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1.
BMJ ; 369: m1672, 2020 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078903

ABSTRACT

Guideline: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection in pregnancyPublished by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), with input from the Royal College of Midwives, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPH), the Royal College of Anaesthetists, and the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association.This summary is based on version 8 of the guideline, published on 17 April 2020 (https://www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/guidelines/2020-04-17-coronavirus-covid-19-infection-in-pregnancy.pdf).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Postnatal Care , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Prenatal Care , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
2.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 730, 2022 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043117

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy is intriguing in view of its safety profile in pregnancy and historical precedence of the use of plasma for other viral illnesses. This study aimed to evaluate the use of CCP in pregnant women with early COVID-19 infection. METHODS: This is a retrospective case series study. We have included seven pregnant women admitted with early COVID-19 infection to a tertiary care hospital, Latifa Maternity Hospital in Dubai, United Arab Emirates between 12 February and 04 March 2021 and who consented to receive COVID-19 convalescent plasma as part of their treatment plan. Main outcomes measured were clinical and radiological features, laboratory tests, WHO clinical progression scale pre and post treatment, and maternal, fetal outcomes. COVID-19 clinical severity was classified according to the NIH guidelines for criteria of SARS-CoV-2. For the radiological features, a modified chest X-ray scoring system was used where each lung was divided into 6 zones (3 on each side upper, middle, and lower). Opacities were classified into reticular, ground glass, patchy and dense consolidations patterns. RESULTS: Seven pregnant women with early COVID-19 were enrolled in this study, their mean age was 28 years (SD 3.6). Four had comorbidities: 2 with diabetes, 1 with asthma, and 1 was obese. Five patients were admitted with a WHO clinical progression score of 4 (hospitalized; with no oxygen therapy) and 2 with a score of 5 (hospitalized; oxygen by mask/nasal prongs). Upon follow up on day 10, 6 patients had a WHO score of 1 or 2 (asymptomatic/mild symptoms) indicating clinical recovery. Adverse reactions were reported in 2 patients, one reported a mild skin rash, and another developed transfusion related circulatory overload. All patients were discharged alive. CONCLUSION: CCP seems to be a promising modality of treating COVID-19 infected pregnant women. However, further studies are needed to ascertain the efficacy of CCP in preventing progressive disease in the management of COVID-19 infection in pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunization, Passive , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitals, Maternity , Humans , Immunization, Passive/adverse effects , Patient Discharge , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , United Arab Emirates
3.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(9): 1185-1196, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1990598

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Management and outcomes of pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) remain to be investigated. METHODS: A retrospective multicenter study conducted in 32 ICUs in France, Belgium and Switzerland. Maternal management as well as maternal and neonatal outcomes were reported. RESULTS: Among the 187 pregnant women with COVID-19 (33 ± 6 years old and 28 ± 7 weeks' gestation), 76 (41%) were obese, 12 (6%) had diabetes mellitus and 66 (35%) had pregnancy-related complications. Standard oxygenation, high-flow nasal oxygen therapy (HFNO) and non-invasive ventilation (NIV) were used as the only oxygenation technique in 41 (22%), 55 (29%) and 18 (10%) patients, respectively, and 73 (39%) were intubated. Overall, 72 (39%) patients required several oxygenation techniques and 15 (8%) required venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Corticosteroids and tocilizumab were administered in 157 (84%) and 25 (13%) patients, respectively. Awake prone positioning or prone positioning was performed in 49 (26%) patients. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for intubation were obesity (cause-specific hazard ratio (CSH) 2.00, 95% CI (1.05-3.80), p = 0.03), term of pregnancy (CSH 1.07, 95% CI (1.02-1.10), per + 1 week gestation, p = 0.01), extent of computed tomography (CT) scan abnormalities > 50% (CSH 2.69, 95% CI (1.30-5.60), p < 0.01) and NIV use (CSH 2.06, 95% CI (1.09-3.90), p = 0.03). Delivery was required during ICU stay in 70 (37%) patients, mainly due to maternal respiratory worsening, and improved the driving pressure and oxygenation. Maternal and fetal/neonatal mortality rates were 1% and 4%, respectively. The rate of maternal and/or neonatal complications increased with the invasiveness of maternal respiratory support. CONCLUSION: In ICU, corticosteroids, tocilizumab and prone positioning were used in few pregnant women with COVID-19. Over a third of patients were intubated and delivery improved the driving pressure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 119, 2022 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974120

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The provision of care to pregnant persons and neonates must continue through pandemics. To maintain quality of care, while minimizing physical contact during the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-related Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV2) pandemic, hospitals and international organizations issued recommendations on maternity and neonatal care delivery and restructuring of clinical and academic services. Early in the pandemic, recommendations relied on expert opinion, and offered a one-size-fits-all set of guidelines. Our aim was to examine these recommendations and provide the rationale and context to guide clinicians, administrators, educators, and researchers, on how to adapt maternity and neonatal services during the pandemic, regardless of jurisdiction. METHOD: Our initial database search used Medical subject headings and free-text search terms related to coronavirus infections, pregnancy and neonatology, and summarized relevant recommendations from international society guidelines. Subsequent targeted searches to December 30, 2020, included relevant publications in general medical and obstetric journals, and updated society recommendations. RESULTS: We identified 846 titles and abstracts, of which 105 English-language publications fulfilled eligibility criteria and were included in our study. A multidisciplinary team representing clinicians from various disciplines, academics, administrators and training program directors critically appraised the literature to collate recommendations by multiple jurisdictions, including a quaternary care Canadian hospital, to provide context and rationale for viable options. INTERPRETATION: There are different schools of thought regarding effective practices in obstetric and neonatal services. Our critical review presents the rationale to effectively modify services, based on the phase of the pandemic, the prevalence of infection in the population, and resource availability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Maternal-Child Health Services/organization & administration , Perinatal Care , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/therapy , Canada , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Inpatients , Organizational Policy , Outpatients , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Reprod Sci ; 29(8): 2342-2349, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1943860

ABSTRACT

The course of COVID-19 has been shown to be worse in pregnant women compared with their non-pregnant counterparts. The aim of this study is to share our experience treating pregnant women with COVID-19 and to establish a cohort for future studies of the long-term effects of the disease. We reviewed medical records of all SARS-CoV-2-positive pregnant women who were treated at our hospital for any reason, be it COVID-19 related or not, between April 2020 and February 2021. We extracted data regarding medical history, course of pregnancy, delivery, and neonatal outcomes. A total of 193 SARS-CoV-2-positive pregnant women were treated at our establishment during the study period, half of which were asymptomatic. Sixteen were hospitalized for COVID-19 symptoms, the most common being fatigue/malaise (58%) and cough (48%). Three women required mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment. One hundred forty-four SARS-CoV-2-positive women were delivered during the study period. Of them, 24 (17%) underwent induction of labor, and four (17%) were due to symptomatic COVID-19. One hundred fifteen (80%) experienced vaginal delivery, and 29 (20%) underwent cesarean delivery. Neonatal outcomes were favorable; only 2% of 5-min Apgar scores were < 7, and all umbilical cord pH levels were > 7.1. Six infants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2; they were all asymptomatic, and none required treatment for viral infection. COVID-19 during pregnancy is a disease with potential substantial adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. There is still much unknown regarding the long-term effects of the disease on parturients and their offspring.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Gac Med Mex ; 158(2): 69-77, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934904

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In pregnant women, a higher risk for developing viral respiratory infections is identified. OBJECTIVE: To analyze sociodemographic characteristics, evolution, clinical manifestations, and complications of pregnant women hospitalized with COVID-19. METHODS: Study conducted at 11 public hospitals; sociodemographic variables, comorbidities, signs and symptoms, laboratory and imaging findings, pregnancy characteristics, treatment and pregnancy outcome were included for analysis. RESULTS: Age ranged between 15 and 40 years; 85.1% were at third trimester of pregnancy, 11.9% at second and 3% at first; 27% had any comorbidity such as obesity, hypertension or asthma; 89.5% had fever, 73.1% cough, 44.8% dyspnea, 43.3% headache and 35.8% myalgia. Diagnoses were mild disease (55.2%), mild pneumonia (26.9%), severe pneumonia (10.4%), severe pneumonia with acute respiratory distress syndrome (4.5%), and severe pneumonia with septic shock (3%); 76.2% had noninvasive oxygen support, and 9%, mechanical ventilation. Pregnancy was interrupted in 53.8%; 95.5% were discharged due to improvement of their condition and 4.5% died. CONCLUSIONS: Age range and symptoms are consistent with those previously reported. Evidence was found of an increase in cesarean section without a clear indication in women with COVID-19.


INTRODUCCIÓN: En las mujeres embarazadas se identifica mayor riesgo de desarrollar infecciones respiratorias virales. OBJETIVO: Analizar características sociodemográficas, evolución, manifestaciones clínicas y complicaciones en mujeres embarazadas con COVID-19 que fueron hospitalizadas. MÉTODOS: Estudio en 11 hospitales públicos; se incluyeron variables sociodemográficas, comorbilidades, síntomas y signos, hallazgos de laboratorio y gabinete, características del embarazo, tratamiento y desenlace de la gestación. RESULTADOS: La edad osciló entre 15 y 40 años; 85.1 % cursaba el tercer trimestre del embarazo, 11.9 % el segundo y 3 % el primero; 27 % presentó alguna comorbilidad como obesidad, hipertensión o asma; 89.5 % presentó fiebre, 73.1 % tos, 44.8 % disnea, 43.3 % cefalea y 35.8 % mialgias. Los diagnósticos fueron enfermedad leve (55.2 %), neumonía leve (26.9 %), neumonía severa (10.4 %), neumonía severa con síndrome de distrés respiratorio agudo (4.5 %) y neumonía severa con choque séptico (3 %); 76.2 % recibió soporte de oxígeno no invasivo y 9 %, ventilación mecánica. Se interrumpió el embarazo en 53.8 %; 95.5 % egresó por mejoría y 4.5 % falleció. CONCLUSIONES: El rango de edad y los síntomas coinciden con los señalados en la literatura especializada. En mujeres con COVID-19 se evidenció el incremento de la operación cesárea sin una indicación clara.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cesarean Section , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women , Young Adult
7.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 11758, 2022 07 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1927101

ABSTRACT

Brazil presented a very high number of maternal deaths and evident delays in healthcare. We aimed at evaluating the characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 infection and associated outcomes in the obstetric population. We conducted a prospective cohort study in 15 Brazilian centers including symptomatic pregnant or postpartum women with suspected COVID-19 from Feb/2020 to Feb/2021. Women were followed from suspected infection until the end of pregnancy. We analyzed maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes associated with confirmed COVID-19 infection and SARS, determining unadjusted risk ratios. In total, 729 symptomatic women with suspected COVID-19 were initially included. Among those investigated for COVID-19, 51.3% (n = 289) were confirmed COVID-19 and 48% (n = 270) were negative. Initially (before May 15th), only 52.9% of the suspected cases were tested and it was the period with the highest proportion of ICU admission and maternal deaths. Non-white ethnicity (RR 1.78 [1.04-3.04]), primary schooling or less (RR 2.16 [1.21-3.87]), being overweight (RR 4.34 [1.04-19.01]) or obese (RR 6.55 [1.57-27.37]), having public prenatal care (RR 2.16 [1.01-4.68]), planned pregnancies (RR 2.09 [1.15-3.78]), onset of infection in postpartum period (RR 6.00 [1.37-26.26]), chronic hypertension (RR 2.15 [1.37-4.10]), pre-existing diabetes (RR 3.20 [1.37-7.46]), asthma (RR 2.22 [1.14-4.34]), and anaemia (RR 3.15 [1.14-8.71]) were associated with higher risk for SARS. The availability of tests and maternal outcomes varied throughout the pandemic period of the study; the beginning was the most challenging period, with worse outcomes. Socially vulnerable, postpartum and previously ill women were more likely to present SARS related to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Maternal Death , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
8.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 760, 2021 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923523

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infection with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy can lead to a severe condition in the patient, which is challenging for obstetricians and anaesthesiologists. Upon severe COVID-19 and a lack of improvement after multidrug therapy and mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is introduced as the last option. Such treatment is critical in women with very preterm pregnancy when each additional day of the intrauterine stay is vital for the survival of the newborn. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of a 38-year-old woman at 27 weeks of gestation treated with multidrug therapy and ECMO. The woman was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with increasing fever, cough and dyspnoea. The course of the pregnancy was uncomplicated. She was otherwise healthy. At admission, she presented with severe dyspnoea, with oxygen saturation (SpO2) of 95% on passive oxygenation, heart rate of 145/min, and blood pressure of 145/90. After confirmation of SARS-CoV-2 infection, she received steroids, remdesivir and convalescent plasma therapy. The foetus was in good condition. No signs of an intrauterine infection were visible. Due to tachypnea of 40/min and SpO2 of 90%, the woman was intubated and mechanically ventilated. Due to circulatory failure, the prothrombotic activity of the coagulation system, further saturation worsening, and poor control of sedation, she was qualified for veno-venous ECMO. An elective caesarean section was performed at 29 weeks on ECMO treatment in the ICU. A preterm female newborn was delivered with an Apgar score of 7 and a birth weight of 1440 g. The newborn had no laboratory or clinical evidence of COVID-19. The placenta showed the following pathological changes: large subchorionic haematoma, maternal vascular malperfusion, marginal cord insertion, and chorangioma. CONCLUSIONS: This case presents the successful use of ECMO in a pregnant woman with acute respiratory distress syndrome in the course of severe COVID-19. Further research is required to explain the aetiology of placental disorders (e.g., maternal vascular malperfusion lesions or thrombotic influence of COVID-19). ECMO treatment in pregnant women remains challenging; thus, it should be used with caution. Long-term assessment may help to evaluate the safety of the ECMO procedure in pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Placenta/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cesarean Section , Female , Humans , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Trimester, Second , Treatment Outcome
9.
Turk J Med Sci ; 52(3): 554-564, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1918427

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Convalescent plasma (CP) might be an additional treatment modality in COVID-19. The aim of this study was to compare CP-related clinical characteristics and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with mild or moderate-severe COVID-19. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included 36 pregnant women (12 mild and 24 moderate-severe), who underwent CP therapy. The CP obtained from recently recovered donors was transfused to patients together with maximum supportive care and antiviral agents. The groups were then compared in respect of clinical characteristics, laboratory parameters, obstetric complications, and neonatal outcomes. RESULTS: Significant differences were determined between the groups in respect of systemic corticosteroids in COVID-19 treatment (41.7%, 87.5%, p = 0.004), oxygen (O2) support (0%, 91.7%, p < 0.001), chest imaging (41.7%, 58.3%, p = 0.02), intensive care unit admission (0%, 20.8%, p = 0.03) and length of hospitalization (5.5 versus 9.5 days, p < 0.001). The O2 saturation levels before and after administration of CP were significantly lower in the moderate-severe COVID-19 group (p < 0.05). The O2 therapy time before and after administration of CP and total O2 therapy time were significantly lower in the mild COVID-19 group (p < 0.05). Platelet, plateletcrit and lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in both the mild and moderate-severe COVID-19 groups after treatment compared to the pretreatment values (p < 0.05). DISCUSSION: Although data on the results of CP treatment in pregnant women are somewhat limited, it has been suggested that early CP treatment may be associated with improvements in laboratory and ventilatory parameters in pregnant women with mild and moderate-severe COVID-19. Nevertheless, there is a need for further, randomized controlled studies on this subject with the inclusion of greater numbers of patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , COVID-19/therapy , Immunization, Passive/methods , Pandemics , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 3024, 2022 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1890228

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women with COVID-19 require special attention and care, since the infection does not only affect the mother, but also her neonate and adversely affects pregnancy outcomes. The main goal of this retrospective cohort study is to investigate association between the maternal COVID-19 severity and risk of developing adverse neonatal outcomes. Patients were stratified into asymptomatic/mild and moderate to severe COVID-19. The following neonatal outcomes were assessed: gestational age at the time of delivery, birth weight, neonatal infection, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission. The average age of patients was 28.5 ± 1.4 years old and majority were multigravida (74.0%, n = 148). Of total 200 pregnant women with COVID-19, 26.5% (n = 53) had moderate/severe disease and presented with higher incidence of preterm delivery and low birth weight (88.7%, n = 47; p < 0.001). In addition, more than half of the newborns delivered by mothers with severe disease were infected by SARS-COV-2 (58.5%, n = 31) and majority were admitted to the NICU (95.0%, n = 52). Based on the multivariate logistic regression analysis, pregnant women with moderate to severe COVID-19 were at much higher risk of preterm delivery, lower birth weight, neonatal infection, as well as neonatal ICU admission (p < 0.001). In addition, multigravida women were at higher risk for preterm delivery and lower birth weight (p = 0.017 and p = 0.02; respectively). Appropriate protective measures and early detection of suspected COVID-19 should be addressed for more favorable obstetric outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infant, Low Birth Weight , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Patient Acuity , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Retrospective Studies
11.
BJOG ; 129(2): 221-231, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1840295

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this article was to describe SARS-CoV-2 infection among pregnant women during the wild-type and Alpha-variant periods in Italy. The secondary aim was to compare the impact of the virus variants on the severity of maternal and perinatal outcomes. DESIGN: National population-based prospective cohort study. SETTING: A total of 315 Italian maternity hospitals. SAMPLE: A cohort of 3306 women with SARS-CoV-2 infection confirmed within 7 days of hospital admission. METHODS: Cases were prospectively reported by trained clinicians for each participating maternity unit. Data were described by univariate and multivariate analyses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: COVID-19 pneumonia, ventilatory support, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mode of delivery, preterm birth, stillbirth, and maternal and neonatal mortality. RESULTS: We found that 64.3% of the cohort was asymptomatic, 12.8% developed COVID-19 pneumonia and 3.3% required ventilatory support and/or ICU admission. Maternal age of 30-34 years (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.09-1.87) and ≥35 years (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.23-2.13), citizenship of countries with high migration pressure (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.36-2.25), previous comorbidities (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.13-1.98) and obesity (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.29-2.27) were all associated with a higher occurrence of pneumonia. The preterm birth rate was 11.1%. In comparison with the pre-pandemic period, stillbirths and maternal and neonatal deaths remained stable. The need for ventilatory support and/or ICU admission among women with pneumonia increased during the Alpha-variant period compared with the wild-type period (OR 3.24, 95% CI 1.99-5.28). CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with a low risk of severe COVID-19 disease among pregnant women and with rare adverse perinatal outcomes. During the Alpha-variant period there was a significant increase of severe COVID-19 illness. Further research is needed to describe the impact of different SARS-CoV-2 viral strains on maternal and perinatal outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Maternity/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
12.
BJOG ; 129(2): 282-290, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831885

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess associations of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and pregnancy outcomes considering testing policy and test-positivity-to-delivery interval. DESIGN: Nationwide cohort study. SETTING: Sweden. POPULATION: From the Pregnancy-Register we identified 88 593 singleton births, 11 March 2020-31 January 2021, linked to data on SARS-CoV-2-positivity from the Public Health Agency, and information on neonatal care admission from the Neonatal Quality Register. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were estimated stratified by testing-policy and test-positivity-to-delivery interval. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Five-minute Apgar score, neonatal care admission, stillbirth and preterm birth. RESULTS: During pregnancy, SARS-CoV-2 test-positivity was 5.4% (794/14 665) under universal testing and 1.9% (1402/73 928) under non-universal testing. There were generally lower risks associated with SARS-CoV-2 under universal than non-universal testing. In women testing positive >10 days from delivery, generally no significant differences in risk were observed under either testing policy. Neonatal care admission was more common (15.3% versus 8.0%; aOR 2.24, 95% CI 1.62-3.11) in women testing positive ≤10 days before delivery under universal testing. There was no significant association with 5-minute Apgar score below 7 (1.0% versus 1.7%; aOR 0.64, 95% CI 0.24-1.72) or stillbirth (0.3% versus 0.4%; aOR 0.72, 95% CI 0.10-5.20). Compared with term births (2.1%), test-positivity was higher in medically indicated preterm birth (5.7%; aOR 2.70, 95% CI 1.60-4.58) but not significantly increased in spontaneous preterm birth (2.3%; aOR 1.12, 95% CI 0.62-2.02). CONCLUSIONS: Testing policy and timing of test-positivity impact associations between SARS-CoV-2-positivity and pregnancy outcomes. Under non-universal testing, women with complications near delivery are more likely to be tested than women without complications, thereby inflating any association with adverse pregnancy outcomes compared with findings under universal testing. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Testing policy and time from SARS-CoV-2 infection to delivery influence the association with pregnancy outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Apgar Score , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Prenatal Care/methods , Prenatal Care/standards , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Stillbirth/epidemiology , Sweden/epidemiology
13.
Pediatrics ; 150(1)2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793440

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infections are uncommon in newborn infants. This report describes possible in utero transmission of the B.1.1.7 (alpha) variant in a preterm infant born at 31 weeks' gestational age who presented with severe respiratory disease. The infant was treated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, antiviral medications, and corticosteroids and transitioned to noninvasive respiratory support on day 33. By day 63, she was off positive pressure support and breathing room air and she was discharged from the hospital on day 70. She demonstrated normal growth and development at a 6-month follow-up visit. Placental histopathology revealed placentitis characterized by loss of intervillous spaces resulting from fibrin deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration. Optimum management strategies for treating infants with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection have yet to be determined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Placenta , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Saudi Med J ; 43(4): 378-385, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789720

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between the hospitalization rates, symptoms, and laboratory parameters of pregnant women diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the gestational week, and determine their symptoms or laboratory parameters predictive of the need for possible admission in the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the symptoms, laboratory parameters, and treatment modalities of 175 pregnant women with COVID-19 who were admitted to a tertiary referral hospital between March 2020 and March 2021 and investigated their association with pregnancy trimesters. RESULTS: The COVID-19-related hospitalization rates in the first trimester was 24.1%, second trimesters was 36%, and third trimester was 57.3%. Cough and shortness of breath were significantly higher in the pregnant women in their third trimester than those in the first 2 trimesters (p=0.042 and p=0.026, respectively). No significant relationship was found between pregnancy trimesters and the need for ICU admission. Shortness of breath at the first admission increased the need for ICU by 6.95 times, and a 1 unit increase in C-reactive protein (CRP) level increased the risk of ICU by 1.003 times. CONCLUSION: The presence of respiratory symptoms and the need for hospitalization increased significantly with later trimesters in pregnant women with COVID-19. The presence of shortness of breath or high CRP level at the time of admission could predict the need for ICU admission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Dyspnea/etiology , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Trimesters , Pregnant Women , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 636, 2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779616

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few reports have presented an overall view of pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) across an entire country and throughout the entire gestation period. Furthermore, no such reports are available for Japan. We examined the clinical characteristics and outcomes of pregnant women with COVID­19 on a national scale in Japan. METHODS: A nationwide questionnaire-based survey for all 2,185 maternity services in Japan was conducted between July and August 2020. Information regarding maternal characteristics and epidemiological, clinical, treatment, and perinatal outcomes of pregnant women diagnosed with COVID-19 between 16 January and 30 June 2020 were collected. Main outcome measures were incidence of pregnant women with COVID-19 and infant infection, positive rate of the universal screening test for asymptomatic pregnant women, identification of infection route and rates of maternal death, and severe cases. RESULTS: Responses from 1,418 institutions were assessed (65% of all delivery institutions in Japan). Seventy-two pregnant women were reported to have been diagnosed with COVID-19. The positive rate of the universal screening test for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) among asymptomatic pregnant women was 0.03% (2/7428). The most common route of infection was familial (57%). Fifty-eight pregnant women with COVID-19 were symptomatic, of whom five (8.6%) had a severe infection and one died (a tourist). Severe respiratory symptoms, oxygen administration, and pneumonia were frequently reported in the third trimester and postpartum period compared with in early pregnancy (22.2% vs 2.5% [P = 0.03], 38.9% vs 7.5% [P = 0.01], and 50.0% vs 7.5% [P < 0.001], respectively). All pregnant women with COVID-19 underwent caesarean sections, regardless of symptoms. There were no SARS-CoV-2 transmissions to newborns. CONCLUSIONS: In Japan, the number of cases of COVID-19 infection in pregnant women is very low. Compared with early pregnancy, late pregnancy may be a risk factor for exacerbation of symptoms and familial transmission is the most common route of infection. The importance of infection prevention should be emphasised, especially in women in late pregnancy, their families, and any cohabitants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Adult , Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Incidence , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Japan/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
16.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 658, 2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whilst the impact of Covid-19 infection in pregnant women has been examined, there is a scarcity of data on pregnant women in the Middle East. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of Covid-19 infection on pregnant women in the United Arab Emirates population. METHODS: A case-control study was carried out to compare the clinical course and outcome of pregnancy in 79 pregnant women with Covid-19 and 85 non-pregnant women with Covid-19 admitted to Latifa Hospital in Dubai between March and June 2020. RESULTS: Although Pregnant women presented with fewer symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat, and shortness of breath compared to non-pregnant women; yet they ran a much more severe course of illness. On admission, 12/79 (15.2%) Vs 2/85 (2.4%) had a chest radiograph score [on a scale 1-6] of ≥3 (p-value = 0.0039). On discharge, 6/79 (7.6%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) had a score ≥3 (p-value = 0.0438). They also had much higher levels of laboratory indicators of severity with values above reference ranges for C-Reactive Protein [(28 (38.3%) Vs 13 (17.6%)] with p < 0.004; and for D-dimer [32 (50.8%) Vs 3(6%)]; with p < 0.001. They required more ICU admissions: 10/79 (12.6%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) with p=0.0036; and suffered more complications: 9/79 (11.4%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) with p=0.0066; of Covid-19 infection, particularly in late pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women presented with fewer Covid-19 symptoms but ran a much more severe course of illness compared to non-pregnant women with the disease. They had worse chest radiograph scores and much higher levels of laboratory indicators of disease severity. They had more ICU admissions and suffered more complications of Covid-19 infection, such as risk for miscarriage and preterm deliveries. Pregnancy with Covid-19 infection, could, therefore, be categorised as high-risk pregnancy and requires management by an obstetric and medical multidisciplinary team.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Radiography, Thoracic , Symptom Assessment , Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , Abortion, Spontaneous/etiology , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Case-Control Studies , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Premature Birth/etiology , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Radiography, Thoracic/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
17.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264901, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742010

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, the possible development of serious illness, and the possibility of severe obstetric outcomes highlight the importance of addressing SARS-CoV-2 infection in obstetric management. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study of pregnant women assisted in a high-risk maternity hospital in Brazil in 2020. All patients admitted for delivery or miscarriage care were tested for SARS-CoV-2 using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for immunoglobulin (I)gM, and/or IgG by immunochromatography. Clinical aspects and obstetric outcomes were analyzed. A total of 265 pregnant women were included in the study. There were 38 (14.4%) PCR positive cases during pregnancy, 12 (31.6%) on admission screening, and 71(27.2%) patients were IgM- and/or IgG-positive. Among the participants, 86 (32.4%) had at least one positive test during pregnancy. SARS-CoV-2 positive patients had greater contact with known positive patients (p = 0.005). The most frequently reported symptoms were runny nose, cough, loss of smell and taste, headache, and fever. There was also a 35% rate of asymptomatic infections and a 4.6% rate of severe or critical infections. Patients exposed or infected with SARS-CoV-2 had a higher incidence of preterm delivery, cesarean section, need for resuscitation in the delivery room, Apgar score <7 at 5 min, admission to the neonatal intensive care unit, and jaundice. Newborns with at least one positive test had a significantly greater need for phototherapy after delivery (p = 0.05). The results showed a high rate of positive tests among newborns (37.5%), which seems to be compatible with both neonatal and perinatal infection. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to further investigate SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy, including the clinical course and the possibility of adverse outcomes with impact on maternal and fetal health, regardless of the development of symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Maternity , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome , Prenatal Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Asymptomatic Infections/therapy , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy
19.
J Med Virol ; 94(3): 1074-1084, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718372

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to share the comprehensive experience of a tertiary pandemic center on pregnant women with COVID-19 and to compare clinical outcomes between pregnancy trimesters. The present prospective cohort study consisted of pregnant women with COVID-19 who were followed up at Ankara City Hospital between March 11, 2020 and February 20, 2021. Clinical characteristics and perinatal outcomes were compared between the pregnancy trimesters. A total of 1416 pregnant women (1400 singletons and 16 twins) with COVID-19 were evaluated. Twenty-six (1.8%) patients were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and maternal mortality was observed in six (0.4%) cases. Pregnancy complications were present in 227 (16.1%) cases and preterm labor was the most common one (n = 42, 2.9%). There were 311, 433, and 672 patients in the first, second, and third trimesters of pregnancy, respectively. Rates of mild and severe/critic COVID-19 were highest in the first and second trimesters, respectively. The hospitalization rate was highest in the third trimester. Pregnancy complications, maternal mortality, and NICU admission rates were similar between the groups. The course of the disease and obstetric outcomes may be different among pregnancy trimesters. A worse course of the disease may be observed even in pregnant women without any coexisting health problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol ; 226(1): 16-24, 2022 02.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709844

ABSTRACT

Since the onset of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, the German Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics and the Society for Peri-/Neonatal Medicine have published and repeatedly updated recommendations for the management of SARS-CoV-2 positive pregnancies and neonates. As a continuation of existing recommendations, the current update addresses key issues related to the prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal care of pregnant women, women who have recently given birth, women who are breastfeeding with SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, and their unborn or newborn infants, based on publications through September 2021. Recommendations and opinions were carefully derived from currently available scientific data and subsequently adopted by expert consensus. This guideline - here available in the short version - is intended to be an aid to clinical decision making. Interpretation and therapeutic responsibility remain with the supervising local medical team, whose decisions should be supported by these recommendations. Adjustments may be necessary due to the rapid dynamics of new evidence. The recommendations are supported by the endorsement of the professional societies: German Society for Perinatal Medicine (DGPM), German Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (DGGG), German Society for Prenatal and Obstetric Medicine (DGPGM), German Society for Pediatric Infectiology (DGPI), Society for Neonatology and Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine (GNPI).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Child , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Parturition , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
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