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1.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(6): 1472-1475, 2021 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629955

ABSTRACT

Human lives and nations' economies have been adversely affected worldwide by the COVID-19 pandemic. The hyperinflammatory state associated with the disease may be related to mortality. Systemic glucocorticoid is the first-line therapy for cytokine storm. Various immunomodulatory drugs such as tocilizumab and baricitinib have been used in those not responding to glucocorticoid monotherapy. Amid the peak crisis of COVID-19 in India, there was an extreme paucity of medications, oxygen, and hospital beds. We describe three patients with COVID-19 who received low-dose tofacitinib (an oral Janus kinase inhibitor) in addition to moderate-dose glucocorticoid. These patients were treated at their homes, as the hospitals were short of beds. Rapid reduction in hypoxemia along with gradual resolution of other signs of the disease were observed. The results are reassuring regarding the feasibility of managing of severe COVID-19 outside the hospital setting when healthcare resources are overwhelmed by pandemic-related caseload.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Enoxaparin/administration & dosage , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prednisone/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage
2.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(6): 1472-1475, 2021 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450911

ABSTRACT

Human lives and nations' economies have been adversely affected worldwide by the COVID-19 pandemic. The hyperinflammatory state associated with the disease may be related to mortality. Systemic glucocorticoid is the first-line therapy for cytokine storm. Various immunomodulatory drugs such as tocilizumab and baricitinib have been used in those not responding to glucocorticoid monotherapy. Amid the peak crisis of COVID-19 in India, there was an extreme paucity of medications, oxygen, and hospital beds. We describe three patients with COVID-19 who received low-dose tofacitinib (an oral Janus kinase inhibitor) in addition to moderate-dose glucocorticoid. These patients were treated at their homes, as the hospitals were short of beds. Rapid reduction in hypoxemia along with gradual resolution of other signs of the disease were observed. The results are reassuring regarding the feasibility of managing of severe COVID-19 outside the hospital setting when healthcare resources are overwhelmed by pandemic-related caseload.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Enoxaparin/administration & dosage , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prednisone/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage
4.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 7: CD013876, 2021 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320058

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Olfactory dysfunction is an early and sensitive marker of COVID-19 infection. Although self-limiting in the majority of cases, when hyposmia or anosmia persists it can have a profound effect on quality of life. Little guidance exists on the treatment of post-COVID-19 olfactory dysfunction, however several strategies have been proposed from the evidence relating to the treatment of post-viral anosmia (such as medication or olfactory training). OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of interventions that have been used, or proposed, to treat persisting olfactory dysfunction due to COVID-19 infection. A secondary objective is to keep the evidence up-to-date, using a living systematic review approach.  SEARCH METHODS: The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register; Cochrane ENT Register; CENTRAL; Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished studies. The date of the search was 16 December 2020. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials including participants who had symptoms of olfactory disturbance following COVID-19 infection. Only individuals who had symptoms for at least four weeks were included in this review. Studies compared any intervention with no treatment or placebo. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures. Primary outcomes were the recovery of sense of smell, disease-related quality of life and serious adverse effects. Secondary outcomes were the change in sense of smell, general quality of life, prevalence of parosmia and other adverse effects (including nosebleeds/bloody discharge). We used GRADE to assess the certainty of the evidence for each outcome. MAIN RESULTS: We included one study with 18 participants, which compared the use of a 15-day course of oral steroids combined with nasal irrigation (consisting of an intranasal steroid/mucolytic/decongestant solution) with no intervention. Psychophysical testing was used to assess olfactory function at baseline, 20 and 40 days. Systemic corticosteroids plus intranasal steroid/mucolytic/decongestant compared to no intervention Recovery of sense of smell was assessed after 40 days (25 days after cessation of treatment) using the Connecticut Chemosensory Clinical Research Center (CCCRC) score. This tool has a range of 0 to 100, and a score of ≥ 90 represents normal olfactory function. The evidence is very uncertain about the effect of this intervention on recovery of the sense of smell at one to three months (5/9 participants in the intervention group scored ≥ 90 compared to 0/9 in the control group; risk ratio (RR) 11.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70 to 173.66; 1 study; 18 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Change in sense of smell was assessed using the CCCRC score at 40 days. This study reported an improvement in sense of smell in the intervention group from baseline (median improvement in CCCRC score 60, interquartile range (IQR) 40) compared to the control group (median improvement in CCCRC score 30, IQR 25) (1 study; 18 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Serious adverse events andother adverse events were not identified in any participants of this study; however, it is unclear how these outcomes were assessed and recorded (1 study; 18 participants; very low-certainty evidence). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is very limited evidence available on the efficacy and harms of treatments for persistent olfactory dysfunction following COVID-19 infection. However, we have identified other ongoing trials in this area. As this is a living systematic review we will update the data regularly, as new results become available. For this (first) version of the living review we identified only one study with a small sample size, which assessed systemic steroids and nasal irrigation (intranasal steroid/mucolytic/decongestant). However, the evidence regarding the benefits and harms from this intervention to treat persistent post-COVID-19 olfactory dysfunction is very uncertain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Expectorants/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Nasal Decongestants/administration & dosage , Olfaction Disorders/drug therapy , Administration, Oral , Ambroxol/administration & dosage , Betamethasone/administration & dosage , Bias , Humans , Nasal Lavage/methods , Olfaction Disorders/etiology , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prevalence , Quality of Life , Recovery of Function , Smell/drug effects , Time Factors
6.
Blood ; 139(11): 1631-1641, 2022 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309901

ABSTRACT

18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is now established as the gold-standard imaging modality for both staging and response assessment in follicular lymphoma (FL). In this Perspective, we propose where PET can, and cannot, guide clinicians in their therapeutic approach. PET at diagnosis and pretreatment is important for staging, with greater sensitivity compared with standard CT, and consequent improved outcomes in truly limited-stage FL. Small data sets suggesting that a high baseline standardized uptake value (SUVmax) identifies de novo histologic transformation (HT) have not been corroborated by data from GALLIUM, the largest prospective study to examine modern therapies for FL. Nonetheless, the role of baseline quantitative PET measures requires further clarification. The median survival of patients with newly diagnosed FL is now potentially >20 years. Treatment of symptomatic FL aims to achieve remission and optimize quality of life for as long as possible, with many patients achieving a "functional cure" at the cost of unwanted treatment effects. Several studies have identified end-of-induction (EOI) PET after initial chemoimmunotherapy in patients with a high tumor burden as strongly predictive of both progression-free and overall survival, and EOI PET is being evaluated as a platform for response-adapted treatment. Unmet needs remain: improving the inferior survival for patients remaining PET positive and quantifying the progression-free survival and time to next treatment advantage, and additional toxicity of anti-CD20 maintenance in patients who achieve complete metabolic remission. In the absence of an overall survival advantage for frontline antibody maintenance, the question of using PET to guide the therapeutic approach is more important than ever in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , Lymphoma, Follicular/diagnosis , Lymphoma, Follicular/drug therapy , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Cyclophosphamide/administration & dosage , Doxorubicin/administration & dosage , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/methods , Pandemics , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prospective Studies , Rituximab/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vincristine/administration & dosage
7.
J Neuroimmunol ; 358: 577661, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307055

ABSTRACT

We describe the first case of hyperacute reversible encephalopathy following COVID-19 vaccination. A patient presented with acute onset encephalopathy, mainly characterized by agitation and confusion, rapidly responsive to high dosage steroid therapy and complete remission within 3 days from onset. The clinical manifestation was related with systemic and CSF cytokine hyperproduction, responsive to steroid therapy. Although the occurrence of encephalopathy after vaccination may be just a casual temporal association, we speculate that the cytokine-storm could be the result of an excessive innate immune response against the vaccine, in a predisposed patient susceptible to autoimmunity.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/chemically induced , Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cytokine Release Syndrome/chemically induced , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Acute Disease , Aged , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Humans , Male , Prednisone/administration & dosage
9.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(8): 1145-1150, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258353

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of corticosteroids among older adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia requiring oxygen. METHODS: We used routine care data from 36 hospitals in France and Luxembourg to assess the effectiveness of corticosteroids with at least 0.4 mg/kg/day equivalent prednisone (treatment group) versus standard of care (control group). Participants were adults aged 80 years or older with PCR-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection or CT scan images typical of COVID-19 pneumonia, requiring oxygen ≥3 L/min, and with an inflammatory syndrome (C-reactive protein ≥40 mg/L). The primary outcome was overall survival at day 14. In our main analysis, characteristics of patients at baseline (i.e. time when patients met all inclusion criteria) were balanced by using propensity-score inverse probability of treatment weighting. RESULTS: Among the 267 patients included in the analysis, 98 were assigned to the treatment group. Their median age was 86 years (interquartile range 83-90 years) and 95% had a SARS-CoV-2 PCR-confirmed diagnosis. In total, 43/98 (43.9%) patients in the treatment group and 84/166 (50.6%) in the control group died before day 14 (weighted hazard ratio 0.67, 95% CI 0.46-0.99). The treatment and control groups did not differ significantly for the proportion of patients discharged to home/rehabilitation at day 14 (weighted relative risk 1.12, 95% CI 0.68-1.82). Twenty-two (16.7%) patients receiving corticosteroids developed adverse events, but only 11 (6.4%) from the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Corticosteroids were associated with a significant increase in the overall survival at day 14 of patients aged 80 years and older hospitalized for severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prednisone/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , France/epidemiology , Humans , Luxembourg/epidemiology , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
10.
Lupus ; 30(9): 1515-1521, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247525

ABSTRACT

Immune thrombocytopenia, also known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), has been reported as an important complication related to COVID-19.We present a 49-year-old male patient with systemic lupus erythematosus with lupus nephritis, antiphospholipid syndrome and history of ITP who developed an ITP flare in the context of COVID-19. He had no bleeding manifestations and had a good response to prednisone treatment.We review the characteristics of the cases reported to date in the literature, with an analysis of 57 patients. Mean age was 56 years (±19.6 SD), and 50.9% were male. This was the first episode of ITP in most of the patients (86.05%), with SARS-CoV-2 acting as the initial trigger. We found that ITP flares may appear in both mild and severe COVID-19 cases. They also appeared at any time during the course of the disease, 48.2% of patients developed it during hospitalization, while it was diagnosed at admission in the rest of the cases. Platelet counts were significantly lower than other ITP series, with a median nadir platelet count of 8 × 109/L (IQR 2-17.75 × 109/L). These patients show a higher bleeding rate (61.4%) compared with other ITP series. They also show a better response to treatment, with good response to the first line therapies in 76.9% of them. The most common first-line treatment was intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), used alone or combined with corticosteroids in 40.4% and 32.7% of cases respectively, while 25% of patients received only corticosteroids.Our review suggests that COVID-19-related ITP can be seen even in previously healthy patients. Clinicians must be aware that ITP may appear both in mild and severe COVID-19, at any time during its course. Given that this kind of ITP seems to be associated with a higher bleeding risk, its diagnosis in a clinical scenario such as COVID-19, where anticoagulant therapy is frequently used, may be critical. Treatment with IVIG and/or corticoids is often effective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/diagnosis , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/drug therapy , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/virology , Treatment Outcome
11.
J Clin Pharmacol ; 61(11): 1406-1414, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241509

ABSTRACT

Glucocorticoids are frequently prescribed in inflammatory diseases and have recently experienced a boom in the treatment of COVID-19. Small studies have shown an effect of glucocorticoids on inflammatory marker levels, but definitive proof is lacking. We investigated the influence of prednisone on inflammatory biomarkers in a previous multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial that compared a 7-day treatment course of 50-mg prednisone to placebo in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. We compared levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), leukocyte and neutrophil count between patients with and without glucocorticoid treatment at baseline and on days 3, 5, and 7 and at discharge by Wilcoxon tests and analysis of variance. A total of 356 patient data sets in the prednisone group and 355 in the placebo group were available for analysis. Compared to placebo, use of prednisone was associated with reductions in levels of CRP on days 3, 5, and 7 (mean difference of 46%, P < .001 for each time point). For PCT, no such difference was observed. Leukocyte and neutrophil count were higher in the prednisone group at all time points (mean difference of 27% for leukocytes and 33% for neutrophils, P <.001 for all time points). We conclude that after administration of glucocorticoids in community-acquired pneumonia, patients had lower CRP levels and increased leukocyte and neutrophil count as compared to the placebo group. PCT levels were not different between treatment groups. PCT levels thus may more appropriately mirror the resolution of infection compared to more traditional inflammatory markers.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Community-Acquired Infections , Leukocyte Count/methods , Pneumonia , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Procalcitonin/blood , Aged, 80 and over , Analysis of Variance , Biomarkers, Pharmacological/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Community-Acquired Infections/drug therapy , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Drug Monitoring/methods , Female , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Humans , Male , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Statistics, Nonparametric
13.
Am J Kidney Dis ; 78(1): 142-145, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174714

ABSTRACT

We report on the development of minimal change disease (MCD) with nephrotic syndrome and acute kidney injury (AKI), shortly after first injection of the BNT162b2 COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech). A 50-year-old previously healthy man was admitted to our hospital following the appearance of peripheral edema. Ten days earlier, he had received the first injection of the vaccine. Four days after injection, he developed lower leg edema, which rapidly progressed to anasarca. On admission, serum creatinine was 2.31 mg/dL and 24-hour urinary protein excretion was 6.9 grams. As kidney function continued to decline over the next days, empirical treatment was initiated with prednisone 80 mg/d. A kidney biopsy was performed and the findings were consistent with MCD. Ten days later, kidney function began to improve, gradually returning to normal. The clinical triad of MCD, nephrotic syndrome, and AKI has been previously described under a variety of circumstances, but not following the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. The association between the vaccination and MCD is at this time temporal and by exclusion, and by no means firmly established. We await further reports of similar cases to evaluate the true incidence of this possible vaccine side effect.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Nephrosis, Lipoid , Nephrotic Syndrome , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , Biopsy/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Creatinine/blood , Edema/diagnosis , Edema/etiology , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nephrosis, Lipoid/diagnosis , Nephrosis, Lipoid/drug therapy , Nephrosis, Lipoid/etiology , Nephrosis, Lipoid/physiopathology , Nephrotic Syndrome/diagnosis , Nephrotic Syndrome/etiology , Renal Elimination/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Urinalysis/methods
15.
J Intern Med ; 289(6): 906-920, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066727

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic causes high global morbidity and mortality and better medical treatments to reduce mortality are needed. OBJECTIVE: To determine the added benefit of cyclosporine A (CsA), to low-dose steroid treatment, in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Open-label, non randomized pilot study of patients with confirmed infection of SARS-CoV-2 hospitalized from April to May 2020 at a single centre in Puebla, Mexico. Patients were assigned to receive either steroids or CsA plus steroids. Pneumonia severity was assessed by clinical, laboratory, and lung tomography. The death rate was evaluated at 28 days. RESULTS: A total of 209 adult patients were studied, 105 received CsA plus steroids (age 55.3 ± 13.3; 69% men), and 104 steroids alone (age 54.06 ± 13.8; 61% men). All patients received clarithromycin, enoxaparin and methylprednisolone or prednisone up to 10 days. Patient's death was associated with hypertension (RR = 3.5) and diabetes (RR = 2.3). Mortality was 22 and 35% for CsA and control groups (P = 0.02), respectively, for all patients, and 24 and 48.5% for patients with moderate to severe disease (P = 0.001). Higher cumulative clinical improvement was seen for the CsA group (Nelson Aalen curve, P = 0.001, log-rank test) in moderate to severe patients. The Cox proportional hazard analysis showed the highest HR improvement value of 2.15 (1.39-3.34, 95%CI, P = 0.0005) for CsA treatment in moderate to severe patients, and HR = 1.95 (1.35-2.83, 95%CI, P = 0.0003) for all patients. CONCLUSION: CsA used as an adjuvant to steroid treatment for COVID-19 patients showed to improve outcomes and reduce mortality, mainly in those with moderate to severe disease. Further investigation through controlled clinical trials is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cyclosporine/therapeutic use , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Prednisone/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Cyclosporine/adverse effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Treatment Outcome
17.
J Int Med Res ; 48(10): 300060520964009, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890029

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The causative virus of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may cause severe fatal pneumonia. The clinical presentation includes asymptomatic infection, severe pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure. Data pertaining to acute renal injury due to COVID-19 in patients who have undergone renal transplantation are scarce. We herein report two cases of COVID-19 along with acute kidney injury following kidney transplantation.Case presentation: Two patients with COVID-19 underwent renal transplantation and were subsequently diagnosed with acute kidney injury. The first patient presented with progressive respiratory symptoms and acute renal injury. He was treated with diuretics and suspension of immunosuppressive therapy; however, the patient died. The second patient presented with respiratory tract symptoms, hypoxemia, and progressive deterioration of renal function followed by improvement. Her mycophenolate mofetil was stopped after admission, and tacrolimus was discontinued 10 days later. Moxifloxacin and methylprednisolone were continued in combination with albumin and gamma globulin infusion. A diuretic was administered, and prednisone was gradually reduced along with tacrolimus. The patient exhibited a satisfactory clinical recovery. CONCLUSION: Patients who develop COVID-19 after kidney transplantation are at risk of acute kidney injury, and their prednisone, immunosuppressant, and gamma globulin treatment must be adjusted according to their condition.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Kidney/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Kidney/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prednisone/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients , gamma-Globulins/administration & dosage , gamma-Globulins/therapeutic use
18.
Pediatr Transplant ; 25(5): e13880, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796050

ABSTRACT

We describe the successful pediatric liver transplant for unresectable hepatoblastoma in a 4-year-old male with COVID-19 prior to transplant. The first negative NP swab was documented 1 month after initial diagnosis, when SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were also detected. The patient was actively listed for liver transplant after completing four blocks of a SIOPEL-4 based regimen due to his PRETEXT IV disease which remained unresectable. Following three additional negative NP swabs and resolution of symptoms for 4 weeks, he underwent a whole-organ pediatric liver transplant. COVID-19 positivity determined via NP swab SARS-CoV-2 real-time RT-PCR (Hologic Aptima SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR assay). IgG and IgM total SARS- CoV-2 antibodies detected by Ortho Clinical Diagnostics VITROS® Immunodiagnostics Products Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Test. Patient received standard prednisone and tacrolimus-based immunosuppression without induction therapy following transplant. Post-transplant course was remarkable for neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, with discharge home on post-transplant day #11. Surveillance tests have remained negative with persistent SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies at 6 weeks after transplant. We describe one of the earliest, if not the first case of liver transplant following recent recovery from COVID-19 in a pediatric patient with a lethal malignant liver tumor. A better understanding of how to balance the risk profile of transplant in the setting of COVID-19 with disease progression if transplant is not performed is needed. We followed existing ASTS guidelines to document clearance of the viral infection and resolution of symptoms before transplant. This case highlights that pediatric liver transplantation can be safely performed upon clearance of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hepatoblastoma/surgery , Liver Neoplasms/surgery , Liver Transplantation/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Testing , Child, Preschool , Disease Progression , Hepatoblastoma/complications , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Liver Neoplasms/complications , Male , Neutropenia/complications , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Tacrolimus/administration & dosage , Thrombocytopenia/complications , Treatment Outcome
19.
J Gastrointestin Liver Dis ; 29(3): 470, 2020 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729795
20.
Br J Haematol ; 191(3): 386-389, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697165

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically challenged care for cancer patients, especially those with active treatment who represent a vulnerable population for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Aggressive lymphoid neoplasms, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma and high-grade B cell lymphoma, need to be treated without delay in order to get the best disease outcome. Because of that, our clinical practice was changed to minimise the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection while continuing haematological treatment. In this report, we analyse the management of front-line therapy in 18 patients during the COVID-19 outbreak, as well as the results of the implemented measures in their outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/drug therapy , Pandemics , Plasmablastic Lymphoma/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Cyclophosphamide/administration & dosage , Cyclophosphamide/adverse effects , Doxorubicin/administration & dosage , Doxorubicin/adverse effects , Febrile Neutropenia/chemically induced , Febrile Neutropenia/prevention & control , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prednisone/adverse effects , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Spain/epidemiology , Superinfection/drug therapy , Vincristine/administration & dosage , Vincristine/adverse effects
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