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1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261384, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Historically social connection has been an important way through which humans have coped with large-scale threatening events. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, lockdowns have deprived people of major sources of social support and coping, with others representing threats. Hence, a major stressor during the pandemic has been a sense of social disconnection and loneliness. This study explores how people's experience of compassion and feeling socially safe and connected, in contrast to feeling socially disconnected, lonely and fearful of compassion, effects the impact of perceived threat of COVID-19 on post-traumatic growth and post-traumatic stress. METHODS: Adult participants from the general population (N = 4057) across 21 countries worldwide, completed self-report measures of social connection (compassion for self, from others, for others; social safeness), social disconnection (fears of compassion for self, from others, for others; loneliness), perceived threat of COVID-19, post-traumatic growth and traumatic stress. RESULTS: Perceived threat of COVID-19 predicted increased post-traumatic growth and traumatic stress. Social connection (compassion and social safeness) predicted higher post-traumatic growth and traumatic stress, whereas social disconnection (fears of compassion and loneliness) predicted increased traumatic symptoms only. Social connection heightened the impact of perceived threat of COVID-19 on post-traumatic growth, while social disconnection weakened this impact. Social disconnection magnified the impact of the perceived threat of COVID-19 on traumatic stress. These effects were consistent across all countries. CONCLUSIONS: Social connection is key to how people adapt and cope with the worldwide COVID-19 crisis and may facilitate post-traumatic growth in the context of the threat experienced during the pandemic. In contrast, social disconnection increases vulnerability to develop post-traumatic stress in this threatening context. Public health and Government organizations could implement interventions to foster compassion and feelings of social safeness and reduce experiences of social disconnection, thus promoting growth, resilience and mental wellbeing during and following the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological
3.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(1): 81-87, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550629

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced leaders to reconsider the various factors that attribute to work-life balance, a healthy work environment, and resilience among nurses. Posttraumatic growth (PTG) provides a lens through which clinicians and leaders can measure, articulate, and espouse resilient recovery through unprecedented times. This article suggests the use of PTG as a framework, measured by the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory to guide leaders as they implement job-specific resiliency interventions for professional nurses. This article also suggests 3 science-based interventions intended to increase PTG. Published data support the efficacy of these interventions: resilience retreats, resilience rounds, and "The Pause," while longitudinal impacts of PTG following these interventions remain currently unknown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Resilience, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Soc Sci Med ; 289: 114409, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428489

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: The COVID-19 pandemic has had numerous negative effects globally, contributing to mortality, social restriction, and psychological distress. To date, however, the majority of research on the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has focused on negative psychological outcomes, such as depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). OBJECTIVE: Although there is debate about the constructive vs. illusory nature of post-traumatic growth (PTG), it has been found to be prevalent in a broad range of trauma survivors, including individuals affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective of this study was to identify pre- and peri-pandemic factors associated with pandemic-related PTG in a national sample of U.S. veterans. METHODS: Data were analyzed from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study, which surveyed a nationally representative cohort of 3078 U.S. veterans. A broad range of pre-pandemic and 1-year peri-pandemic factors associated with pandemic-related PTG were evaluated. Curve estimation and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were conducted to characterize the association between pandemic-related PTSD symptoms and PTG. RESULTS: Worries about the effect of the pandemic on one's physical and mental health, PTG in response to previous traumas (i.e., new possibilities and improved interpersonal relationships), and pandemic-related avoidance symptoms were the strongest correlates of pandemic-related PTG. An inverted-U shaped relationship provided the best fit to the association between pandemic-related PTSD symptoms and endorsement of PTG, with moderate severity of PTSD symptoms optimally efficient in identifying veterans who endorsed PTG. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study suggest that psychosocial interventions that promote more deliberate and organized rumination about the pandemic and enhance PTG in response to prior traumatic events may help facilitate positive psychological changes related to the COVID-19 pandemic in U.S. military veterans. Longitudinal studies on functional correlates of PTG may help inform whether these changes are constructive vs. illusory in nature.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Veterans , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Affect Disord ; 296: 35-40, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415505

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant mental health consequences for frontline health care workers (FHCWs). However, no known study has examined the prevalence, determinants, or correlates of posttraumatic growth (PTG) in this population. METHODS: Data were analyzed from a prospective cohort of FHCWs at an urban tertiary care hospital in New York City (NYC). Assessments were conducted during the spring 2020 pandemic peak (Wave 1) and seven months later (Wave 2). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify Wave 1 sociodemographic, occupational, and psychosocial factors associated with PTG at Wave 2, and the association between aspects of PTG with burnout and pandemic-related PTSD symptoms at Wave 2. RESULTS: A total 76.8% of FHCWs endorsed moderate or greater PTG; the most prevalent domains were increased appreciation of life (67.0%), improved relationships (48.7%), and greater personal strength (44.1%). Non-White race/ethnicity, greater levels of positive emotions, pandemic-related PTSD symptoms, dispositional gratitude, and feelings of inspiration were independently associated with PTG. At Wave 2, endorsement of spiritual growth during the pandemic was associated with 52% and 44% lower odds of screening positive for pandemic-related PTSD symptoms and burnout, respectively; greater improvement in relationships was associated with 36% lower odds of screening positive for burnout. LIMITATIONS: Single institution study and use of self-report instruments. CONCLUSIONS: Nearly 4-of-5 FHCWs report pandemic-related PTG, driven largely by salutogenic factors assessed during the pandemic surge. Interventions to bolster these factors may help promote PTG and mitigate risk for burnout and pandemic-related PTSD symptoms in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
6.
Span J Psychol ; 24: e43, 2021 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402012

ABSTRACT

We explored post-traumatic growth (PTG) in older adults immediately after the forced lockdown in Spain during March to April, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The study also tried to identify the variables that predict PTG, focusing on the experience of COVID, sociodemographic variables, and social resources. In total 1,009 people aged 55 years and older participated in the study and completed an online questionnaire comprising the following elements: The short form of the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI-SF), sociodemographic and social resources questions, and their experiences of COVID-19 (if they had been infected themselves or if they had experienced the loss of someone close). Results showed that only a quarter of the participants experienced higher PTG after the forced lockdown, with only age and social resources being correlated with scores on the PTGI-SF. Looking at the strengths that older adults put into action to combat the pandemic and its social and health consequences could be an important consideration when planning future social policies for this and other pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Aged/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Marital Status , Middle Aged , Social Support , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 Sep 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403603

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic represents a traumatic event that has profoundly changed working conditions with detrimental consequences for workers' health, in particular for the healthcare population directly involved in addressing the emergency. Nevertheless, previous research has demonstrated that traumatic experiences can also lead to positive reactions, stimulating resilience and feelings of growth. The aim of this narrative review is to investigate the positive aspects associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and the possible health prevention and promotion strategies by analyzing the available scientific evidence. In particular, we focus on the constructs of resilience, coping strategies and posttraumatic growth (PTG). A literature search was performed on the PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar and Psycinfo databases. Forty-six articles were included in the literature synthesis. Psychological resilience is a fundamental variable for reducing and preventing the negative psychological effects of the pandemic and is associated with lower levels of depression, anxiety and burnout. At the individual and organizational level, resilience plays a crucial role in enhancing wellbeing in healthcare and non-healthcare workers. Connected to resilience, adaptive coping strategies are essential for managing the emergency and work-related stress. Several positive factors influencing resilience have been highlighted in the development of PTG. At the same time, high levels of resilience and positive coping strategies can enhance personal growth. Considering the possible long-term coexistence and consequences of COVID-19, organizational interventions should aim to improve workers' adaptive coping skills, resilience and PTG in order to promote wellbeing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Resilience, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace
8.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256854, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381286

ABSTRACT

Volunteers have played an important role by supporting essential services that have been overwhelmed during the most critical moments of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Hence, nonprofit organizations may be interested in preventing negative consequences of these volunteers' exposure to potentially traumatic events. The aim of this cross-sectional study was twofold. First, to examine to what extent self-compassion and self-determination would contribute to differentiating between volunteers with different levels of compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and post-traumatic growth. Second, to identify the best predictors of the most extreme levels of each outcome. Participants were 211 Spanish Red Cross volunteers (60.7% women), who completed a survey. They were separately classified into three groups (low, medium, and high) according to the 33rd and 66th percentile scores on each outcome (compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and post-traumatic growth). Univariate analyses of variance and post-hoc comparisons revealed that self-compassion and self-determination contributed differently to distinguishing between levels of each outcome. Volunteers lowest in compassion fatigue stood out for showing fewer non-compassionate strategies and more mindfulness than the other groups. Moreover, those higher in satisfaction compassion also showed lower use of unhealthy strategies and higher scores in all other predictive variables. Volunteers highest in post-traumatic growth showed higher self-kindness and satisfaction of all psychological needs. Binary logistic regressions allowed for the identification of predictors of belonging to the most extreme groups. The protective factors may be useful to guide volunteers' self-care and help them thrive in the face of critical service demands.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Volunteers/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Spain/epidemiology
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(14)2021 07 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314631

ABSTRACT

Through a statistical survey of 760 front-line medical staff during the COVID-19 epidemic, this study attempts to explore the relationships between relational capital, psychological security, post-traumatic growth and the meaning of work. Data analysis verifies that trust, reciprocity, and identification can promote post-traumatic growth by enhancing the individual's psychological security. A high level of work meaning can enhance the role of trust, reciprocity and identification in promoting psychological security. Work meaning has a moderated mediating effect when trust and reciprocity affect post-traumatic growth through psychological security, but no moderated mediating effect is found when identification affects post-traumatic growth through psychological security.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Trust
11.
Psychiatry Res ; 302: 114035, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244806

ABSTRACT

Given the prolonged nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the purpose of this study was to examine the association between posttraumatic growth (PTG) among young adults during the COVID-19 pandemic and their psychosocial characteristics, specifically: distress tolerance; resilience; family connectedness; depression, anxiety, and PTSD symptoms; and COVID-19-related worry. The study utilized data from 805 U.S. young adults (18-30 years) who completed online surveys during the COVID-19 pandemic across two waves (April-August 2020 and September 2020-March 2021). Overall, young adults reported low PTG scores. PTSD symptoms and COVID-19-related worry significantly predicted higher levels of PTG, while their depression symptoms predicted lower levels of PTG. Resilience and family connectedness significantly predicted higher levels of PTG, and distress tolerance significantly predicted lower levels of PTG after accounting for sociodemographic characteristics and negative influential factors. Compared to Whites, Asians were less likely to report PTG. In general, young adults have not perceived personal growth from the pandemic; however, young adults with certain psychosocial factors appear to be predisposed to such PTG. This study highlights the importance of exploring and elucidating the potential positive trajectories following the adversity of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
Clin Nurs Res ; 30(7): 1079-1087, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238686

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 infection can cause psychological distress and profoundly impact patients' lives, but it can also lead to positive changes and post-traumatic growth (PTG), or positive psychological change in response to challenging life circumstances. Current research on the influence of COVID-19 infection has mainly focused on its negative effects. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with COVID-19 in China experienced PTG and, if so, what changed for them during the process of PTG. We used a qualitative descriptive approach to conduct this study. Using the purposive sampling recruitment method, patients with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis were recruited from a COVID-19 designated hospital in Shanghai, China, from April to July 2020. Data were collected using semi-structured, in-depth interviews conducted via cell phone or in person while social distancing to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Forty confirmed COVID-19 patients (19-68 years old) were recruited. Several prominent themes and subthemes were extracted from the interview responses regarding participants' experiences of PTG. The following are among the positive changesthat occurred for these participants after their diagnosis of COVID-19: (1) Reevaluation of their life priorities, which included a greater appreciation of being alive and re-evaluating their values and goals, (2) Improved relationships within their social circles, which included establishing or maintaining closer relationships with family and friends and a greater willingness to help others, and (3) Perceived changes regarding themselves, which included personal growth and increased awareness of the importance of their health. The study identified potential positive impacts of COVID-19 on patients, which could be helpful in the implementation of interventions to facilitate PTG among COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 Testing , China , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
13.
Appl Psychol Health Well Being ; 13(4): 871-886, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218082

ABSTRACT

Research on traumatic events often emphasizes the importance of posttraumatic growth (PTG) and resilience, yet few studies have explored their trends and their relationship throughout the progression of traumatic events. This paper explores the longitudinal relationship between resilience and PTG, as well as the role of job burnout in this relationship, among frontline healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, who have been exposed to high-risk work environments over extraordinarily long workdays. In Study 1, 134 Chinese frontline healthcare workers completed a three-wave survey (Time 1, Time 2, and Time 3) in February-May 2020. In Study 2, 401 frontline healthcare workers completed a cross-sectional survey. The cross-lagged analysis suggested that resilience at Time 1 positively predicted PTG at Time 2, which in turn positively predicted resilience at Time 3. PTG at Time 1 also positively predicted resilience at Time 2 (Study 1). However, job burnout was negatively related to both resilience and PTG; in particular, emotional exhaustion moderated the link between PTG and resilience (Study 2). Our findings support a cycle of reinforcement between resilience and PTG over time. The positive effect of PTG on resilience, however, is undermined by emotional exhaustion. Implications for future intervention research and workplace support are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Resilience, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(9)2021 04 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202157

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has increased the likelihood of healthcare professionals suffering from Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS). However, the difficulty of this crisis may lead these professionals to display personal resources, such as harmonious passion, that could be involved in posttraumatic growth. The goal of this study is to examine the STS and posttraumatic growth among healthcare professionals and the demands and resources related to COVID-19. A longitudinal study was carried out in April 2020 (T1) and December 2020 (T2). The participants were 172 health professionals from different health institutions and they reported their workload, fear of contagion, lack of staff and personal protection equipment (PPE), harmonious passion, STS and posttraumatic growth. The results revealed that workload and fear of contagion in T2 were positive predictors for STS, whereas harmonious passion was a negative predictor. Fear of contagion of both times seemed to positively predict posttraumatic growth, as well as harmonious passion. One moderation effect was found concerning the lack of staff/PPE, as posttraumatic growth was higher when the workload was high, especially in those with a high lack of staff/PPE. All in all, these findings pointed out the need for preventative measures to protect these professionals from long-term negative consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 35(2): 55, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199581
16.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 18(8): 1198-1207, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185030

ABSTRACT

The acute consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic have impacted wellness strategies aimed at mitigating the pre-existing epidemic of burnout in radiology. Specifically, safety measures including social distancing requirements, effective communications, supporting remote and distributed work teams, and newly exposed employment and treatment inequities have challenged many major efforts at fostering professional fulfillment. To get our wellness efforts back on track and to achieve a new and perhaps even a better "normal" will require refocusing and reconsidering ways to foster and build a culture of wellness, implementing practices that improve work efficiencies, and supporting personal health, wellness behaviors, and resilience. Optimizing meaning in work is also critical for well-being and professional fulfillment. In addition to these earlier approaches, organizations and leaders will need to reprioritize efforts to build high-functioning cohesive and connected teams; to train, implement, and manage peer-support practices; and to support posttraumatic growth. This growth represents the positive psychological changes that can occur after highly challenging life circumstances and, when successful, allows individuals to achieve a higher level of functioning by addressing and learning from the precipitating event. Our practices can support this growth through education, emotional regulation, and disclosure, by developing a narrative that reimagines a hoped-for better future and by finding meaning through services that benefit others.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Radiologists , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Nurs Open ; 8(5): 2866-2876, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171114

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore the mediating role of post-traumatic growth and perceived professional benefits between resilience and intent to stay among Chinese nurses to support Wuhan in managing COVID-19. DESIGN: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey. METHODS: In May 2020, the study recruited a convenience sample of 200 Chinese nurses to support Wuhan in managing COVID-19. A set of self-rating questionnaires was used to measure resilience, post-traumatic growth, perceived professional benefits and intent to stay. Structural equation modelling was performed with 5,000 bootstrap samples using AMOS 23.0. RESULTS: The final model provided a good fit for the data. Resilience had the strongest direct effect on intent to stay. Perceived professional benefits partially mediated the association between resilience and intent to stay. Overall, the serial multiple mediations of post-traumatic growth and perceived professional benefits in the relationship between resilience and intent to stay was statistically significant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Psychiatriki ; 32(1): 19-25, 2021 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148405

ABSTRACT

Despite the indisputable negative psychosocial consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, positive consequences are also possible. Resilience and coping strategies have been assumed to contribute to these outcomes. However, findings are still scarce and inconclusive. The study aimed to examine the role of resilience and coping strategies in the secondary stress for the Greek healthcare workers (HCWs) and in the posttraumatic growth following the COVID-19 lockdown in Greece. A sample of 673 HCWs coming from Greece were recruited. A convenience and snowball mixed sampling procedure were used. A questionnaire was distributed through social networking sites, webpages, and personal contacts of the author. Participants were asked to distribute it to their own contacts. Recruitment occurred during April 5 - 30, 2000, amid the lockdown (March 23-May 03), when people were asked to follow the stringent lockdown constraint enforced by the Greek government. Sociodemographic data were collected. The Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale measured secondary traumatic stress (STS) for the HCWs. The Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory, the Brief Resilience Scale, and the Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Inventory measured posttraumatic growth, resilience, and coping strategies, respectively. Regression analyses demonstrated that resilience and coping strategies were differentially associated with positive and negative (stress/growth) lockdown outcomes. Resilience and mostly maladaptive coping strategies predicted STS. A mixture of adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies predicted PTG. The so-called "second wave" of the outbreak that started in August 2020 indicates that the study of the psychosocial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown and of the internal resources (resilience and coping) to deal with, is necessary. The findings contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the coping strategies used by population subgroups (e.g., HCWs) in dealing with the COVID-19 lockdown in Greece. Enhancing internal resources through supportive services will ameliorate HCWs ability to withstand, recover, and thrive with benefits in their psychological health and well-being. Despite the indisputable negative psychosocial consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, positive consequences are also possible. Resilience and coping strategies have been assumed to contribute to these outcomes. However, findings are still scarce and inconclusive. The study aimed to examine the role of resilience and coping strategies in the secondary stress for the Greek healthcare workers (HCWs) and in the posttraumatic growth following the COVID-19 lockdown in Greece. A sample of 673 HCWs coming from Greece were recruited. A convenience and snowball mixed sampling procedure were used. A questionnaire was distributed through social networking sites, webpages, and personal contacts of the author. Participants were asked to distribute it to their own contacts. Recruitment occurred during April 5 - 30, 2000, amid the lockdown (March 23-May 03), when people were asked to follow the stringent lockdown constraint enforced by the Greek government. Sociodemographic data were collected. The Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale measured secondary traumatic stress (STS) for the HCWs. The Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory, the Brief Resilience Scale, and the Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Inventory measured posttraumatic growth, resilience, and coping strategies, respectively. Regression analyses demonstrated that resilience and coping strategies were differentially associated with positive and negative (stress/growth) lockdown outcomes. Resilience and mostly maladaptive coping strategies predicted STS. A mixture of adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies predicted PTG. The so-called "second wave" of the outbreak that started in August 2020 indicates that the study of the psychosocial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown and of the internal resources (resilience and coping) to deal with, is necessary. The findings contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the coping strategies used by population subgroups (e.g., HCWs) in dealing with the COVID-19 lockdown in Greece. Enhancing internal resources through supportive services will ameliorate HCWs ability to withstand, recover, and thrive with benefits in their psychological health and well-being.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Quarantine/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Adult , Aged , Compassion Fatigue , Female , Greece , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neuropsychological Tests , Pandemics , Social Media , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
20.
Perspect Psychiatr Care ; 57(4): 1876-1887, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138221

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine the relationship between posttraumatic growth (PTG), psychological flexibility, and psychological resilience of nursing students after the COVID-19 alarm status. DESIGN AND METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with nursing students (N = 292) studying at a nursing school of a university. The data collection instruments included a form on descriptive variables, and the PTG, psychological flexibility, and psychological resilience scales. Descriptive statistics, independent-samples t test, ANOVA, correlation, simple, and hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to analyze the data. FINDINGS: The mean scores regarding psychological flexibility, psychological resilience, and PTG were 27.56 ± 11.06, 18.10 ± 5.75, and 63.49 ± 20.64, respectively. While psychological flexibility explained 36.7% of the total variance in psychological resilience, the predictive effect of seven descriptive variables, including psychological flexibility and psychological resilience, on PTG was determined as 13.4%. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: PTG, psychological flexibility, and psychological resilience may help nursing students prepare for their transition to the profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Resilience, Psychological , Students, Nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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