crecimiento postraumático se asoció con ser más joven y haber recibido una consulta psicológica tras el alta.`Conclusiones: Se confirmó una alta prevalencia de síntomas ansiosos y depresivos, potencialmente indicativo de un trastorno del estado de ánimo y TEPT entre los sobrevivientes al COVID-19 después de seis meses. Los síntomas ansiosos y depresivos y el TEPT se asociaron con un diagnóstico previo de un trastorno del ánimo y haber recibido consulta psicológica. Se encontró que el crecimiento postraumático se asociaba con ser más joven y haber recibido consulta psicológica. Las intervenciones psicológicas "a la medida" podrían ayudar a elaborar el sufrimiento psicológico y fomentar el crecimiento postraumático tras una experiencia traumática como la hospitalización por COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Aftercare , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge
8.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 73: 103274, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1945120

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 infection can profoundly affect patients' lives. Coping with difficult life crises can also lead to increased stress or positive psychological change called post-traumatic growth. This research was conducted to examine the symptoms of stress and post-traumatic growth symptoms in the patients diagnosed with COVID-19 (Coronavirus). METHOD: The present study, which is in a descriptive design, was conducted with 175 patients who were discharged after being treated in the intensive care units with the diagnosis of COVID-19. The personal information form, the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PTDS), and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) were used to collect data. RESULTS: The mean score for Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms of the participants was 19.18 ± 9.53, and the mean score for Posttraumatic Growth Inventory was 0.86 ± 0.47. In addition, a significant positive correlation was found between PTDS and PTGI mean scores (p < 0.001). As the degree of being affected by covid 19 increases, posttraumatic growth and traumatic stress symptom levels increase (p < 0.05). The posttraumatic growth levels increase as the time elapsed after the treatment of COVID-19 increases (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: It was determined that after the traumatic experience (COVID-19), the participants had moderate traumatic stress symptoms, and they overcame this situation by experiencing growth. It is recommended to take preventive measures against the symptoms of stress and support the patients in terms of overcoming this process by getting stronger.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications
9.
J Hosp Med ; 17(9): 769-771, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1925943
10.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2087979, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1915468

ABSTRACT

Background: Parents of children with intellectual and developmental disorders often experience potentially traumatic events while caring for their children. Heightened posttraumatic stress (PTS) and posttraumatic growth (PTG) have been found in this population. Objective: We aimed to explore risk and protective factors for their PTS and PTG. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 385 parents (average age M = 43.14 years, SD = 7.40; 95.3% mothers). Results: Parenting trauma showed an adverse effect on developing PTS (beta = 0.25, p < .01) and a positive role in promoting PTG (beta = 0.16, p < .01). Social support was protective in its correlation with lower levels of PTS (beta = -0.12, p < .01) and higher levels of PTG (beta = 0.22, p < .01). Barriers to care were associated with increased PTS (beta = 0.23, p < .01), but unrelated to PTG (beta = .01, p = .855). Negative parenting showed a significant, but small, correlation with more severe PTS (beta = 0.11, p < .05), and was unrelated to PTG (beta = -0.09, p = .065). Conclusions: Our study increases the understanding of posttraumatic reactions in parents, predominantly mothers, of children with IDD and identified parenting-related trauma, social support, and barriers to mental health care as predictive factors of the reactions. More research is needed to confirm and validate the effects of the discussed factors. Although causation can not be inferred, prompt and adequate screening and therapeutic resources should be provided to those mothers who were exposed to multiple stressful caregiving events and had limited healthcare access and less support from their spouses, peers, and caregiving partners. HIGHLIGHTS: Parents of a child with Intellectual and Developmental Disorders with parenting trauma had higher posttraumatic stress (PTS) and posttraumatic growth (PTG).Social support was related to lower PTS and higher PTG.Barriers to care were related to higher PTS but unrelated to PTG.


Antecedentes: Los padres de niños con trastornos intelectuales y del desarrollo a menudo experimentan eventos potencialmente traumáticos mientras cuidan a sus hijos. En esta población se han encontrado un elevado estrés postraumático (PTS por sus siglas en ingles) y crecimiento postraumático (PTG por sus siglas en ingles).Objetivo: Nuestro objetivo fue explorar los factores protectores y de riesgo para PTS y PTG.Método: Se realizó un estudio transversal con 385 padres (con edad promedio M = 43,14 años, DS = 7,40; 95,3% madres).Resultados: El trauma parental mostró ser un efecto adverso en el desarrollo de PTS (beta = 0.25, p < 0.01) y un papel positivo en la promover el PTG (beta = 0.16, p < 0,01). El apoyo social fue protector en su correlación con niveles más bajos de PTS (beta = −0.12, p < .01) y niveles más altos de PTG (beta = 0.22, p < .01). Las barreras a la atención se asociaron con un aumento de PTS (beta = 0.23, p < 0.01), pero no se relacionaron con PTG (beta = 0.01, p = 0,855). La crianza negativa mostró una correlación significativa, pero pequeña, con PTS más severos (beta = 0.11, p < 0,05) y no estuvo relacionado con el PTG (beta = −0.09, p = 0.065).Conclusiones: Nuestro estudio aumenta la comprensión de las reacciones postraumáticas en los padres, predominantemente madres, de niños con IDD e identificó el trauma relacionado con la crianza, el apoyo social y las barreras para la atención de la salud mental como factores predictivos de estas reacciones. Se necesita más investigación para confirmar y validar los efectos de los factores discutidos. Si bien no se puede inferir causalidad, se deben proporcionar recursos terapéuticos y de detección, rápidos y adecuados, a aquellas madres que estuvieron expuestas a múltiples eventos estresantes del cuidado y tuvieron acceso limitado a la atención médica y menos apoyo de sus cónyuges, compañeros y cuidadores.


Subject(s)
Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Developmental Disabilities , Humans , Parenting , Parents/psychology , Protective Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911388

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to explore the psychological welfare, as indicated by postnatal depressive symptomatology, life satisfaction, and posttraumatic growth (growth after contending with stressful birth events), of Israeli gay fathers through surrogacy in comparison to heterosexual fathers. For that purpose, a sample of 167 Israeli fathers (M = 35.6, SD = 4.4) was recruited (68 identified as gay fathers through surrogacy and 99 as heterosexual fathers). Participants completed questionnaires assessing their postnatal depressive symptomatology, life satisfaction, and sense of posttraumatic growth after becoming fathers. Results indicated that gay fathers through surrogacy reported higher levels of life satisfaction and posttraumatic growth than heterosexual fathers. Yet, gay fathers also reported higher levels of postnatal depressive symptomatology than heterosexual fathers when life satisfaction or posttraumatic growth values were low or medium. The findings were interpreted in light of the hardships associated with cross-border surrogacy and the psychological outcomes associated with succeeding to become fathers after contending with them. The study contributes to the limited literature on postnatal depressive symptomatology and posttraumatic growth among gay fathers through surrogacy and provides clinicians and policymakers with relevant information on the psychological strengths and potential difficulties associated with cross-border surrogacy among gay fathers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Fathers/psychology , Female , Heterosexuality/psychology , Homosexuality, Male/psychology , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Male , Personal Satisfaction , Pregnancy , Surrogate Mothers/psychology
12.
Scand J Caring Sci ; 36(4): 1143-1155, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1874460

ABSTRACT

Most perinatal research relating to COVID-19 focuses on its negative impact on maternal and parental mental health. Currently, there are limited data on how to optimise positive health during the pandemic. We aimed to bridge this knowledge gap by exploring how women have adapted to becoming a new parent during the pandemic and to identify elements of resilience and growth within their narratives. Mothers of infants under the age of 4 months were recruited as part of a wider UK mixed-methods study. Semi-structured interviews with 20 mothers elicited data about how COVID-19 had influenced their transition to parent a new infant, and if and how they adapted during the pandemic, what strategies they used, and if and how these had been effective. Directed qualitative content analysis was undertaken, and pre-existing theoretical frameworks of resilience and post-traumatic growth (PTG) were used to analyse and interpret the data set. The findings show evidence of a range of resilience and PTG concepts experienced during the pandemic in this cohort. Salient resilience themes included personal (active coping, reflective functioning, and meaning-making), relational (social support, partner relationships, and family relationships), and contextual (health and social connectedness) factors. There was also evidence of PTG in terms of the potential for new work-related and leisure opportunities, and women developing wider and more meaningful connections with others. Although further research is needed, and with individuals from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, these findings emphasise the significance of social support and connectivity as vital to positive mental health. Opportunities to increase digital innovations to connect and support new parents should be maximised to buffer the negative impacts of further social distancing and crisis situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Infant , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological , Qualitative Research
13.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(6): 1940-1948, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819918

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Based on Calhoun and Tedeschi's posttraumatic growth model, this study aimed to establish a path model of posttraumatic growth among nurses who provided care for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients and to examine the associations between the relevant variables. BACKGROUND: There are increasingly many studies examining the psychological health status of nurses caring for patients on the front lines of COVID-19. However, research results showing the effects of various variables affecting nurses' posttraumatic growth through positive psychological transformation are insufficient. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was based on a sample of 229 nurses who cared for COVID-19 patients for more than 1 month in South Korea from April to May 2021. RESULTS: The fitness of the modified path model (χ2 = 1.380, p = .502, GFI = 0.99, CFI = 1.00, NFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.00 and TLI = 1.01) was higher than that of the hypothesis path model (χ2 = 124.133, p < .001, GFI = 0.85, CFI = 0.66, NFI = 0.65, RMSEA = 0.36 and TLI = 0.15). Deliberate rumination had directly influenced posttraumatic growth and posttraumatic stress disorder and social support had a direct and indirect effect on posttraumatic growth. Self-disclosure indirectly influenced posttraumatic growth through deliberate rumination but was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: In order to improve posttraumatic growth of nurses caring for COVID-19 patients, it is necessary to provide and support opportunities for self-disclosure. IMPLICATION FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The results of this study can help institutions and nurse managers comprehensively understand the factors affecting posttraumatic growth of nurses caring for COVID-19 patients in the front lines and determine basic strategies based on the importance of these factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Social Support , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications
14.
Perspect Psychiatr Care ; 58(4): 2622-2630, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807251

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to examine the relationship between the transformative power of pain and posttraumatic growth in nurses with positive Covid-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. DESIGN AND METHOD: "Sociodemographics Form," "Transformative Power of Pain Scale," and "Post-Traumatic Growth Scale" were used to collect the data of the study. FINDINGS: In the study, posttraumatic growth increased as the level of the transformative power of pain increased for nurses. Furthermore, some variables were found to have an effect on the transformative power of pain and the posttraumatic growth mean score in nurses who had positive Covid-19 PCR test. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Nurses should be provided with social and professional psychological support to improve their transformative power of pain and posttraumatic growth levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Pain , Polymerase Chain Reaction
15.
J Affect Disord ; 309: 368-374, 2022 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1804391

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: While there have been some studies examining the post-traumatic growth (PTG) responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, few have been longitudinal studies exploring the changes over time or examining the underlying psychological PTG mechanisms. This study examined whether baseline perceived emotional intelligence (EI) predicted PTG through self-esteem and emotional regulation (ER) in a five-month follow-up study conducted on Chinese adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Validated measures were completed by 2090 participants, which assessed both the perceived EI and the PTG 1 month after a nationwide lockdown in China, with 1609 of these participating in the follow-up five months later. Structural equation models (SEM) were then used to explore the paths between the variables. RESULTS: As hypothesized, the follow-up survey found that the baseline perceived EI predicted PTG, ER, and self-esteem outcomes. The SEM analyses also revealed that self-esteem and ER significantly mediated the association between EI and PTG. LIMITATIONS: Studies of three or more waves may be more suitable for longitudinal mediation analyses. Self-assessment reports may have subjective effects. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that perceived EI might improve PTG in adolescents following the COVID-19 pandemic, and self-esteem and ER program training could be helpful in promoting PTG.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Adolescent , Communicable Disease Control , Emotional Intelligence , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies
16.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2055294, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774261

ABSTRACT

Background: Pre-hospitalisation, hospitalisation and post-hospitalisation factors may significantly affect depression, anxiety and post-traumatic growth (PTG) among COVID-19 survivors. Objective: Our study investigated depression, anxiety and PTG and their correlates among COVID-19 survivors. Method: A cross-sectional telephone survey recruited 199 COVID-19 patients (Mean age = 42.7; 53.3% females) at six-month follow-up after hospital discharge in five Chinese cities (i.e. Wuhan, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Dongguan and Nanning). Their demographic information, clinical records and experiences during (e.g. severity of covid-19 symptoms, treatment and exposure to other patients' suffering) and after hospitalisation (e.g. perceived impact of covid-19, somatic symptoms after hospitalisation), and psychosocial factors (e.g. perceived discrimination, self-stigma, affiliate stigma, resilience and social support) were investigated. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD-7) scale, respectively. PTG was examined by the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) instrument. Results: The proportion of depressive symptoms <5, ≥5 and <10, ≥10 were 76.9%, 12.0% and 11.1%, respectively. The proportion of anxiety symptoms <5, ≥5 and <10, ≥10 were 77.4%, 15.1% and 7.5%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression showed that receiving mental health care services during hospitalisation, somatic symptoms after discharge, perceived affiliate stigma and perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 were significantly and positively associated with probable depression. Significant correlates of probable anxiety also included permanent residents of the city, somatic symptoms after discharge, perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 and self-stigma. Social support, self-stigma and receiving mental health care services during hospitalisation were positively associated with PTG.Conclusions: The results suggest that post-hospitalisation and psychosocial factors had relatively stronger associations with depression, anxiety and PTG than pre-hospitalisation and hospitalisation factors. Promoting social support and social inclusion may be useful strategies to improve the mental health of COVID-19 survivors. HIGHLIGHTS: • Post-hospitalisation and psychosocial factors had relatively stronger associations with depression, anxiety and PTG than pre-hospitalisation and hospitalisation factors, promoting social support and social inclusion may be useful strategies to improve mental health of COVID-19 survivors.


Antecedentes: Los factores pre-hospitalización, durante la hospitalización y post-hospitalización pueden afectar significativamente la depresión, la ansiedad y el crecimiento postraumático (CPT) en los sobrevivientes de COVID-19.Objetivo: Nuestro estudio investigó la depresión, la ansiedad y el CPT y sus correlatos en sobrevivientes de COVID-19.Método: Una encuesta telefónica transversal reclutó a 199 pacientes con COVID-19 (edad promedio = 42,7; 53,3% mujeres) a los seis meses de seguimiento después del alta hospitalaria en cinco ciudades chinas (Wuhan, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Dongguan y Nanning). Su información demográfica, registros clínicos y experiencias durante la hospitalización (e.g. gravedad de los síntomas de COVID-19, tratamiento, exposición al sufrimiento de otros pacientes) y después de la hospitalización (e.g. impacto percibido de COVID-19, síntomas somáticos después de la hospitalización) y factores psicosociales (e.g. discriminación percibida, autoestigma, estigma de afiliación, resiliencia, apoyo social) fueron investigados. Los síntomas depresivos y de ansiedad se midieron mediante el Cuestionario de Salud del Paciente (PHQ-9 en su sigla en inglés) y la escala de trastorno de ansiedad generalizada (GAD-7 en su sigla en inglés) respectivamente, el CPT se examinó mediante el instrumento Inventario de Crecimiento Postraumático (PTGI en su sigla en inglés).Resultados: La proporción de síntomas depresivos <5, ≥5 y <10, y ≥10 fue 76,9%, 12,0% y 11,1% respectivamente. La proporción de síntomas de ansiedad <5, ≥5 y <10, y ≥10 fue del 77,4%, 15,1% y 7,5% respectivamente. La regresión logística multivariante mostró que recibir servicios de atención de salud mental durante la hospitalización, los síntomas somáticos después del alta, el estigma de afiliación percibido y el impacto percibido de estar infectado con COVID-19 se asociaron significativa y positivamente con una probable depresión. Los correlatos significativos de ansiedad probable también incluyeron ser residente permanente de la ciudad, síntomas somáticos después del alta, impacto percibido de estar infectado con COVID-19 y autoestigma. El apoyo social, el autoestigma y recibir servicios de salud mental durante la hospitalización se asociaron positivamente con el CPT.Conclusiones: Los resultados sugieren que los factores psicosociales y posteriores a la hospitalización tuvieron asociaciones relativamente más fuertes con la depresión, la ansiedad y el CPT que los factores previos a la hospitalización y hospitalización. Promover el apoyo social y la inclusión social pueden ser estrategias útiles para mejorar la salud mental de los sobrevivientes de COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medically Unexplained Symptoms , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Discharge , Survivors
17.
Psychiatry Res ; 312: 114541, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773709

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all areas of life, with severe potential consequences for people's mental health. Posttraumatic growth (PTG), a positive psychological change that may develop following a traumatic event, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic has only received little attention. The current study aimed to investigate (1) the prevalence of PTG within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and (2) which psychological aspects predict COVID-19 pandemic-related PTG using a 1-year longitudinal design. A sample of 70 participants completed a survey on COVID-19, posttraumatic stress, emotional well-being, coping styles, determinates of resilience, and PTG at both T1, May 2020, and T2, May 2021. Results reveal moderate levels of PTG for about one in five participants at both T1 and T2 (21% and 23%, respectively). Moreover, PTG at T1 and T2 were moderate to strongly, positively correlated, r = 0.62. Posttraumatic stress and social support were found to positively predict PTG at T1, while positive affect and social skills were found to positively predict PTG at both T1 and T2, ßs = 0.22-.52. Implications of the current findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Students , Universities
18.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 31(3): 722-730, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764953

ABSTRACT

Mental health nurses, tasked with the constant care of clients undergoing mental health treatment, have faced unique challenges arising from the uncertain outcomes of the COVID-19 pandemic. The shared exposure of both nurses and their patients to a traumatic event such this pandemic leads to additional challenges and ways of coping. The psychological effects of this shared trauma on mental health nurses arising from the pandemic are the subject of this study. An online survey was used to examine personal levels of anxiety and concern, personal and national resilience (NR), and posttraumatic growth (PTG) among 183 mental health nurses working in mental health services in Israel. Overall, the study revealed moderate levels of concern and relatively low levels of anxiety, with significant negative correlations between personal and NR and levels of concern and anxiety. Higher levels of personal and NR were related to lower levels of concern and anxiety, and there was a significant positive correlation between assessments of personal resilience and NR. A significant positive correlation was found between personal and NR and PTG. Higher religiosity was associated with higher resilience, and higher professional seniority was related to higher PTG. Finally, results for particular demographic subgroups indicate that in Israel, special attention should be given to those mental health nurses who have immigrated to Israel, are non-Jews or have less professional experience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics
19.
Psychiatr Q ; 93(2): 599-612, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1756852

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant psychological impact on medical professionals, including medical students, many who have been caring for patients on the frontlines. Understanding how medical students perceive their stressful life experiences is important as the mental health of these future physicians directly impacts their ability to care for patients. We assessed for post-traumatic growth and resilience in the face of traumatic events among a cohort of medical students that attended a medical school located in an early epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic. Between October 29, 2020 and December 1, 2020, medical students at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City were surveyed on various stressful life events, including COVID-19. We identified specific resilience behaviors, including establishing a supportive social network, relying on a moral compass, and using cognitive flexibility, that medical students commonly used to cope with traumatic experiences. Compared with students who perceived COVID-19 as their most stressful life event, students who perceived other events, such as family issues or serious illness, as most stressful experienced less COVID-related stress (t = -2.2, p = .03), greater posttraumatic growth (t = 4.3, p < .001), and demonstrated more resilient behaviors including establishing and nurturing a supportive social network (t = 2.2, p = .03), developing brain fitness (t = 2.2, p = .03), and finding meaning and purpose in things (t = 2.9, p = .006). This suggests that stressful experiences prior to or in parallel with COVID-19 encouraged posttraumatic growth and development of resilience behaviors that were protective to COVID-19-related stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Resilience, Psychological , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Students, Medical/psychology
20.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(SI-1): 3168-3181, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726145

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: The purpose of this review was to present the ultimate toll of the COVID-19 pandemic by focusing on the communication strategies and mental health. Materials and methods: We unsystematically reviewed the studies published between 2020 and 2021 from databases such as Google Scholar, Web of Science and ScienceDirect. Firstly, "new-normal" life challenges during the pandemic were discussed along with the public risk communication strategies. Later, mental health problems, posttraumatic growth, and protective factors were reviewed. Results: Literature highlighted that individuals mainly experience COVID-19 related fear, anxiety, stress, negative emotions and sleep problems. Furthermore, the rates of clinically significant depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder suggest an increase. Specifically, COVID-19 stress syndrome, loneliness, and sleep problems were associated with mental health problems in the pandemic. However, some individuals seem to be resilient to the COVID-19 trauma and experience posttraumatic growth. Brief online intervention studies are promising for reducing the emotional toll of the COVID-19 as well as for making individuals more resilient. Conclusion: To conclude, the negative conditions of the pandemic seem to make some people, but not all, vulnerable to mental illness. In addition, framing the public warnings in an optimal emotional tone seems to be more effective to comply with the precautions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Communication , Mental Health , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders
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