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2.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev ; 5(6)2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285509

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the use of text messages to communicate information to patients whose surgeries were postponed because of the COVID-19 restriction on elective surgeries. Our hypothesis was that text messaging would be an effective way to convey updates. METHODS: In this observational study, 295 patients received text messaging alerts. Eligibility included patients who had their surgery postponed and had a cell phone that received text messages. Engagement rates were determined using embedded smart links. Patient survey responses were collected. RESULTS: A total of 3,032 texts were delivered. Engagement rates averaged 90%. Survey responses (n = 111) demonstrated that 98.2% of patients liked the text messages and 95.5% said that they felt more connected to their care team; 91.9% of patients agreed that the text updates helped them avoid calling the office. Patients with higher pain levels reported more frustration with their surgery delay (5.3 versus 2.8 on 1 to 10 scale, P value < 0.01). More frustrated patients wished they received more text messages (24.4% versus 4.6%, P value = 0.04) and found the content less helpful (8.2 versus 9.2 on 1 to 10 scale, P value = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Text messaging updates are an efficient way to communicate with patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Practice Management, Medical/organization & administration , Professional-Patient Relations , Text Messaging , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment
6.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 17(7): 855-864, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-628858

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has reduced radiology volumes across the country as providers have decreased elective care to minimize the spread of infection and free up health care delivery system capacity. After the stay-at-home order was issued in our county, imaging volumes at our institution decreased to approximately 46% of baseline volumes, similar to the experience of other radiology practices. Given the substantial differences in severity and timing of the disease in different geographic regions, estimating resumption of radiology volumes will be one of the next major challenges for radiology practices. We hypothesize that there are six major variables that will likely predict radiology volumes: (1) severity of disease in the local region, including potential subsequent "waves" of infection; (2) lifting of government social distancing restrictions; (3) patient concern regarding risk of leaving home and entering imaging facilities; (4) management of pent-up demand for imaging delayed during the acute phase of the pandemic, including institutional capacity; (5) impact of the economic downturn on health insurance and ability to pay for imaging; and (6) radiology practice profile reflecting amount of elective imaging performed, including type of patients seen by the radiology practice such as emergency, inpatient, outpatient mix and subspecialty types. We encourage radiology practice leaders to use these and other relevant variables to plan for the coming weeks and to work collaboratively with local health system and governmental leaders to help ensure that needed patient care is restored as quickly as the environment will safely permit.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Management, Medical/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Workload , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
8.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 146(5): 1197-1206, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601618

ABSTRACT

The worldwide outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has forced health care systems across the United States to undertake broad restructuring to address the ongoing crisis. The framework of crisis management can assist plastic surgeons navigate the dynamic environment of the COVID-19 pandemic. This article outlines crisis management tools at a number of different levels, from hospital-wide to plastic surgeon-specific, and it offers a practical discussion of the coronavirus situation as it affects plastic surgeons. Although there are innumerable ways that this virus is currently changing plastic surgeons' practices, it is crucial to remember that these changes are temporary, and they will be best met by being confronted head-on.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Management, Medical/organization & administration , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/organization & administration , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Humans , Leadership , United States
9.
J Robot Surg ; 15(2): 251-258, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597766

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has been a life-changing experience for both individuals and institutions. We describe changes in our practice based on real-time assessment of various national and international trends of COVID-19 and its effectiveness in the management of our resources. Initial risk assessment and peak resource requirement using the COVID-19 Hospital Impact Model for Epidemics (CHIME) and McKinsey models. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of our practice's approach during the pandemic. Based on CHIME the community followed 60% social distancing, the number of expected new patients hospitalized at maximum surge would be 401, with 100 patients requiring ventilator support. In contrast, when the community followed 15% social distancing, the maximum surge of hospitalized new patients would be 1823 and 455 patients would require a ventilator. on April 15, the expected May requirement of ICU beds at peak would be 68, with 61 patients needing ventilators. The estimated surge numbers improved throughout April, and on April 22 the expected ICU bed peak in May would be 11.7, and those requiring ventilator would be 10.5. Simultaneously, within a month, our surgical waitlist grew from 585 to over 723 patients. Our SWOT analysis revealed our internal strengths and inherent weakness, relevant to the pandemic. A graded and a guarded response to this type of situation is crucial in managing patients in a large practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Models, Theoretical , Practice Management, Medical/organization & administration , Prostatic Neoplasms , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Florida/epidemiology , Health Care Rationing/methods , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Prostatic Neoplasms/therapy , Waiting Lists
11.
J Ambul Care Manage ; 43(4): 286-289, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-397491

ABSTRACT

In response to COVID-19 pandemic social distancing restrictions, ambulatory care settings have largely transitioned to virtual health care delivery. As local, state, and federal officials discuss timelines for these restrictions to be lifted, ambulatory leadership is tasked with the responsibility of developing reactivation plans for its clinics to resume in-person care. This article discusses a method in which ambulatory leadership can determine the clinic's deficit in patient encounters, set a time period to return to normal operations, planning for space and scheduling changes, balancing in-person virtual visits, and thoughtfully communicating these plans to clinic staff and providers.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Facility Closure , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Management, Medical/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
12.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 163(3): 444-446, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-378043

ABSTRACT

Efforts aimed at minimizing the spread of COVID-19 and "flattening the curve" may be affecting clinical care delivery for non-COVID-19 cases that include otolaryngologic and orbital conditions. We are witnessing changes in the manner that patients present, as well as modifications in clinical management strategies. An improved understanding of these phenomena and the contributing factors is essential for otolaryngologists to provide sound clinical care during this unprecedented pandemic.


Subject(s)
Emergencies , Orbital Diseases/therapy , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Practice Management, Medical/organization & administration , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 28(11): 464-470, 2020 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-326240

ABSTRACT

On March 14, 2020, the Surgeon General of the United States urged a widespread cessation of all elective surgery across the country. The suddenness of this mandate and the concomitant spread of the COVID-19 virus left many hospital systems, orthopaedic practices, and patients with notable anxiety and confusion as to the near, intermediate, and long-term future of our healthcare system. As with most businesses in the United States during this time, many orthopaedic practices have been emotionally and fiscally devastated because of this crisis. Furthermore, this pandemic is occurring at a time where small and midsized orthopaedic groups are already struggling to cover practice overhead and to maintain autonomy from larger health systems. It is anticipated that many groups will experience financial demise, leading to substantial global consolidation. Because the authors represent some of the larger musculoskeletal multispecialty groups in the country, we are uniquely positioned to provide a framework with recommendations to best weather the ensuing months. We think these recommendations will allow providers and their staff to return to an infrastructure that can adjust immediately to the pent-up healthcare demand that may occur after the COVID-19 pandemic. In this editorial, we address practice finances, staffing, telehealth, operational plans after the crisis, and ethical considerations.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Orthopedic Procedures/economics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Management, Medical/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Female , Health Care Costs , Humans , Male , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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