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1.
Placenta ; 115: 146-150, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514252

ABSTRACT

There is inadequate screening for SARS-COV-2 during pregnancy. We aimed to determine the impact of maternal and neonatal cord blood SARS-COV-2 antibodies and placental transfer ratios in a region with a low screening plan. We performed a blind study in one of the SARS-CoV-2 epicenters in South America. 32% of pregnant women were serological positive. Importantly, there is an efficient passive immunization of the fetus to SARS-CoV-2. We report high incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy, which is higher than officially reported. Therefore the need of active immunization to enhance maternal protection and fetal passive immunization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fetal Blood/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Ecuador/epidemiology , Female , Fetal Blood/metabolism , Humans , Immunization, Passive/statistics & numerical data , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Incidence , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Young Adult
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2132563, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499193

ABSTRACT

Importance: Although several studies have provided information on short-term clinical outcomes in children with perinatal exposure to SARS-CoV-2, data on the immune response in the first months of life among newborns exposed to the virus in utero are lacking. Objective: To characterize systemic and mucosal antibody production during the first 2 months of life among infants who were born to mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2. Design, Setting, and Participants: This prospective cohort study enrolled 28 pregnant women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection and who gave birth at Policlinico Umberto I in Rome, Italy, from November 2020 to May 2021, and their newborns. Maternal and neonatal systemic immune responses were investigated by detecting spike-specific antibodies in serum, and the mucosal immune response was assessed by measuring specific antibodies in maternal breastmilk and infant saliva 48 hours after delivery and 2 months later. Exposures: Maternal infection with SARS-CoV-2 in late pregnancy. Main Outcomes and Measures: The systemic immune response was evaluated by the detection of SARS-CoV-2 IgG and IgA antibodies and receptor binding domain-specific IgM antibodies in maternal and neonatal serum. The mucosal immune response was assessed by measuring spike-specific antibodies in breastmilk and in infant saliva, and the presence of antigen-antibody spike IgA immune complexes was investigated in breastmilk samples. All antibodies were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: In total, 28 mother-infant dyads (mean [SD] maternal age, 31.8 [6.4] years; mean [SD] gestational age, 38.1 [2.3] weeks; 18 [60%] male infants) were enrolled at delivery, and 21 dyads completed the study at 2 months' follow-up. Because maternal infection was recent in all cases, transplacental transfer of virus spike-specific IgG antibodies occurred in only 1 infant. One case of potential vertical transmission and 1 case of horizontal infection were observed. Virus spike protein-specific salivary IgA antibodies were significantly increased (P = .01) in infants fed breastmilk (0.99 arbitrary units [AU]; IQR, 0.39-1.68 AU) vs infants fed an exclusive formula diet (0.16 AU; IQR, 0.02-0.83 AU). Maternal milk contained IgA spike immune complexes at 48 hours (0.53 AU; IQR, 0.25-0.39 AU) and at 2 months (0.09 AU; IQR, 0.03-0.17 AU) and may have functioned as specific stimuli for the infant mucosal immune response. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, SARS-CoV-2 spike-specific IgA antibodies were detected in infant saliva, which may partly explain why newborns are resistant to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Mothers infected in the peripartum period appear to not only passively protect the newborn via breastmilk secretory IgA but also actively stimulate and train the neonatal immune system via breastmilk immune complexes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Milk, Human/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/isolation & purification , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/isolation & purification , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Saliva/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
4.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258754, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477539

ABSTRACT

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been successfully applied to patients with COVID-19 to prevent endotracheal intubation. However, experience of CPAP application in pregnant women with acute respiratory failure (ARF) due to SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia is scarce. This study aimed to describe the natural history and outcome of ARF in a cohort of pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, focusing on the feasibility of helmet CPAP (h-CPAP) application and the variables related to ARF worsening. A retrospective, observational study enrolling 41 consecutive pregnant women hospitalised for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in a tertiary care center between March 2020 and March 2021. h-CPAP was applied if arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen ratio (PaO2/FiO2) was inferior to 200 and/or patients had respiratory distress despite adequate oxygen supplementation. Characteristics of patients requiring h-CPAP vs those in room air or oxygen only were compared. Twenty-seven (66%) patients showed hypoxemic ARF requiring oxygen supplementation and h-CPAP was needed in 10 cases (24%). PaO2/FiO2 was significantly improved during h-CPAP application. The device was well-tolerated in all cases with no adverse events. Higher serum C reactive protein and more extensive (≥3 lobes) involvement at chest X-ray upon admission were observed in the h-CPAP group. Assessment of temporal distribution of cases showed a substantially increased rate of CPAP requirement during the third pandemic wave (January-March 2021). In conclusion, h-CPAP was feasible, safe, well-tolerated and improved oxygenation in pregnant women with moderate-to-severe ARF due to SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. Moderate-to-severe ARF was more frequently observed during the third pandemic wave.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Respiratory Insufficiency , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Tertiary Care Centers , Acute Disease , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Oxygen/blood , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Protein C/metabolism , Respiratory Insufficiency/blood , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies
6.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211039288, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448131

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a systemic disease that can be life-threatening involving immune and inflammatory responses, and that can result in potentially lethal complications, including venous thrombo-embolism (VTE). Forming an integrative approach to thrombo-prophylaxis and coagulation treatment for COVID-19 patients ensues. We aim at reviewing the literature for anticoagulation in the setting of COVID-19 infection to provide a summary on anticoagulation for this patient population. COVID-19 infection is associated with a state of continuous inflammation, which results in macrophage activation syndrome and an increased rate of thrombosis. Risk assessment models to predict the risk of thrombosis in critically ill patients have not yet been validated. Currently published guidelines suggest the use of prophylactic intensity over intermediate intensity or therapeutic intensity anticoagulant for patients with critical illness or acute illness related to COVID-19 infection. Critically ill COVID-19 patients who are diagnosed with acute VTE are considered to have a provoking factor, and, therefore, treatment duration should be at least 3 months. Patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism should receive parenteral over oral anticoagulants with low-molecular-weight heparin or fondaparinux preferred over unfractionated heparin. In patients with impending hemodynamic compromise due to PE, and who are not at increased risk for bleeding, reperfusion may be necessary. Internists should remain updated on new emerging evidence regarding anticoagulation for COVID-19 patients. Awaiting these findings, we invite internists to perform individualized decisions that are unique for every patient and to base them on clinical judgment for risk assessment.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Consensus , Critical Illness , Disease Management , Factor Xa Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fondaparinux/adverse effects , Fondaparinux/therapeutic use , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Heparin/adverse effects , Heparin/therapeutic use , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/administration & dosage , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/adverse effects , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Risk , Thrombophilia/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
8.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol ; 213: 105964, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433601

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the vitamin D status of pregnant women with COVID-19, and the association between vitamin D level and severity of COVID-19. METHODS: In this case control study, 159 women with a single pregnancy and tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, and randomly selected 332 healthy pregnant women with similar gestational ages were included. COVID-19 patients were classified as mild, moderate, and severe. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxycholecalciferol <20 ng/mL (50 nmol/L), and 25-OH D vitamin <10 ng/mL was defined as severe vitamin D deficiency, also 25-OH D vitamin level between 20-29 ng/mL (525-725 nmol/L) was defined as vitamin D insufficiency. RESULTS: Vitamin D levels of the pregnant women in the COVID-19 group (12.46) were lower than the control group (18.76). 25-OH D vitamin levels of those in the mild COVID-19 category (13.69) were significantly higher than those in the moderate/severe category (9.06). In terms of taking vitamin D supplementation, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. However, it was observed that all of those who had severe COVID-19 were the patients who did not take vitamin D supplementation. CONCLUSION: The vitamin D levels are low in pregnant women with COVID-19. Also, there is a significant difference regarding to vitamin D level and COVID-19 severity in pregnant women. Maintenance of adequate vitamin D level can be useful as an approach for the prevention of an aggressive course of the inflammation induced by this novel coronavirus in pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diet therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diet therapy , Dietary Supplements , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diet therapy , Vitamin D Deficiency/diet therapy , Vitamin D/administration & dosage , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Calcifediol/blood , Case-Control Studies , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/pathology , Vitamin D Deficiency/virology
9.
Rev Bras Ginecol Obstet ; 43(8): 595-599, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428974

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the hematological changes, the platelet indices in particular, in pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) compared to healthy pregnant women. METHODS: A retrospective case-control study conducted at the Al Yarmouk Teaching Hospital, in Baghdad, Iraq, involving 100 pregnant women, 50 with positive viral DNA for COVID-19 (case group), and 50 with negative results (control group); both groups were subjected to a thorough hematological evaluation. RESULTS: Among the main hematological variables analyzed, the platelet indices, namely the mean platelet volume (MPV) and the platelet distribution width (PDW), showed statistically significant differences (MPV: 10.87 ± 66.92 fL for the case group versus 9.84 ± 1.2 fL for the control group; PDW: 14.82 ± 3.18 fL for the case group versus 13.3 ± 2.16 fL for the controls). The criterion value of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for PDW at a cutoff point of > 11.8 fL showed a weak diagnostic marker, while the MPV at a cutoff value of > 10.17 fL showed a good diagnostic marker. CONCLUSION: The MPV and PDW are significantly affected by the this viral infection, even in asymptomatic confirmed cases, and we recommend that both parameters be included in the diagnostic panel of this infection.


Descrever as alterações hematológicas, em particular os índices plaquetários em gestantes com doença coronavírus 2019 (COVID-19) em comparação com gestantes saudáveis. MéTODOS: Estudo caso-controle retrospectivo realizado no Hospital Universitário Al Yarmouk, em Bagdá, Iraque envolvendo 100 gestantes, 50 com DNA viral positivo para COVID-19 (grupo caso) e 50 com resultados negativos (grupo controle); ambos os grupos foram submetidos a uma avaliação hematológica completa. Entre as principais variáveis hematológicas analisadas, os índices plaquetários, nomeadamente o volume plaquetário médio (VPM) e a largura de distribuição plaquetária (PDW), apresentaram diferenças estatisticamente significativas (VPM: 10,87 ± 66,92 fL para o grupo caso versus 9,84 ± 1.2 fL para o o grupo controle; PDW: 14,82 ± 3,18 fL para o grupo caso versus 13,3 ± 2,16 fL para os controles). O valor de critério da curva de característica de operação do receptor (ROC) para PDW em um ponto de corte de> 11,8 fL mostrou um marcador diagnóstico fraco, enquanto o do VPM em um valor de corte de> 10,17 fL mostrou um bom marcador de diagnóstico. CONCLUSãO: O MPV e PDW são significativamente afetados por esta infecção viral, mesmo em casos confirmados assintomáticos, e recomendamos que ambos os parâmetros sejam incluídos no painel de diagnóstico desta infecção.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Adult , Asymptomatic Diseases , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Platelets/physiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Mean Platelet Volume , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies
10.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4677, 2021 07 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387356

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection can affect all human beings, including pregnant women. Thus, understanding the immunological changes induced by the virus during pregnancy is nowadays of pivotal importance. Here, using peripheral blood from 14 pregnant women with asymptomatic or mild SARS-CoV-2 infection, we investigate cell proliferation and cytokine production, measure plasma levels of 62 cytokines, and perform a 38-parameter mass cytometry analysis. Our results show an increase in low density neutrophils but no lymphopenia or gross alterations of white blood cells, which display normal levels of differentiation, activation or exhaustion markers and show well preserved functionality. Meanwhile, the plasma levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1RA, IL-10 and IL-19 are increased, those of IL-17, PD-L1 and D-dimer are decreased, but IL-6 and other inflammatory molecules remain unchanged. Our profiling of antiviral immune responses may thus help develop therapeutic strategies to avoid virus-induced damages during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Asymptomatic Infections , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/prevention & control , Inflammation/virology , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
12.
Reprod Sci ; 28(10): 2939-2941, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321928

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women display a higher risk of progression to disease and higher viral loads during infections due to their more permissive, tolerogenic immune system. However, only few studies have focused on SARS-CoV-2 intrapartum vertical transmission via vaginal secretions or faeces. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of the virus in vaginal, rectal and blood specimens from pregnant women characterized by different COVID-19 disease severity. We enrolled 56 SARS-CoV-2-positive pregnant women, of which 46 (82%) were in the third trimester of pregnancy, 6 (10%) in the second and 4 (7%) in the first. QPCR was performed to detect the virus in vaginal and rectal swabs and in plasma samples. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in 27% of rectal swabs of pregnant women in the third trimester, while no virus particles were detected in vaginal swabs of the same patients. Furthermore, only 4% plasma samples tested positive to SARS-CoV-2. No virus was detected in newborn's nasopharyngeal swabs. Despite the low number of subjects enrolled, our data suggest that, while theoretically possible, intrapartum vaginal or orofecal SARS-CoV-2 transmission seems to be unlikely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Nasopharynx/virology , Parturition , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Rectum/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vagina/virology , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Young Adult
13.
Int J Lab Hematol ; 43 Suppl 1: 29-35, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319315

ABSTRACT

Vascular endothelial injury is a hallmark of acute infection at both the microvascular and macrovascular levels. The hallmark of SARS-CoV-2 infection is the current COVID-19 clinical sequelae of the pathophysiologic responses of hypercoagulability and thromboinflammation associated with acute infection. The acute lung injury that initially occurs in COVID-19 results from vascular and endothelial damage from viral injury and pathophysiologic responses that produce the COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. Clinicians should continue to focus on the vascular endothelial injury that occurs and evaluate potential therapeutic interventions that may benefit those with new infections during the current pandemic as they may also be of benefit for future pathogens that generate similar thromboinflammatory responses. The current Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV) studies are important projects that will further define our management strategies. At the time of writing this report, two mRNA vaccines are now being distributed and will hopefully have a major impact on slowing the global spread and subsequent thromboinflammatory injury we see clinically in critically ill patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/etiology , Vasculitis/etiology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Child , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Endothelium, Vascular/injuries , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Female , Fibrinolysis , Forecasting , Humans , Lung/blood supply , Lung/pathology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Thromboembolism/etiology , Thromboembolism/prevention & control
14.
Cells ; 10(7)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314589

ABSTRACT

MicroRNAs are gene expression regulators associated with several human pathologies, including those generated by viral infections. Their role in SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 has been investigated and reviewed in many informative studies; however, a thorough miRNA outline in SARS-CoV-2-infected pregnant women (SIPW), at both systemic and placental levels, is missing. To fill this gap, blood and placenta biopsies collected at delivery from 15 asymptomatic SIPW were immediately analysed for: miRNA expression (n = 84) (QPCR array), antiviral/immune mRNA target expression (n = 74) (QGene) and cytokine/chemokines production (n = 27) (Multiplex ELISA). By comparing these results with those obtained from six uninfected pregnant women (UPW), we observed that, following SARS-CoV-2 infection, the transcriptomic profile of pregnant women is significantly altered in different anatomical districts, even in the absence of clinical symptoms and vertical transmission. This characteristic combination of miRNA and antiviral/immune factors seems to control both the infection and the dysfunctional immune reaction, thus representing a positive correlate of protection and a potential therapeutic target against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/genetics , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , MicroRNAs/analysis , MicroRNAs/blood , Placenta/metabolism , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Transcriptome , Young Adult
16.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis ; 31(7): 2151-2155, 2021 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246118

ABSTRACT

AIM: To discuss available information on the opportunity for pregnant women affected by diabetes/obesity to receive COVID-19 vaccine. DATA SYNTHESIS: Pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection are at high risk for severe acute respiratory syndrome and adverse outcomes. Pregnant women with severe COVID-19 present increased rates of preterm delivery (<37 gestational weeks), cesarean delivery and neonatal admissions to the intensive care unit. Comorbidity such as diabetes (pregestational or gestational) or obesity further increased maternal and fetal complications. It is known that diabetic or obese patients with COVID-19 present an unfavorable course and a worse prognosis, with a direct association between worse outcome and suboptimal glycol-metabolic control or body mass index (BMI) levels. Critical COVID-19 infection prevention is important for both mother and fetus. Vaccination during pregnancy is a common practice. Vaccines against COVID-19 are distributed across the world with some population considered to have a priority. Since pregnant women are excluded from clinical trials very little information are available on safety and efficacy of COVD-19 vaccines during pregnancy. However, it is well known the concept of passive immunization of the newborn obtained with transplacental passage of protective antibodies into the fetal/neonatal circulation after maternal infection or vaccination. Moreover, it has been reported that COVID-19 vaccine-induced IgG pass to the neonates through breastmilk. Therefore, maternal vaccination can protect mother, fetus and baby. CONCLUSIONS: After an individual risk/benefit evaluation pregnant and lactating women should be counselled to receive COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Diabetes, Gestational/blood , Lactation , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy in Diabetics/blood , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vaccination , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Clinical Decision-Making , Diabetes, Gestational/diagnosis , Diabetes, Gestational/therapy , Female , Glycemic Control , Humans , Immunity, Maternally-Acquired , Maternal-Fetal Exchange , Milk, Human/immunology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy in Diabetics/diagnosis , Pregnancy in Diabetics/therapy , Prenatal Care , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/adverse effects
17.
Curr Med Sci ; 41(2): 306-311, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1193159

ABSTRACT

This retrospective study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and neonatal outcomes of pregnant women with SARS-COV-2 in Wuhan Children's Hospital and further suggested a possible management strategy for infected pregnant women under epidemic situation. In this study, 8 pregnant women with SARS-COV-2 who were admitted into Wuhan Children's Hospital, China from February 1, 2020 to March 30, 2020 and the clinical features, laboratory data, maternal and neonatal outcomes were analyzed. The mean age of the women at the time of admission was 30.6 years. The mean gestational age of the women was 37 weeks+4 days, and one woman presented with dichorionic diamniotic (DCDA) twin pregnancy. Except for one woman who was febrile, others had no typical clinical symptoms. For all pregnant women, the count of white blood cells and lymphocytes appeared normal, but 6 had a lower percentage of lymphocytes. C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were normal for all the women. One neonate was tested positive for the coronavirus IgG and IgM antibodies. The clinical symptoms of the pregnant women with SARS-COV-2 were mild, and the laboratory data showed similar characteristics to those of non-infected pregnant women. Since one neonate was tested positive for coronavirus, there is a possibility of vertical transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Prompt and efficient screening, triage, and isolation of pregnant women are effective management strategies to reduce nosocomial infection during the SARS-COV-2 epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Infant , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnant Women , Retrospective Studies
18.
Rev Bras Ginecol Obstet ; 43(3): 200-206, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189328

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Covid-19 became a pandemic, and researchers have not been able to establish a treatment algorithm. The pregnant population is also another concern for health care professionals. There are physiological changes related to pregnancy that result in different laboratory levels, radiological findings and disease progression. The goal of the present article is to determine whether the laboratory results and radiological findings were different in non-pregnant women (NPWs) of reproductive age and pregnant women (PWs) diagnosed with the Covid-19 infection. METHODS: Out of 34 patients, 15 (44.11%) PWs and 19 (55.8%) NPWs were included in the study. Age, comorbidities, complaints, vitals, respiratory rates, computed tomography (CT) findings and stages, as well as laboratory parameters, were recorded from the hospital database. RESULTS: The mean age of the PWs was of 27.6 ± 0.99 years, and that of the NPWs was of 37.63 ± 2.00; when age was compared between the groups, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.001) was found. The mean systolic blood pressure of the PWs was of 116.53 ± 11.35, and that of the NPWs was of 125.53 ± 13.00, and their difference was statistically significant (p = 0.05). The difference in the minimum respiratory rates of the patients was also statistically significant (p = 0.05). The platelet levels observed among the PWs with Covid-19 were lower than those of the NPWs (185.40 ± 39.09 × 109/mcL and 232.00 ± 71.04 × 109/mcL respectively; p = 0.05). The mean D-dimer value of the PWs was lower in comparison to that of the NPWs (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The laboratory findings and imaging studies may differ between pregnant and non-pregnant populations. It is important to properly interpret these studies. Future studies with a higher number of patients are required to confirm these preliminary data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies
19.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 150(1): 58-63, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1187994

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study chest CT images and clinical characteristics of COVID-19 pneumonia in pregnant patients to examine any correlation. METHODS: Between December 31, 2019 and March 7, 2020, 23 hospitalized pregnant patients with confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled in the study. Clinical presentations were collected retrospectively from records, including laboratory testing, chest CT imaging, and symptoms. Descriptive analysis and correlation of patients' clinical and CT characteristics were performed. Laboratory results from time of first admission and CT absorption (defined as reduction in lesion area, decrease in density, and absorption of some solid components) were compared between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. RESULTS: Fifteen (65.2%) patients were asymptomatic with patchy ground-glass opacity in a single lung lobe. Eight (34.8%) patients were symptomatic with multiple patchy ground-glass shadows, consolidation, and fibrous stripes. Differences in lymphocyte percentage and neutrophil granulocyte rate between first admission and CT absorption were significant (P<0.001). Median absorption time was shorter in the asymptomatic group compared with the symptomatic group (5 vs 10 days; P<0.001). Median hospitalization time between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients was 14 vs 25.5 days; P>0.001. Median absorption time and length of hospitalization for all patients was 6 days (IQR 5-8) and 17 days (IQR 13-25), respectively. CONCLUSION: Radiological findings and clinical characteristics in pregnant women with COVID-19 were similar to those of non-pregnant women with COVID-19. Median absorption time and length of hospitalization in asymptomatic patients were significantly shorter than in symptomatic patients. Lymphocyte percentage and neutrophil granulocyte rate may be used as laboratory indicators of CT absorption.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/virology , Lymphocytes , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig ; 42(1): 57-62, 2021 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1076284

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is rapidly spreading all over the world. Although in many cases the infection causes very weak symptoms, it can be severe in patient with diverse chronical diseases and immunological compromising patients. Pregnancy is a unique condition in which mother and fetus peacefully collaborate. Diverse endocrine-immune mechanisms, mostly under progesterone control work together to protect the fetus from maternal immunocompetent cell activation driven rejection. The physiological shift to Th2 dominant environment, while favourable for fetus, it makes mothers susceptible to infective pathogens, making pregnancy during COVID-19 pandemic challenging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Studies involving COVID-19 in pregnancy and those analysing changes of immune system induced by COVID-19 were searched in databases such as PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar and ScienceDirect. Databases were searched using a keyword COVID-19/coronavirus, that was combined with following terms: immune system, pregnancy, oestrogen, or progesterone. Search included studies published up to 01.07.2020. Almost 1,500 articles were found, but only 18 met criteria. RESULTS: Most frequent symptoms of COVID-19 in mothers infected in the late pregnancy were fever and cough accompanied with lymphopenia and elevated C-reactive protein. Mothers reported to have severe disease had comorbidities and were obese. Low rate of neonatal complications of maternal Sars-Coc-2 infection without neonatal mortality was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Currently available data didn't show significant relationship between COVID-19 severity and pregnancy and there is no strong evidence that mother's infection can lead to adverse pregnancy outcome, but further studies are needed to determinate the possible effects of COVID-19 gained during earlier pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Pregnancy Outcome , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Comorbidity , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
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