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1.
Obstet Gynecol ; 138(4): 542-551, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621687

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic altered risk of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes and whether there were differences by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection status among pregnant women. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study using Epic's Cosmos research platform, women who delivered during the pandemic (March-December 2020) were compared with those who delivered prepandemic (matched months 2017-2019). Within the pandemic epoch, those who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection were compared with those with negative test results or no SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis. Comparisons were performed using standardized differences, with a value greater than 0.1 indicating meaningful differences between groups. RESULTS: Among 838,489 women (225,225 who delivered during the pandemic), baseline characteristics were similar between epochs. There were no significant differences in adverse pregnancy outcomes between epochs (standardized difference<0.10). In the pandemic epoch, 108,067 (48.0%) women had SARS-CoV-2 testing available; of those, 7,432 (6.9%) had positive test results. Compared with women classified as negative for SARS-CoV-2 infection, those who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection were less likely to be non-Hispanic White or Asian or to reside in the Midwest and more likely to be Hispanic, have public insurance, be obese, and reside in the South or in high social vulnerability ZIP codes. There were no significant differences in the frequency of preterm birth (8.5% vs 7.6%, standardized difference=0.032), stillbirth (0.4% vs 0.4%, standardized difference=-0.002), small for gestational age (6.4% vs 6.5%, standardized difference=-0.002), large for gestational age (7.7% vs 7.7%, standardized difference=-0.001), hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (16.3% vs 15.8%, standardized difference=0.014), placental abruption (0.5% vs 0.4%, standardized difference=0.007), cesarean birth (31.2% vs 29.4%, standardized difference=0.039), or postpartum hemorrhage (3.4% vs 3.1%, standardized difference=0.019) between those who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection and those classified as testing negative. CONCLUSION: In a geographically diverse U.S. cohort, the frequency of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes did not differ between those delivering before compared with during the pandemic, nor between those classified as positive compared with negative for SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Prenatal Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
2.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(3): 245-250, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604118

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In patients with COVID-19, olfactory dysfunction and anosmia have been reported, which in pregnant women occur in up to 24.2 %. OBJECTIVE: To know the frequency at which pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection have olfactory dysfunction. METHODS: Age, gestational age, temperature, presence of nasal constipation or rhinorrhea, myalgia, headache, cough or chest pain were asked. Whether patients perceived and identified the scent of grape juice, coffee powder and menthol was evaluated. Central tendency and dispersion measures, frequencies and percentages were used. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were calculated. Mann-Whitney's U-test and contrast of proportions were used for comparisons between groups. RESULTS: There was a higher proportion of women with cough, headache, dyspnea, myalgia, odynophagia, rhinorrhea, chest pain, and anosmia in SARS-CoV-2-positive women. In patients without COVID-19, 88.9 % detected each one of the scents; only 31.8 % of the positive group detected grapes scent, 47.7 % coffee and 59.1 % menthol, which had the highest percentages of sensitivity (40 %), specificity (21 %), positive predictive value (59 %) and negative predictive value (11 %). CONCLUSION: Olfactory dysfunction occurs in a significant percentage of pregnant women with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anosmia/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Olfaction Disorders/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Anosmia/virology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Olfaction Disorders/virology , Predictive Value of Tests , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Prospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
4.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 14, 2022 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604590

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is predominately known as a respiratory disease associated with pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. However, extra-pulmonary complications of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are increasingly being recognized. In this regard, some studies implied the hemostatic and vascular involvements in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a case of spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ICH) in a pregnant patient with COVID-19 and history of cesarean section a week before the occurrence of ICH. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy with acceptable outcome. Hemorrhagic events, including ICH, may happen during COVID-19 infection with several possible mechanisms. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 patients, especially high-risk groups, are at a risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Therefore, close follow-up must be maintained and hemorrhagic events must be kept in mind in these cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Cerebral Hemorrhage/pathology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/surgery , Craniotomy , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/surgery , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Treatment Outcome
5.
Mol Med ; 27(1): 162, 2021 12 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582120

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel type b coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. With over 224 million confirmed infections with this virus and more than 4.6 million people dead because of it, it is critically important to define the immunological processes occurring in the human response to this virus and pathogenetic mechanisms of its deadly manifestation. This perspective focuses on the contribution of the recently discovered interaction of SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein with neuropilin 1 (NRP1) receptor, NRP1 as a virus entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2, its role in different physiologic and pathologic conditions, and the potential to target the Spike-NRP1 interaction to combat virus infectivity and severe disease manifestations.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Neuropilin-1/chemistry , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Infant , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Neuropilin-1/immunology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
6.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580422

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant women can lead to placental damage and transplacental infection transfer, and intrauterine fetal demise is an unpredictable event. CASE STUDY: A 32-year-old patient in her 38th week of pregnancy reported loss of fetal movements. She overcame mild COVID-19 with positive PCR test 22 days before. A histology of the placenta showed deposition of intervillous fibrinoid, lympho-histiocytic infiltration, scant neutrophils, clumping of villi, and extant infarctions. Immunohistochemistry identified focal SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid and spike protein in the syncytiotrophoblast and isolated in situ hybridization of the virus' RNA. Low ACE2 and TMPRSS2 contrasted with strong basigin/CD147 and PDL-1 positivity in the trophoblast. An autopsy of the fetus showed no morphological abnormalities except for lung interstitial infiltrate, with prevalent CD8-positive T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization proved the presence of countless dispersed SARS-CoV-2-infected epithelial and endothelial cells in the lung tissue. The potential virus-receptor protein ACE2, TMPRSS2, and CD147 expression was too low to be detected. CONCLUSION: Over three weeks' persistence of trophoblast viral infection lead to extensive intervillous fibrinoid depositions and placental infarctions. High CD147 expression might serve as the dominant receptor for the virus, and PDL-1 could limit maternal immunity in placental tissue virus clearance. The presented case indicates that the SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced changes in the placenta lead to ischemia and consecutive demise of the fetus. The infection of the fetus was without significant impact on its death. This rare complication of pregnancy can appear independently to the severity of COVID-19's clinical course in the pregnant mother.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Placenta/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Stillbirth , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , B-Lymphocytes , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/diagnosis , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Female , Fetus/pathology , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Placenta/virology , Placenta Diseases/pathology , Placenta Diseases/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Trophoblasts
7.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(5): 1-16, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574630

ABSTRACT

In a large-scale study, 128176 non-pregnant patients (228 studies) and 10000 pregnant patients (121 studies) confirmed COVID-19 cases included in this Meta-Analysis. The mean (confidence interval [CI]) of age and gestational age of admission (GA) in pregnant women was 33 (28-37) years old and 36 (34-37) weeks, respectively. Pregnant women show the same manifestations of COVID-19 as non-pregnant adult patients. Fever (pregnant: 75.5%; non-pregnant: 74%) and cough (pregnant: 48.5%; non-pregnant: 53.5%) are the most common symptoms in both groups followed by myalgia (26.5%) and chill (25%) in pregnant and dysgeusia (27%) and fatigue (26.5%) in non-pregnant patients. Pregnant women are less probable to show cough (odds ratio [OR] 0.7; 95% CI 0.67-0.75), fatigue (OR: 0.58; CI: 0.54-0.61), sore throat (OR: 0.66; CI: 0.61-0.7), headache (OR: 0.55; CI: 0.55-0.58) and diarrhea (OR: 0.46; CI: 0.4-0.51) than non-pregnant adult patients. The most common imaging found in pregnant women is ground-glass opacity (57%) and in non-pregnant patients is consolidation (76%). Pregnant women have higher proportion of leukocytosis (27% vs. 14%), thrombocytopenia (18% vs. 12.5%) and have lower proportion of raised C-reactive protein (52% vs. 81%) compared with non-pregnant patients. Leucopenia and lymphopenia are almost the same in both groups. The most common comorbidity in pregnant patients is diabetes (18%) and in non-pregnant patients is hypertension (21%). Case fatality rate (CFR) of non-pregnant hospitalized patients is 6.4% (4.4-8.5), and mortality due to all-cause for pregnant patients is 11.3% (9.6-13.3). Regarding the complications of pregnancy, postpartum hemorrhage (54.5% [7-94]), caesarean delivery (48% [42-54]), preterm labor (25% [4-74]) and preterm birth (21% [12-34]) are in turn the most prevalent complications. Comparing the pregnancy outcomes show that caesarean delivery (OR: 3; CI: 2-5), low birth weight (LBW) (OR: 9; CI: 2.4-30) and preterm birth (OR: 2.5; CI: 1.5-3.5) are more probable in pregnant woman with COVID-19 than pregnant women without COVID-19. The most prevalent neonatal complications are neonatal intensive care unit admission (43% [2-96]), fetal distress (30% [12-58]) and LBW (25% [16-37]). The rate of vertical transmission is 5.3% (1.3-16), and the rate of positive SARS-CoV-2 test for neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 is 8% (4-16). Overall, pregnant patients present with the similar clinical characteristics of COVID-19 when compared with the general population, but they may be more asymptomatic. Higher odds of caesarean delivery, LBW and preterm birth among pregnant patients with COVID-19 suggest a possible association between COVID-19 infection and pregnancy complications. Low risk of vertical transmission is present, and SARS-CoV-2 can be detected in all conception products, particularly placenta and breast milk. Interpretations of these results should be done cautiously due to the heterogeneity between studies; however, we believe our findings can guide the prenatal and postnatal considerations for COVID-19 pregnant patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnant Women , Premature Birth , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
8.
Infect Dis Now ; 51(5): 435-439, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574384

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the world. Given the sharply increased infection rate, the number of pregnant women and children with COVID-19 is correspondingly on the rise. SARS-CoV-2 infection is transmitted through droplets; though hypothesized, other transmission routes have not been confirmed. As of now, it remains unclear whether and how SARS-CoV-2 can possibly be transmitted from the mother to the fetus. Method: This study examines the medical records of 30 neonates born to women with COVID-19, the objective being to provide documented information on maternal-child transmission and infant outcomes. Results: Out of the 30 newborns, 28 had negative PCR test results for SARS-CoV-2; among their mothers, fifteen had fever, nine had cough and twenty had delivered by cesarean section. The median birth term was 37wk2dy, and twenty of the neonates were male. Most of them were asymptomatic, except for the three who presented with shortness of breath. Two of them were intubated and both died, the first because of severe sepsis and the second due to severe hyaline membrane disease. As regards the two infected neonates, the first represents a probable case of congenital SARS-CoV-2 infection, which appears unlikely in the second case. The outcome for both of them was good, without any complications. Conclusion: Maternal-fetal transmission of the SARS- CoV-2 virus was not detected in the majority of the reported cases, although two of 30 neonates had positive qRT-PCR test results. Our study supports the hypothesis that though it seldom actually occurs, in utero SARS-CoV-2 vertical transmission is possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Mothers , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
9.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572671

ABSTRACT

Neonatal COVID-19 is rare and mainly results from postnatal transmission. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), however, can infect the placenta and compromise its function. We present two cases of decreased fetal movements and abnormal fetal heart rhythm 5 days after mild maternal COVID-19, requiring emergency caesarean section at 29 + 3 and 32 + 1 weeks of gestation, and leading to brain injury. Placental examination revealed extensive and multifocal chronic intervillositis, with intense cytoplasmic positivity for SARS-CoV-2 spike antibody and SARS-CoV-2 detection by RT-qPCR. Vertical transmission was confirmed in one case, and both neonates developed extensive cystic peri-ventricular leukomalacia.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adult , Brain Injuries/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cesarean Section , Female , Fetal Movement , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Leukomalacia, Periventricular/etiology , Leukomalacia, Periventricular/pathology , Placenta/pathology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
10.
S Afr Med J ; 111(12): 1174-1180, 2021 12 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561763

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant women living with HIV (PLHIV) has not been described previously. OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical presentation and outcomes of a cohort of women with high-risk pregnancies with confirmed COVID-19 to determine whether risk factors for disease severity and adverse outcomes of COVID-19 differed in pregnant women without HIV compared with PLHIV. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled pregnant women with COVID-19 attending the high-risk obstetric service at Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa, from 1 May to 31 July 2020, with follow-up until 31 October 2020. Women were considered high risk if they required specialist care for maternal, neonatal and/or anaesthetic conditions. Common maternal or obstetric conditions included hypertensive disorders, morbid obesity (body mass index (BMI) ≥40 kg/m2) and diabetes. Information on demographics, clinical features, and maternal and neonatal outcomes was collected and compared for PLHIV v. pregnant women without HIV. RESULTS: One hundred women (72 without HIV and 28 PLHIV) with high-risk pregnancies had laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. Among the 28 PLHIV, the median (interquartile range) CD4 count was 441 (317 - 603) cells/µL, and 19/26 (73%) were virologically suppressed. COVID-19 was diagnosed predominantly in the third trimester (81%). Obesity (BMI ≥30 in n=61/81; 75%) and hypertensive disorders were frequent comorbidities. Of the 100 women, 40% developed severe or critical COVID-19, 15% required intensive care unit admission and 6% needed invasive ventilation. Eight women died, 1 from advanced HIV disease complicated by bacteraemia and urosepsis. The crude maternal mortality rate was substantially higher in women with COVID-19 compared with all other deliveries at our institution during this period (8/91 (9%) v. 7/4 058 (0.2%); p<0.001). Neonatal outcomes were favourable. No significant differences in COVID-19 risk factors, disease severity, and maternal/neonatal outcome were noted for PLHIV v. those without HIV. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of high-risk pregnant women, the impact of COVID-19 was severe, significantly increasing maternal mortality risk compared with baseline rates. Virally suppressed HIV infection was not associated with worse COVID-19 outcomes in pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome , Adult , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Maternal Mortality , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Prospective Studies , South Africa
11.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6788-6793, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562395

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to report a case of mild novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in a pregnant woman with probable viremia, as reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing of endometrial and placental swabs for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was positive. A 26-year-old multigravida at 35 weeks 2 days of gestation, who had extensive thigh and abdominal cellulitis, tested SARS-CoV-2 positive by RT-PCR performed on samples from the endometrium and maternal side of the placenta. However, other samples (amniotic fluid, fetal side of the placenta, umbilical cord, maternal vagina, and neonatal nasopharynx) tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. This is one of the rare reports of probable SARS-CoV-2 viremia with the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the endometrium and placenta, but not leading to vertical transmission and neonatal infection. Because knowledge about transplacental transmission and results is very limited, we conclude that more RT-PCR tests on placental and cord blood samples are needed in order to safely make definite conclusions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Fetus/virology , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viremia/virology , Adult , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women
12.
Placenta ; 117: 187-193, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550030

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Recent evidence supports the - rare - occurrence of vertical transplacental SARS-CoV-2 transmission. We previously determined that placental expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, and associated viral cell entry regulators is upregulated by hypoxia. In the present study, we utilized a clinically relevant model of SARS-CoV-2-associated chronic histiocytic intervillositis/massive perivillous fibrin deposition (CHIV/MPFVD) to test the hypothesis that placental hypoxia may facilitate placental SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: We performed a comparative immunohistochemical and/or RNAscope in-situ hybridization analysis of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, hypoxia marker), ACE2 and SARS-CoV-2 expression in free-floating versus fibrin-encased chorionic villi in a 20-weeks' gestation placenta with SARS-CoV-2-associated CHIV/MPVFD. RESULTS: The levels of CAIX and ACE2 immunoreactivity were significantly higher in trophoblastic cells of fibrin-encased villi than in those of free-floating villi, consistent with hypoxia-induced ACE2 upregulation. SARS-CoV-2 showed a similar preferential localization to trophoblastic cells of fibrin-encased villi. DISCUSSION: The localization of SARS-CoV-2 to hypoxic, fibrin-encased villi in this placenta with CHIV/MPVFD suggests placental infection and, therefore, transplacental SARS-CoV-2 transmission may be promoted by hypoxic conditions, mediated by ACE2 and similar hypoxia-sensitive viral cell entry mechanisms. Understanding of a causative link between placental hypoxia and SARS-CoV-2 transmittability may potentially lead to the development of alternative strategies for prevention of intrauterine COVID-19 transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fibrin/analysis , Hypoxia/virology , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/analysis , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Carbonic Anhydrase IX/analysis , Chorionic Villi/enzymology , Chorionic Villi/virology , Female , Gestational Age , Histiocytes/pathology , Humans , Hypoxia/pathology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Necrosis/virology , Placenta/chemistry , Placenta/pathology , Pregnancy , Stillbirth , Trophoblasts/enzymology , Trophoblasts/virology
13.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 384, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547779

ABSTRACT

The first cases of infection caused by new SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus were reported in China in December 2019. This disease is called COVID-19 and has been declared as a pandemic by the WHO three months after its outbreak (in March 2020). In most cases it results in non-severe infectious syndrome associated with different degrees of benign symptoms (fever, cough, myalgia, headache and potential digestive disorders). SARS-CoV-2 can cause severe lung diseased and, sometimes, it results in death. Data on its consequences during pregnancy are limited. Currently, data on SARS-CoV-2 infection are reassuring and don´t indicate a higher risk of infection or a superimposed risk of complications in pregnant women compared to the general population. A few exceptional cases of maternal mortality have been reported, but they occur, most often, in patients with other diseases, in particular pre-eclampsia. This retrospective study highlights the clinical, biological and evolutionary materno-fetal data collected in the COVID-19 Military Field Hospital of Benslimane, Morocco, over a period of 3 months, from 21st July to 21 October 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome , Adult , Female , Hospitals, Military , Humans , Morocco , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
14.
Prenat Diagn ; 41(8): 998-1008, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544370

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Identify the potential for and risk factors of SARS-CoV-2 vertical transmission. METHODS: Symptomatic pregnant women with COVID-19 diagnosis in whom PCR for SARS-CoV-2 was performed at delivery using maternal serum and at least one of the biological samples: cord blood (CB), amniotic fluid (AF), colostrum and/or oropharyngeal swab (OPS) of the neonate. The association of parameters with maternal, AF and/or CB positivity and the influence of SARS-CoV-2 positivity in AF and/or CB on neonatal outcomes were investigated. RESULTS: Overall 73.4% (80/109) were admitted in hospital due to COVID-19, 22.9% needed intensive care and there were four maternal deaths. Positive RT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 was observed in 14.7% of maternal blood, 13.9% of AF, 6.7% of CB, 2.1% of colostrum and 3.7% of OPS samples. The interval between COVID-19 symptoms and delivery was inversely associated with SARS-CoV-2 positivity in the maternal blood (p = 0.002) and in the AF and/or CB (p = 0.049). Maternal viremia was associated with positivity for SARS-CoV-2 in AF and/or CB (p = 0.001). SARS-CoV-2 positivity in the compartments was not associated with neonatal outcomes. CONCLUSION: Vertical transmission is possible in pregnant women with COVID-19 and a shorter interval between maternal symptoms and delivery is an influencing factor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Amniotic Fluid/virology , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Colostrum/virology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality , Prospective Studies , Young Adult
15.
Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol ; 60(6): 1043-1046, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525965

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Aim of this study is to evaluate the prognosis of pregnant women having SARS-CoV-2 infection and investigate whether there was a difference in perinatal outcomes between pregnant women who had SARS-CoV-2 infection and those who did not. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective observational study was conducted with 116 singleton pregnancies. Cases enrolling in the study were divided into two groups. While those in the first group had a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection (n = 46) the second group consisted of healthy pregnant women (n = 70). RESULTS: Emergency Cesarean section was performed on three SARS-CoV-2 infected pregnancies (30, 33 and 34 gestational weeks). Intensive care unit admission was required for all three cases after delivery and two of them died. Among the pregnancies that had an infection in the third trimester, 71.4% (n = 20) of them had delivery in 14 days after diagnosis and 17.4% (n = 8) of their newborns were followed up at newborn intensive care unit. Overall, only one newborn had a positive swab test result for SARS-CoV-2. There was no statistically significant difference between groups regarding their delivery week (37.02 ± 5.85 vs 38.5 ± 2.33). Similarly, there was no significant difference between groups, concerning mean age, parity, and birth weight (P = 0.707, P = 0.092, P = 0.334; P < 0.05). Furthermore, the difference between SARS-CoV-2 infected pregnancies that were followed up as inpatient or outpatient with respect to the delivery week and birth weight was not significant (p > 0.05). Also, APGAR 5 scores of hospitalized women (9.3 ± 1.1) were found to be lower than the outpatient group (9.8 ± 0.8) (P = 0.043; p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: No significant difference was detected between groups in terms of the delivery week, birth weight, and APGAR scores. The inpatient group was found to have lower APGAR 5 scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Delivery, Obstetric , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality , Pregnant Women/psychology , Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , Birth Weight , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Int J Med Sci ; 18(3): 763-767, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524479

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and is an emerging disease. There has been a rapid increase in cases and deaths since it was identified in Wuhan, China, in early December 2019, with over 4,000,000 cases of COVID-19 including at least 250,000 deaths worldwide as of May 2020. However, limited data about the clinical characteristics of pregnant women with COVID-19 have been reported. Given the maternal physiologic and immune function changes during pregnancy, pregnant women may be at a higher risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 and developing more complicated clinical events. Information on severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) may provide insights into the effects of COVID-19's during pregnancy. Even though SARS and MERS have been associated with miscarriage, intrauterine death, fetal growth restriction and high case fatality rates, the clinical course of COVID-19 pneumonia in pregnant women has been reported to be similar to that in non-pregnant women. In addition, pregnant women do not appear to be at a higher risk of catching COVID-19 or suffering from more severe disease than other adults of similar age. Moreover, there is currently no evidence that the virus can be transmitted to the fetus during pregnancy or during childbirth. Babies and young children are also known to only experience mild forms of COVID-19. The aims of this systematic review were to summarize the possible symptoms, treatments, and pregnancy outcomes of women infected with COVID-19 during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Maternal Exposure , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Severity of Illness Index
17.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(12): 1236-1243, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521902

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine if laboratory inflammatory markers can predict critical disease in symptomatic COVID-19 pregnant women. STUDY DESIGN: Multicenter, retrospective cohort study of all pregnant women presenting to New York City Health + Hospitals emergency departments from March 1 to May 30, 2020. We assessed all symptomatic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) positive pregnant women with room air oxygen saturation <95% on presentation. Logistic regression modeled the relationship of inflammatory markers to outcomes. Area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and maximum Youden index determined prognostic ability and optimal predictive cut-off values. RESULTS: A total of 498 of 5,002 pregnant women were SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR positive of which 77 presented with hypoxemia. The absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) were highly sensitive for progression to severe illness. ROC curve analysis identified predictive cutoffs: ALC < 1.49 × 109/L (96% sensitivity, 52% specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.70-0.90) and NLR >8.1 (100% sensitivity, 70% specificity, AUC = 0.86 (95% CI: [0.76-0.96]). CONCLUSION: ALC and NLR on presentation are sensitive markers of progression to critical COVID-19 disease in symptomatic pregnant women. This finding provides a practical, rapid method for assessment and can assist clinicians with decision-making regarding triage, level of care, and patient management. KEY POINTS: · Few tools exist to gauge risk of severe COVID-19 disease in pregnancy.. · ALC and NLR are sensitive predictive markers of disease progression in symptomatic women.. · Cut-off values for ALC and NLR will help direct patient triage and management..


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/virology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity
18.
Arch Iran Med ; 24(9): 713-721, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485772

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence and fast spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) threatens the world as a new public health crisis. Little is known about its effects during pregnancy. This study aimed to investigate the clinical manifestations of COVID-19 on maternal and neonatal outcomes. METHODS: In this systematic review, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were searched focusing on pregnancy and perinatal outcomes of COVID-19. RESULTS: The initial search yielded 1236 articles, from which finally 21 unique studies, involving 151 pregnant women and 17 neonates, met the criteria. Mean ± SD age of included mothers and mean ± SD gestational age at admission were 30.6 ± 6.2 years and 30.8 ± 8.9 weeks, respectively. The common symptoms were fever, cough, fatigue, dyspnea and myalgia. The mortality rates of pregnant women and neonates were 28 out of 151 (18.5%) and 4 out of 17 (23.5%), respectively. Most of the neonates were preterm at the time of delivery. Three neonates had positive RT-PCR test on the first day after birth and three others on day two. On the average, neonate's PCR became positive on day 4 for the first time. CONCLUSION: Early diagnosis of COVID-19 is crucial due to the possibility of the prenatal complications. Strict prevention strategies may reduce the risk of mother to infant transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adult , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Iran/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality
19.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(11): 1328-1340, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485410

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: SARS-CoV-2 can undergo maternal-fetal transmission, heightening interest in the placental pathology findings from this infection. Transplacental SARS-CoV-2 transmission is typically accompanied by chronic histiocytic intervillositis together with necrosis and positivity of syncytiotrophoblast for SARS-CoV-2. Hofbauer cells are placental macrophages that have been involved in viral diseases, including HIV and Zika virus, but their involvement in SARS-CoV-2 is unknown. OBJECTIVE.­: To determine whether SARS-CoV-2 can extend beyond the syncytiotrophoblast to enter Hofbauer cells, endothelium, and other villous stromal cells in infected placentas of liveborn and stillborn infants. DESIGN.­: Case-based retrospective analysis by 29 perinatal and molecular pathology specialists of placental findings from a preselected cohort of 22 SARS-CoV-2-infected placentas delivered to pregnant women testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 from 7 countries. Molecular pathology methods were used to investigate viral involvement of Hofbauer cells, villous capillary endothelium, syncytiotrophoblast, and other fetal-derived cells. RESULTS.­: Chronic histiocytic intervillositis and trophoblast necrosis were present in all 22 placentas (100%). SARS-CoV-2 was identified in Hofbauer cells from 4 of 22 placentas (18.2%). Villous capillary endothelial staining was positive in 2 of 22 cases (9.1%), both of which also had viral positivity in Hofbauer cells. Syncytiotrophoblast staining occurred in 21 of 22 placentas (95.5%). Hofbauer cell hyperplasia was present in 3 of 22 placentas (13.6%). In the 7 cases having documented transplacental infection of the fetus, 2 (28.6%) occurred in placentas with Hofbauer cell staining positive for SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS.­: SARS-CoV-2 can extend beyond the trophoblast into the villous stroma, involving Hofbauer cells and capillary endothelial cells, in a small number of infected placentas. Most cases of SARS-CoV-2 transplacental fetal infection occur without Hofbauer cell involvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Macrophages/virology , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Proliferation , Endothelium/pathology , Endothelium/virology , Female , Humans , Hyperplasia/pathology , Hyperplasia/virology , Infant, Newborn , Macrophages/pathology , Macrophages/physiology , Male , Placenta/pathology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Stillbirth , Trophoblasts/pathology , Trophoblasts/virology
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