Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 112
Filter
Add filters

Year range
1.
Adv Respir Med ; 88(6): 640-650, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060560

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, in Wuhan, the Hubei Province's capital city in China, the first cases of COVID-19 disease caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, were described. The rapid spread of the infection through the world resulted in the World Health Organization announcing the COVID-19 a global pandemic in March 2020. The main routes of transmission of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, according to current evidence, are via droplets inhalation, direct contact with contaminated surfaces, and transmission via the mucous membranes of the mouth, nose, and eyes, and probably through airborne particles from the respiratory tract, generated during coughing and sneezing of infected individuals. During the pulmonary function testing (PFTs), which require strenuous breathing maneuvers and generate high-intensity airflow, aerosols, and micro-aerosols are formed from respiratory secretions and may contain viral and bacterial particles. Therefore, such forced respiratory maneuvers pose a significant risk of spreading the infection to patients and laboratory staff. According to current knowledge, the source of infection may also be an asymptomatic and a pre-symptomatic individual. Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has been increasingly prevalent in the community, and this increases a potential risk to all patients tested lung function and staff working there. As the patients' and staff's safety is of unprecedented importance, the additional precautions when performing pulmonary function tests are necessary and unquestionable. In consequence, the greater availability of consumables and personal protective equipment is indispensable. The reorganization of daily practice will prolong test time, reduce the number of tests performed, and slow down patients' flow. The guidance provides practical advice to health care professionals on performing pulmonary function tests during the COVID-19 pandemic. It has been developed basing on currently available information and recommendations from relevant health care institutions. As the COVID-19 pandemic is a rapidly evolving situation and the new scientific data has been becoming are available, the guidance will be updated over time.


Subject(s)
/diagnosis , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Societies, Medical/standards , Spirometry/standards , Academic Medical Centers , Humans , Poland
3.
Curr Oncol ; 27(5): e512-e515, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024676

ABSTRACT

Sarcoma treatment during the covid-19 pandemic is a new challenge. This patient population is often immunocompromised and potentially more susceptible to viral complications. Government guidelines highlight the need to minimize patient exposure to unnecessary hospital visits. However, those guidelines lack practical recommendations on ways to manage triage and diagnosis expressly for new cancer patients. Furthermore, there are no reports on the efficiency of the guidelines. One of the main issues in treating musculoskeletal tumours is the complexity and variability of presentation. We offer a triage model, used in a quaternary-referral musculoskeletal oncology centre, that allows us to maintain an open pathway for referral of new patients while minimizing exposure risks. A multidisciplinary approach and analysis of existing investigations allow for a pre-clinic evaluation. The model identifies 3 groups of patients: ■ Patients with suspected high-grade malignancy, or benign cases with aggressive features, both in need of further evaluation in the clinic and prompt treatment■ Patients with low-grade malignancy, and benign cases whose treatment is not urgent, that are managed during the pandemic by telemedicine, with reassurance and information about their illness■ Patients who can be managed by their local medical professionals In comparison to a pre-pandemic period, that approach resulted in a higher ratio of malignant-to-benign conditions for new patients seen in the clinic (3:4 vs. 1:3 respectively), thus using available resources more efficiently and prioritizing patients with suspected high-grade malignancy. We believe that this triage system could be applied in other surgical oncology fields during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Bone Neoplasms/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Soft Tissue Neoplasms/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Triage/standards , Bone Neoplasms/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Management , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Management , Soft Tissue Neoplasms/virology
4.
Curr Oncol ; 27(5): e501-e511, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024675

ABSTRACT

Objective: We aimed to review data about delaying strategies for the management of hepatobiliary cancers requiring surgery during the covid-19 pandemic. Background: Given the covid-19 pandemic, many jurisdictions, to spare resources, have limited access to operating rooms for elective surgical activity, including cancer, thus forcing deferral or cancellation of cancer surgeries. Surgery for hepatobiliary cancer is high-risk and particularly resource-intensive. Surgeons must critically appraise which patients will benefit most from surgery and which ones have other therapeutic options to delay surgery. Little guidance is currently available about potential delaying strategies for hepatobiliary cancers when surgery is not possible. Methods: An international multidisciplinary panel reviewed the available literature to summarize data relating to standard-of-care surgical management and possible mitigating strategies to be used as a bridge to surgery for colorectal liver metastases, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallbladder cancer, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Results: Outcomes of surgery during the covid-19 pandemic are reviewed. Resource requirements are summarized, including logistics and adverse effects profiles for hepatectomy and delaying strategies using systemic, percutaneous and radiation ablative, and liver embolic therapies. For each cancer type, the long-term oncologic outcomes of hepatectomy and the clinical tools that can be used to prognosticate for individual patients are detailed. Conclusions: There are a variety of delaying strategies to consider if availability of operating rooms decreases. This review summarizes available data to provide guidance about possible delaying strategies depending on patient, resource, institution, and systems factors. Multidisciplinary team discussions should be leveraged to consider patient- and tumour-specific information for each individual case.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hepatectomy/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/methods , Liver Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Surgeons/standards , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics , Patient Care Management , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
5.
Clin Cancer Res ; 26(22): 5809-5813, 2020 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004223

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has fundamentally disrupted the practice of oncology, shifting care onto virtual platforms, rearranging the logistics and economics of running a successful clinical practice and research, and in some contexts, redefining what treatments patients with cancer should and can receive. Since the start of the pandemic in early 2020, there has been considerable emphasis placed on the implications for patients with cancer in terms of their vulnerability to the virus and potential exposure in healthcare settings. But little emphasis has been placed on the significant, and potentially enduring, consequences of COVID-19 for how cancer care is delivered. In this article, we outline the importance of a focus on the effects of COVID-19 for oncology practice during and potentially after the pandemic, focusing on key shifts that are already evident, including: the pivot to online consultations, shifts in access to clinical trial and definitions of "essential care," the changing economics of practice, and the potential legacy effects of rapidly implemented changes in cancer care. COVID-19 is reshaping oncology practice, clinical trials, and delivery of cancer care broadly, and these changes might endure well beyond the short- to mid-term of the active pandemic. Therefore, shifts in practice brought about by the pandemic must be accompanied by improved training and awareness, enhanced infrastructure, and evidence-based support if they are to harness the positives and offset the potential negative consequences of the impacts of COVID-19 on cancer care.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Telemedicine/methods , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
7.
Cancer Cell ; 38(5): 605-608, 2020 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971882

ABSTRACT

Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have become hotspots of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, exacerbating socioeconomic inequalities and overwhelming fragmented health systems. Studies from the United States and Europe have highlighted the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer and the disruption it has caused on cancer care delivery. The HOLA COVID-19 Study aims to understand how cancer care in Latin American countries has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , International Cooperation , Latin America/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
8.
Cancer Cell ; 38(5): 602-604, 2020 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970849

ABSTRACT

To understand the real impact of COVID-19 on cancer patients, an entirely new data collection effort was initiated within the Thoracic Cancers International COVID-19 Collaboration (TERAVOLT). TERAVOLT reported high mortality related to COVID-19 infection in thoracic cancer patients and identified several negative prognostic factors. In this commentary, we discuss the importance and limits of patient registries to support decision-making in thoracic cancer during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Decision-Making , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Global Burden of Disease/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , International Cooperation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Registries , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/virology
9.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 20(5): e154-e159, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962927

ABSTRACT

There is disagreement between international guidelines on the level of personal protective equipment (PPE) required for chest compressions for patients with suspected COVID-19. This discrepancy centres on whether they are considered to be an aerosol-generating procedure (AGP), thus requiring airborne protection to prevent transmission to healthcare workers (HCWs). The need to don higher-level PPE has to be weighed against the resulting delay to emergency treatment.We performed a literature search on this topic which found eight relevant studies. All were observational with low patient numbers and multiple confounding factors, but describe cases of acute respiratory infection transmission during chest compressions. One systematic review concluded that chest compressions were not an AGP. Two simulated studies (released as preprints) potentially demonstrate aerosol generation. Given that there is evidence for infection transmission during chest compressions, we conclude that a precautionary approach with appropriate PPE is necessary to protect HCW from contracting a potentially fatal infection.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Aerosols/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Occupational Health , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , United Kingdom
10.
Curr Oncol ; 27(5): e501-e511, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-914578

ABSTRACT

Objective: We aimed to review data about delaying strategies for the management of hepatobiliary cancers requiring surgery during the covid-19 pandemic. Background: Given the covid-19 pandemic, many jurisdictions, to spare resources, have limited access to operating rooms for elective surgical activity, including cancer, thus forcing deferral or cancellation of cancer surgeries. Surgery for hepatobiliary cancer is high-risk and particularly resource-intensive. Surgeons must critically appraise which patients will benefit most from surgery and which ones have other therapeutic options to delay surgery. Little guidance is currently available about potential delaying strategies for hepatobiliary cancers when surgery is not possible. Methods: An international multidisciplinary panel reviewed the available literature to summarize data relating to standard-of-care surgical management and possible mitigating strategies to be used as a bridge to surgery for colorectal liver metastases, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallbladder cancer, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Results: Outcomes of surgery during the covid-19 pandemic are reviewed. Resource requirements are summarized, including logistics and adverse effects profiles for hepatectomy and delaying strategies using systemic, percutaneous and radiation ablative, and liver embolic therapies. For each cancer type, the long-term oncologic outcomes of hepatectomy and the clinical tools that can be used to prognosticate for individual patients are detailed. Conclusions: There are a variety of delaying strategies to consider if availability of operating rooms decreases. This review summarizes available data to provide guidance about possible delaying strategies depending on patient, resource, institution, and systems factors. Multidisciplinary team discussions should be leveraged to consider patient- and tumour-specific information for each individual case.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hepatectomy/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/methods , Liver Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Surgeons/standards , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics , Patient Care Management , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
11.
Curr Oncol ; 27(5): 270-274, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902689

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (covid-19) pandemic caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has necessitated changes to the way patients with chronic diseases are managed. Given that patients with multiple myeloma are at increased risk of covid-19 infection and related complications, national bodies and experts around the globe have made recommendations for risk mitigation strategies for those vulnerable patients. Understandably, because of the novelty of the virus, many of the proposed risk mitigation strategies have thus far been reactionary and cannot be supported by strong evidence. In this editorial, we highlight some of the risk mitigation strategies implemented at our institutions across Canada during the first wave of covid-19, and we discuss the considerations that should be made when managing patients during the second wave and beyond.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Multiple Myeloma/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Telemedicine/methods , Canada/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Management , Humans , Multiple Myeloma/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Management
13.
Curr Oncol ; 27(5): e512-e515, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902687

ABSTRACT

Sarcoma treatment during the covid-19 pandemic is a new challenge. This patient population is often immunocompromised and potentially more susceptible to viral complications. Government guidelines highlight the need to minimize patient exposure to unnecessary hospital visits. However, those guidelines lack practical recommendations on ways to manage triage and diagnosis expressly for new cancer patients. Furthermore, there are no reports on the efficiency of the guidelines. One of the main issues in treating musculoskeletal tumours is the complexity and variability of presentation. We offer a triage model, used in a quaternary-referral musculoskeletal oncology centre, that allows us to maintain an open pathway for referral of new patients while minimizing exposure risks. A multidisciplinary approach and analysis of existing investigations allow for a pre-clinic evaluation. The model identifies 3 groups of patients: ■ Patients with suspected high-grade malignancy, or benign cases with aggressive features, both in need of further evaluation in the clinic and prompt treatment■ Patients with low-grade malignancy, and benign cases whose treatment is not urgent, that are managed during the pandemic by telemedicine, with reassurance and information about their illness■ Patients who can be managed by their local medical professionals In comparison to a pre-pandemic period, that approach resulted in a higher ratio of malignant-to-benign conditions for new patients seen in the clinic (3:4 vs. 1:3 respectively), thus using available resources more efficiently and prioritizing patients with suspected high-grade malignancy. We believe that this triage system could be applied in other surgical oncology fields during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Bone Neoplasms/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Soft Tissue Neoplasms/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Triage/standards , Bone Neoplasms/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Management , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Management , Soft Tissue Neoplasms/virology
14.
Cancer Cell ; 38(5): 605-608, 2020 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-856522

ABSTRACT

Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have become hotspots of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, exacerbating socioeconomic inequalities and overwhelming fragmented health systems. Studies from the United States and Europe have highlighted the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer and the disruption it has caused on cancer care delivery. The HOLA COVID-19 Study aims to understand how cancer care in Latin American countries has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , International Cooperation , Latin America/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
15.
Ital J Pediatr ; 46(1): 149, 2020 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-842313

ABSTRACT

The rapid spread of the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy has dramatically impacted the National Healthcare System, causing the sudden congestion of hospitals, especially in Northern Italy, thus imposing drastic restriction of almost all routine medical care. This exceptional adaptation of the Italian National Healthcare System has also been felt by non-frontline settings such as Pediatric Orthopaedic Units, where the limitation or temporary suspension of most routine care activities met with a need to maintain continuity of care and avoid secondary issues due to the delay or suspension of the routine clinical practice. The Italian Society of Pediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology formulated general and specific recommendations to face the COVID-19 outbreak, aiming to provide essential care for children needing orthopaedic treatments during the pandemic and early post-peak period, ensure safety of children, caregivers and healthcare providers and limit the spread of contagion.


Subject(s)
Cross Infection/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Child , Child, Preschool , Clinical Decision-Making , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedics/standards , Patient Safety , Pediatrics/standards , Societies, Medical/standards , Traumatology/standards
16.
Cancer Cell ; 38(5): 602-604, 2020 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-813504

ABSTRACT

To understand the real impact of COVID-19 on cancer patients, an entirely new data collection effort was initiated within the Thoracic Cancers International COVID-19 Collaboration (TERAVOLT). TERAVOLT reported high mortality related to COVID-19 infection in thoracic cancer patients and identified several negative prognostic factors. In this commentary, we discuss the importance and limits of patient registries to support decision-making in thoracic cancer during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Decision-Making , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Global Burden of Disease/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , International Cooperation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Registries , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/virology
18.
Eur J Cancer ; 140: 86-104, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-778791

ABSTRACT

Since its first detection in China in late 2019 the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the associated infectious disease COVID-19 continue to have a major impact on global healthcare and clinical practice. Cancer patients, in particular those with haematological malignancies, seem to be at an increased risk for a severe course of infection. Deliberations to avoid or defer potentially immunosuppressive therapies in these patients need to be balanced against the overarching goal of providing optimal antineoplastic treatment. This poses a unique challenge to treating physicians. This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations regarding prevention, diagnostics and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 as well as strategies towards safe antineoplastic care during the COVID-19 pandemic. It was prepared by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society for Haematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) by critically reviewing the currently available data on SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 in cancer patients applying evidence-based medicine criteria.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Evidence-Based Practice/standards , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Management , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Societies, Medical
19.
Clin Neuropsychol ; 34(7-8): 1314-1334, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-652792

ABSTRACT

Objective: The Inter Organizational Practice Committee (IOPC) convened a workgroup to provide rapid guidance about teleneuropsychology (TeleNP) in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.Method: A collaborative panel of experts from major professional organizations developed provisional guidance for neuropsychological practice during the pandemic. The stakeholders included the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology/American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology, the National Academy of Neuropsychology, Division 40 of the American Psychological Association, the American Board of Professional Neuropsychology, and the American Psychological Association Services, Inc. The group reviewed literature, collated federal, regional and state regulations and information from insurers, and surveyed practitioners to identify best practices.Results: Literature indicates that TeleNP may offer reliable and valid assessments, but clinicians need to consider limitations, develop new informed consent procedures, report modifications of standard procedures, and state limitations to diagnostic conclusions and recommendations. Specific limitations affect TeleNP assessments of older adults, younger children, individuals with limited access to technology, and individuals with other individual, cultural, and/or linguistic differences. TeleNP may be contraindicated or infeasible given specific patient characteristics, circumstances, and referral questions. Considerations for billing TeleNP services are offered with reservations that clinicians must verify procedures independently. Guidance about technical issues and "tips" for TeleNP procedures are provided.Conclusion: This document provides provisional guidance with links to resources and established guidelines for telepsychology. Specific recommendations extend these practices to TeleNP. These recommendations may be revised as circumstances evolve, with updates posted continuously at OPC.online.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Neuropsychology/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Academies and Institutes/standards , Advisory Committees/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Humans , Neuropsychological Tests , Neuropsychology/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , United States/epidemiology
20.
Drug Discov Ther ; 14(4): 171-176, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745657

ABSTRACT

The healthcare sector has been overwhelmed by the global rise in the number of COVID-19 cases. The primary care physicians at the forefront of this pandemic are being provided with multiple guidelines (state, national, international). The aim of this review was to examine the existing guidelines for congruence and critically analyze them in light of current evidence. A discordance was noted between the national and state guidelines with respect to indication, duration and dosage of antivirals, steroids/immunomodulators, anticoagulation and convalescent plasma. The lack of concordance between various guidelines mandates the need for a unified national guideline that is regularly updated.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , India/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Steroids/therapeutic use
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL