Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 202
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol ; 60(6): 1043-1046, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525965

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Aim of this study is to evaluate the prognosis of pregnant women having SARS-CoV-2 infection and investigate whether there was a difference in perinatal outcomes between pregnant women who had SARS-CoV-2 infection and those who did not. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective observational study was conducted with 116 singleton pregnancies. Cases enrolling in the study were divided into two groups. While those in the first group had a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection (n = 46) the second group consisted of healthy pregnant women (n = 70). RESULTS: Emergency Cesarean section was performed on three SARS-CoV-2 infected pregnancies (30, 33 and 34 gestational weeks). Intensive care unit admission was required for all three cases after delivery and two of them died. Among the pregnancies that had an infection in the third trimester, 71.4% (n = 20) of them had delivery in 14 days after diagnosis and 17.4% (n = 8) of their newborns were followed up at newborn intensive care unit. Overall, only one newborn had a positive swab test result for SARS-CoV-2. There was no statistically significant difference between groups regarding their delivery week (37.02 ± 5.85 vs 38.5 ± 2.33). Similarly, there was no significant difference between groups, concerning mean age, parity, and birth weight (P = 0.707, P = 0.092, P = 0.334; P < 0.05). Furthermore, the difference between SARS-CoV-2 infected pregnancies that were followed up as inpatient or outpatient with respect to the delivery week and birth weight was not significant (p > 0.05). Also, APGAR 5 scores of hospitalized women (9.3 ± 1.1) were found to be lower than the outpatient group (9.8 ± 0.8) (P = 0.043; p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: No significant difference was detected between groups in terms of the delivery week, birth weight, and APGAR scores. The inpatient group was found to have lower APGAR 5 scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Delivery, Obstetric , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality , Pregnant Women/psychology , Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , Birth Weight , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Med Sci ; 18(3): 763-767, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524479

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and is an emerging disease. There has been a rapid increase in cases and deaths since it was identified in Wuhan, China, in early December 2019, with over 4,000,000 cases of COVID-19 including at least 250,000 deaths worldwide as of May 2020. However, limited data about the clinical characteristics of pregnant women with COVID-19 have been reported. Given the maternal physiologic and immune function changes during pregnancy, pregnant women may be at a higher risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 and developing more complicated clinical events. Information on severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) may provide insights into the effects of COVID-19's during pregnancy. Even though SARS and MERS have been associated with miscarriage, intrauterine death, fetal growth restriction and high case fatality rates, the clinical course of COVID-19 pneumonia in pregnant women has been reported to be similar to that in non-pregnant women. In addition, pregnant women do not appear to be at a higher risk of catching COVID-19 or suffering from more severe disease than other adults of similar age. Moreover, there is currently no evidence that the virus can be transmitted to the fetus during pregnancy or during childbirth. Babies and young children are also known to only experience mild forms of COVID-19. The aims of this systematic review were to summarize the possible symptoms, treatments, and pregnancy outcomes of women infected with COVID-19 during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Maternal Exposure , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Severity of Illness Index
3.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 760, 2021 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511731

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infection with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy can lead to a severe condition in the patient, which is challenging for obstetricians and anaesthesiologists. Upon severe COVID-19 and a lack of improvement after multidrug therapy and mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is introduced as the last option. Such treatment is critical in women with very preterm pregnancy when each additional day of the intrauterine stay is vital for the survival of the newborn. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of a 38-year-old woman at 27 weeks of gestation treated with multidrug therapy and ECMO. The woman was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with increasing fever, cough and dyspnoea. The course of the pregnancy was uncomplicated. She was otherwise healthy. At admission, she presented with severe dyspnoea, with oxygen saturation (SpO2) of 95% on passive oxygenation, heart rate of 145/min, and blood pressure of 145/90. After confirmation of SARS-CoV-2 infection, she received steroids, remdesivir and convalescent plasma therapy. The foetus was in good condition. No signs of an intrauterine infection were visible. Due to tachypnea of 40/min and SpO2 of 90%, the woman was intubated and mechanically ventilated. Due to circulatory failure, the prothrombotic activity of the coagulation system, further saturation worsening, and poor control of sedation, she was qualified for veno-venous ECMO. An elective caesarean section was performed at 29 weeks on ECMO treatment in the ICU. A preterm female newborn was delivered with an Apgar score of 7 and a birth weight of 1440 g. The newborn had no laboratory or clinical evidence of COVID-19. The placenta showed the following pathological changes: large subchorionic haematoma, maternal vascular malperfusion, marginal cord insertion, and chorangioma. CONCLUSIONS: This case presents the successful use of ECMO in a pregnant woman with acute respiratory distress syndrome in the course of severe COVID-19. Further research is required to explain the aetiology of placental disorders (e.g., maternal vascular malperfusion lesions or thrombotic influence of COVID-19). ECMO treatment in pregnant women remains challenging; thus, it should be used with caution. Long-term assessment may help to evaluate the safety of the ECMO procedure in pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Placenta/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cesarean Section , Female , Humans , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Trimester, Second , Treatment Outcome
5.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258754, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477539

ABSTRACT

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been successfully applied to patients with COVID-19 to prevent endotracheal intubation. However, experience of CPAP application in pregnant women with acute respiratory failure (ARF) due to SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia is scarce. This study aimed to describe the natural history and outcome of ARF in a cohort of pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, focusing on the feasibility of helmet CPAP (h-CPAP) application and the variables related to ARF worsening. A retrospective, observational study enrolling 41 consecutive pregnant women hospitalised for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in a tertiary care center between March 2020 and March 2021. h-CPAP was applied if arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen ratio (PaO2/FiO2) was inferior to 200 and/or patients had respiratory distress despite adequate oxygen supplementation. Characteristics of patients requiring h-CPAP vs those in room air or oxygen only were compared. Twenty-seven (66%) patients showed hypoxemic ARF requiring oxygen supplementation and h-CPAP was needed in 10 cases (24%). PaO2/FiO2 was significantly improved during h-CPAP application. The device was well-tolerated in all cases with no adverse events. Higher serum C reactive protein and more extensive (≥3 lobes) involvement at chest X-ray upon admission were observed in the h-CPAP group. Assessment of temporal distribution of cases showed a substantially increased rate of CPAP requirement during the third pandemic wave (January-March 2021). In conclusion, h-CPAP was feasible, safe, well-tolerated and improved oxygenation in pregnant women with moderate-to-severe ARF due to SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. Moderate-to-severe ARF was more frequently observed during the third pandemic wave.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Respiratory Insufficiency , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Tertiary Care Centers , Acute Disease , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Oxygen/blood , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Protein C/metabolism , Respiratory Insufficiency/blood , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies
6.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 658, 2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440917

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whilst the impact of Covid-19 infection in pregnant women has been examined, there is a scarcity of data on pregnant women in the Middle East. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of Covid-19 infection on pregnant women in the United Arab Emirates population. METHODS: A case-control study was carried out to compare the clinical course and outcome of pregnancy in 79 pregnant women with Covid-19 and 85 non-pregnant women with Covid-19 admitted to Latifa Hospital in Dubai between March and June 2020. RESULTS: Although Pregnant women presented with fewer symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat, and shortness of breath compared to non-pregnant women; yet they ran a much more severe course of illness. On admission, 12/79 (15.2%) Vs 2/85 (2.4%) had a chest radiograph score [on a scale 1-6] of ≥3 (p-value = 0.0039). On discharge, 6/79 (7.6%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) had a score ≥3 (p-value = 0.0438). They also had much higher levels of laboratory indicators of severity with values above reference ranges for C-Reactive Protein [(28 (38.3%) Vs 13 (17.6%)] with p < 0.004; and for D-dimer [32 (50.8%) Vs 3(6%)]; with p < 0.001. They required more ICU admissions: 10/79 (12.6%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) with p=0.0036; and suffered more complications: 9/79 (11.4%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) with p=0.0066; of Covid-19 infection, particularly in late pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women presented with fewer Covid-19 symptoms but ran a much more severe course of illness compared to non-pregnant women with the disease. They had worse chest radiograph scores and much higher levels of laboratory indicators of disease severity. They had more ICU admissions and suffered more complications of Covid-19 infection, such as risk for miscarriage and preterm deliveries. Pregnancy with Covid-19 infection, could, therefore, be categorised as high-risk pregnancy and requires management by an obstetric and medical multidisciplinary team.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Radiography, Thoracic , Symptom Assessment , Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , Abortion, Spontaneous/etiology , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Case-Control Studies , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Premature Birth/etiology , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Radiography, Thoracic/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
8.
Placenta ; 115: 78-86, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415712

ABSTRACT

The risk of potential vertical transmission in SARS-CoV-2 infected pregnant women is currently a topic of debate. To explore the correlation between the two, we searched PubMed, Embase®, and Web of Science for studies on vertical transmission of COVID-19. The quality of the studies was evaluated by the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Detailed information of each included case including methods of delivery, protection measures for mothers and neonates at birth, types of specimens, inspection time, results of testing and feeding patterns was collected to assess the possibility of vertical transmission. The results showed that of the 390 neonates reported in 36 studies, 23 were infected with SARS-CoV-2 by potential vertical transmission. From the perspective of virology and pathology, vertical transmission of SARS-CoV-2 was possible via uterus or breastmilk. Some reported potential vertically transmitted neonates could be attributed to horizontal transmission. It is extremely vital to fully elucidate the potential routes of transmission of SARS-CoV-2, implicating clinical practice and nursing to reduce the risk of not only horizontal transmission but also vertical transmission, thus protecting neonates from COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Biomedical Research/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
9.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 636, 2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few reports have presented an overall view of pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) across an entire country and throughout the entire gestation period. Furthermore, no such reports are available for Japan. We examined the clinical characteristics and outcomes of pregnant women with COVID­19 on a national scale in Japan. METHODS: A nationwide questionnaire-based survey for all 2,185 maternity services in Japan was conducted between July and August 2020. Information regarding maternal characteristics and epidemiological, clinical, treatment, and perinatal outcomes of pregnant women diagnosed with COVID-19 between 16 January and 30 June 2020 were collected. Main outcome measures were incidence of pregnant women with COVID-19 and infant infection, positive rate of the universal screening test for asymptomatic pregnant women, identification of infection route and rates of maternal death, and severe cases. RESULTS: Responses from 1,418 institutions were assessed (65% of all delivery institutions in Japan). Seventy-two pregnant women were reported to have been diagnosed with COVID-19. The positive rate of the universal screening test for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) among asymptomatic pregnant women was 0.03% (2/7428). The most common route of infection was familial (57%). Fifty-eight pregnant women with COVID-19 were symptomatic, of whom five (8.6%) had a severe infection and one died (a tourist). Severe respiratory symptoms, oxygen administration, and pneumonia were frequently reported in the third trimester and postpartum period compared with in early pregnancy (22.2% vs 2.5% [P = 0.03], 38.9% vs 7.5% [P = 0.01], and 50.0% vs 7.5% [P < 0.001], respectively). All pregnant women with COVID-19 underwent caesarean sections, regardless of symptoms. There were no SARS-CoV-2 transmissions to newborns. CONCLUSIONS: In Japan, the number of cases of COVID-19 infection in pregnant women is very low. Compared with early pregnancy, late pregnancy may be a risk factor for exacerbation of symptoms and familial transmission is the most common route of infection. The importance of infection prevention should be emphasised, especially in women in late pregnancy, their families, and any cohabitants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Adult , Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Incidence , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Japan/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
10.
Int J Obstet Anesth ; 48: 103212, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401518

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 in pregnancy increases the risk of caesarean section. We present two cases of late gestation pregnant women with severe COVID-19. Both were successfully treated with mechanical ventilation without termination of pregnancy and, following recovery from COVID-19, had vaginal deliveries at term. These two cases demonstrate the possibility of treating pregnant women with severe COVID-19 with mechanical ventilation in the late second and early third trimesters without them having a pre-term delivery. With a multidisciplinary approach, such management could avoid the maternal risks of surgery during a severe infection and, at the same time, enable term birth with a lower risk of neonatal complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Live Birth , Positive-Pressure Respiration/methods , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Adult , Analgesics/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Hypnotics and Sedatives/therapeutic use , Neuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents/therapeutic use , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Outcome , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
12.
Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets ; 21(8): 1392-1405, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389051

ABSTRACT

The complications of the SARS-CoV-2 infection and its COVID-19 disease on mothers and their offspring are less known. This review aimed to determine the transmission, severity, and complications of SARS- CoV-2 infection during pregnancy. This review showed the influence of COVID-19 disease on neonatal neurogenesis. Owing medicines that were reported for the treatment of COVID-19 disease, this review suggested some control strategies like treatments (medicinal plants, antiviral therapy, cellular therapy, and immunotherapy), nutrition uptake, prevention, and recommendations. This overview showed that severe infection of SARS-CoV-2 during the early stage of pregnancy might increase the risk of stress, panic, and anxiety. This disorder can disturb the maternal immune system, and thus causing a neurodevelopmental disturbance. This hypothesis may be depending on the severity and intensity of the SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy. However, vertical transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from dams to their fetuses is absent until now. During this global pandemic disease, maintaining safety during pregnancy, vaginal delivery, and breastfeeding may play a vital role in a healthy life for the offspring. Thus, international, and national organizations should be continuing for perinatal management, particularly during the next pandemic or disaster time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Female , Humans , Immunotherapy/methods , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
13.
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand ; 99(7): 819-822, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388175

ABSTRACT

The Public Health Agency of Sweden has analyzed how many pregnant and postpartum women with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection have been treated in intensive care units (ICU) in Sweden between 19 March and 20 April 2020 compared with non-pregnant women of similar age. Cases were identified in a special reporting module within the Swedish Intensive Care Registry (SIR). Fifty-three women aged 20-45 years with SARS-CoV-2 were reported in SIR, and 13 of these women were either pregnant or postpartum (<1 week). The results indicate that the risk of being admitted to ICU may be higher in pregnant and postpartum women with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 in Sweden, compared with non-pregnant women of similar age.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Puerperal Infection , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Puerperal Infection/epidemiology , Puerperal Infection/physiopathology , Puerperal Infection/therapy , Puerperal Infection/virology , Registries/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sweden/epidemiology
15.
16.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(38): 1355-1359, 2020 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389855

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women might be at increased risk for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), possibly related to changes in their immune system and respiratory physiology* (1). Further, adverse birth outcomes, such as preterm delivery and stillbirth, might be more common among pregnant women infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 (2,3). Information about SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy is rapidly growing; however, data on reasons for hospital admission, pregnancy-specific characteristics, and birth outcomes among pregnant women hospitalized with SARS-CoV-2 infections are limited. During March 1-May 30, 2020, as part of Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD)† surveillance of COVID-19 hospitalizations, 105 hospitalized pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection were identified, including 62 (59%) hospitalized for obstetric reasons (i.e., labor and delivery or another pregnancy-related indication) and 43 (41%) hospitalized for COVID-19 illness without an obstetric reason. Overall, 50 (81%) of 62 pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection who were admitted for obstetric reasons were asymptomatic. Among 43 pregnant women hospitalized for COVID-19, 13 (30%) required intensive care unit (ICU) admission, six (14%) required mechanical ventilation, and one died from COVID-19. Prepregnancy obesity was more common (44%) among pregnant women hospitalized for COVID-19 than that among asymptomatic pregnant women hospitalized for obstetric reasons (31%). Likewise, the rate of gestational diabetes (26%) among pregnant women hospitalized for COVID-19 was higher than it was among women hospitalized for obstetric reasons (8%). Preterm delivery occurred in 15% of pregnancies among 93 women who delivered, and stillbirths (fetal death at ≥20 weeks' gestation) occurred in 3%. Antenatal counseling emphasizing preventive measures (e.g., use of masks, frequent hand washing, and social distancing) might help prevent COVID-19 among pregnant women,§ especially those with prepregnancy obesity and gestational diabetes, which might reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Health Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
17.
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand ; 100(11): 2097-2110, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381102

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Assessing the risk factors for and consequences of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) during pregnancy is essential to guide clinical care. Previous studies on SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy have been among hospitalized patients, which may have exaggerated risk estimates of severe outcomes because all cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the pregnant population were not included. The objectives of this study were to identify risk factors for and outcomes after SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy independent of severity of infection in a universally tested population, and to identify risk factors for and outcomes after severe infection requiring hospital admission. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a prospective population-based cohort study in Denmark using data from the Danish National Patient Register and Danish Microbiology Database and prospectively registered data from medical records. We included all pregnancies between March 1 and October 31, 2020 and compared women with a positive SARS-CoV-2 test during pregnancy to non-infected pregnant women. Cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy were both identified prospectively and through register linkage to ensure that all cases were identified and that cases were pregnant during infection. Main outcome measures were pregnancy, delivery, maternal, and neonatal outcomes. Severe infection was defined as hospital admission due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms. RESULTS: Among 82 682 pregnancies, 418 women had SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy, corresponding to an incidence of 5.1 per 1000 pregnancies, 23 (5.5%) of which required hospital admission due to COVID-19. Risk factors for infection were asthma (odds ratio [OR] 2.19, 95% CI 1.41-3.41) and being foreign born (OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.70-2.64). Risk factors for hospital admission due to COVID-19 included obesity (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.00-7.51), smoking (OR 4.69, 95% CI 1.58-13.90), infection after gestational age (GA) 22 weeks (GA 22-27 weeks: OR 3.77, 95% CI 1.16-12.29; GA 28-36 weeks: OR 4.76, 95% CI 1.60-14.12), and having asthma (OR 4.53, 95% CI 1.39-14.79). We found no difference in any obstetrical or neonatal outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Only 1 in 20 women with SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy required admission to hospital due to COVID-19. Risk factors for admission comprised obesity, smoking, asthma, and infection after GA 22 weeks. Severe adverse outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy were rare.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Denmark , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Risk Factors , Young Adult
18.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 587, 2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371956

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused ongoing challenges in health services worldwide. Despite the growing body of literature on COVID-19, reports on perinatal care in COVID-19 cases are limited. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a case of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a 36-year-old G5/P2 pregnant woman with morbid obesity, confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection, and fulminant respiratory failure. At 28+ 1 gestational weeks, the patient delivered an uninfected newborn. Using ImmunoCAP ISAC® technology, we found no immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies, suggesting that no mother-to-child viral transmission occurred during pregnancy or delivery. The maternal respiratory state improved rapidly after delivery; both maternal and neonatal outcomes were encouraging given the early gestational age and fulminant course of respiratory failure in our patient. CONCLUSIONS: The management of ARDS in pregnant women with COVID-19 is complex and requires an individualized, multidisciplinary approach, while considering maternal and fetal outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cesarean Section/methods , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Fetal Monitoring/methods , Gestational Age , Humans , Obesity, Morbid/diagnosis , Obesity, Morbid/physiopathology , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Perinatal Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/etiology , Premature Birth/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome
19.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2120456, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351178

ABSTRACT

Importance: Prior studies on COVID-19 and pregnancy have reported higher rates of cesarean delivery and preterm birth and increased morbidity and mortality. Additional data encompassing a longer time period are needed. Objective: To examine characteristics and outcomes of a large US cohort of women who underwent childbirth with vs without COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study compared characteristics and outcomes of women (age ≥18 years) who underwent childbirth with vs without COVID-19 between March 1, 2020, and February 28, 2021, at 499 US academic medical centers or community affiliates. Follow-up was limited to in-hospital course and discharge destination. Childbirth was defined by clinical classification software procedural codes of 134-137. A diagnosis of COVID-19 was identified using International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis of U07.1. Data were analyzed from April 1 to April 30, 2021. Exposures: The presence of a COVID-19 diagnosis using ICD-10. Main Outcomes and Measures: Analyses compared demographic characteristics, gestational age, and comorbidities. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included hospital length of stay, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mechanical ventilation, and discharge status. Continuous variables were analyzed using t test, and categorical variables were analyzed using χ2. Results: Among 869 079 women, 18 715 (2.2%) had COVID-19, and 850 364 (97.8%) did not. Most women were aged 18 to 30 years (11 550 women with COVID-19 [61.7%]; 447 534 women without COVID-19 [52.6%]) and were White (8060 White women [43.1%] in the COVID-19 cohort; 499 501 White women (58.7%) in the non-COVID-19 cohort). There was no significant increase in cesarean delivery among women with COVID-19 (6088 women [32.5%] vs 273 810 women [32.3%]; P = .57). Women with COVID-19 were more likely to have preterm birth (3072 women [16.4%] vs 97 967 women [11.5%]; P < .001). Women giving birth with COVID-19, compared with women without COVID-19, had significantly higher rates of ICU admission (977 women [5.2%] vs 7943 women [0.9%]; odds ratio [OR], 5.84 [95% CI, 5.46-6.25]; P < .001), respiratory intubation and mechanical ventilation (275 women [1.5%] vs 884 women [0.1%]; OR, 14.33 [95% CI, 12.50-16.42]; P < .001), and in-hospital mortality (24 women [0.1%] vs 71 [<0.01%]; OR, 15.38 [95% CI, 9.68-24.43]; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: This retrospective cohort study found that women with COVID-19 giving birth had higher rates of mortality, intubation, ICU admission, and preterm birth than women without COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Databases, Factual , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(30): e26798, 2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345781

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) may develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). There have been few reports of postpartum woman with ARDS secondary to COVID-19 who required respiratory support using veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We present the case of a 31-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital at 35 weeks gestation with ARDS secondary to COVID-19 and required ECMO during the postpartum period. PATIENT CONCERNS: The patient had obvious dyspnea, accompanied by chills and fever. Her dyspnea worsened and her arterial oxygen saturation decreased rapidly. DIAGNOSIS: ARDS secondary to COVID-19. INTERVENTIONS: Emergency bedside cesarean section. Medications included immunotherapy (thymosin α 1), antivirals (lopinavir/ritonavir and ribavirin), antibiotics (imipenem-cilastatin sodium and vancomycin), and methylprednisolone. Ventilatory support was provided using invasive mechanical ventilation. This was replaced by venous-venous ECMO 5 days postpartum. ECMO management focused on blood volume control, coagulation function adjustment, and airway management. OUTCOMES: The patient was successfully weaned for ECMO and the ventilator and made a good recovery. CONCLUSION: Special care, including blood volume control, coagulation function adjustment, and airway management, should be provided to postpartum patients with ARDS secondary to COVID-19 who require ECMO support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , Cesarean Section , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...