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1.
Georgian Med News ; (328-329): 100-107, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2092168

ABSTRACT

Currently, in relation to the effect of this pandemic on pregnancy, there are more questions than certainties about the real impact of COVID-19 on pregnant women. Studies are updated and often contradict each other. There is no evidence to suggest that pregnant women with COVID-19 have higher morbidity than affected non-pregnant women. We aimed to know whether maternal morbidities were more frequent in pregnant woman with COVID-19 compared to non-infected pregnant women. A retrospective case control study was conducted during a period of 6 months. Medical records were reviewed. A 120 files of COVID-19 infected women from Mosul city, and 95 files of non-infected pregnant women were reviewed and analyzed. We found that Infection with COVID-19 had a significant effect on pregnancy outcome, infected women were more likely to have higher incidence rates of adverse perinatal outcomes in both mothers and the newborns. Also, higher odds of complications associated with severe disease form Findings of our study came in line with previous studies in other countries, however, more medical care and support should be provided to pregnant women infected with COVID-19, particularly severe cases. Further studies with larger sample size are still needed for good understanding of the effect of virus on pregnancy outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Infant, Newborn , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Case-Control Studies , Retrospective Studies , Pregnancy Outcome
2.
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol ; 274: 148-154, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867112

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: BNT162b2 messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccine administered during pregnancy was found to produce a strong maternal immunoglobulin (IgG) response which crosses the placenta to the newborn. Our aim was to evaluate maternal and neonatal SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody levels at birth, following a COVID-19 booster vaccine during the third trimester. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study including women admitted to delivery ward at least 7 days after their BNT162b2 (Pfizer/BioNTech) booster vaccination without a prior clinical COVID-19 infection. SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies levels were measured in maternal blood upon admission to delivery and in the umbilical blood within 30 min following delivery. The correlation between antibody titers, feto-maternal characteristics, maternal side effects following vaccination, and time interval from vaccination to delivery were analyzed. RESULTS: Between September to November 2021, high antibody levels were measured in all 102 women and 93 neonatal blood samples, at a mean ± standard deviation duration of 7.0 ± 2.9 weeks after the third vaccine. We found positive correlation between maternal and neonatal antibodies (r = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61 to 0.81, p < 0.001), with neonatal titers approximately 1.4 times higher compared to maternal titers. In the multivariable analysis maternal antibody levels dropped by -7.2% (95% CI -12.0 to -2.3%, p = 0.005) for each week that passed since the receipt of the third vaccine dose. In contrary, systemic side effects after the third vaccine were associated with higher maternal antibody levels of 52.0% (95% CI 4.7 to 120.8%, p = 0.028). Also, for each 1 unit increase in maternal body mass index, maternal antibody levels increased by 3.6% (95% CI 0.4 to 6.9%, p = 0.025). CONCLUSIONS: BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 booster dose during the third trimester of pregnancy was associated with strong maternal and neonatal responses as reflected by maternal and neonatal SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody levels measured at birth. These findings support the administration of the COVID-19 booster to pregnant women to restore maternal and neonatal protection during the ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunoglobulin G , Antibodies, Viral , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Prospective Studies , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
3.
BJOG ; 129(2): 248-255, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831883

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of Covid-19 vaccination (Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2) during the third trimester of pregnancy on maternal and neonatal outcomes. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective computerised database. POPULATION: Women who gave birth at >24 weeks of gestation in Israel, between January and April 2021, with full records of Covid-19 disease and vaccination status. METHODS: Women who received two doses of the vaccine were compared with unvaccinated women. Women who were recorded as having disease or a positive Covid-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) swab during pregnancy or delivery were excluded from both study groups. Univariate analysis was followed by multivariate logistic regression. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Composite adverse maternal outcomes. Secondary outcomes were vaccination rate and composite adverse neonatal outcomes. RESULTS: The overall uptake of one or both vaccines was 40.2%; 712 women who received two doses of the Covid-19 vaccine were compared with 1063 unvaccinated women. Maternal composite outcomes were comparable between the groups; however, women who received the vaccine had higher rates of elective caesarean deliveries (CDs) and lower rates of vacuum deliveries. An adjusted multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that Covid-19 vaccination was not associated with maternal composite adverse outcome (aOR 0.8, 95% CI 0.61-1.03); a significant reduction in the risk for neonatal composite adverse outcomes was observed (aOR 0.5, 95% CI 0.36-0.74). CONCLUSIONS: In a motivated population covered by a National Health Insurance Plan, we found a 40.2% rate of vaccination for the Covid-19 vaccine during the third trimester of pregnancy, which was not associated with adverse maternal outcomes and, moreover, decreased the risk for neonatal adverse outcomes. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Covid-19 vaccine during pregnancy is safe for both mother and fetus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccination , /administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Israel/epidemiology , Patient Safety , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Vaccination/methods , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
4.
Am J Surg Pathol ; 46(2): 258-267, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778992

ABSTRACT

Bizarre (atypical/symplastic) cells have been described in various gynecologic normal tissues and benign neoplasms. This type of bizarre cytologic change is usually an incidental finding and is regarded as a benign process. We describe 17 cases of bizarre chorionic-type trophoblast in second-trimester and third-trimester placentas that created concern for an underlying/undersampled or incipient intraplacental trophoblastic neoplasm, predominantly found in intervillous trophoblastic islands (11/17), placental septae (6/17), chorionic plate (1/17), and/or the chorion layer of fetal membranes (2/17). The bizarre trophoblastic cells exhibited sheet-like or nested architecture, had a multifocal/patchy distribution, and/or were present as individual cells within hyaline stroma; they were characterized by large nuclei with smudgy chromatin and occasional intranuclear pseudoinclusions. The degree of atypia was classified as mild (0/17), moderate (3/17), or severe (14/17). Mitotic figures and necrosis were not identified. A dual immunohistochemical stain for trophoblast (hydroxyl-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase) and a proliferation marker (Ki-67), performed in 15 cases, demonstrated 0% to very low proliferative activity within the bizarre trophoblast (0% to 2% [10/15], 3% to 8% [5/15]). Immunohistochemical stains for fumarate hydratase showed intact/retained expression in the bizarre cells in 7 of 7 cases. Clinical follow-up ranged from 1 to 45 months, and all patients were alive and well without subsequent evidence of a gestational trophoblastic or other neoplasms. We conclude that bizarre chorionic-type trophoblast in second-trimester or third-trimester placentas have the potential to mimic an intraplacental trophoblastic neoplasm but are likely a benign degenerative change. This study expands the spectrum of bizarre cells that occur in the gynecologic tract.


Subject(s)
Placenta Diseases/pathology , Trophoblastic Neoplasms/pathology , Trophoblasts/pathology , Uterine Neoplasms/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Biopsy , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Fumarate Hydratase/analysis , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Ki-67 Antigen/analysis , Middle Aged , Multienzyme Complexes/analysis , Placenta Diseases/metabolism , Predictive Value of Tests , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimester, Second , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Progesterone Reductase/analysis , Steroid Isomerases/analysis , Trophoblastic Neoplasms/chemistry , Trophoblasts/chemistry , United States , Uterine Neoplasms/chemistry , Young Adult
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732027

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the levels of physical activity during the third trimester of pregnancy, life satisfaction and stress in women in late pregnancy and early postpartum. METHODS: The study was conducted among 740 patients of maternity wards in Cracow hospitals on days 1-8 postpartum. Patients who were surveyed before the pandemic (December 2019-March 2020) were included in the prepandemic group (PPan: n = 252). The second group of women (COVID 1 group, Cov1: n = 262) was examined in the early stages of the pandemic (May-September 2020). In turn, participants who were surveyed during the population vaccination campaign (June-September 2021) were qualified to the COVID 2 group (Cov2: n = 226). The research tools used were the original questionnaire in addition to standardized questionnaires assessing physical activity in the last trimester of pregnancy (the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire); previous life satisfaction (the Satisfaction with Life Scale); and stress levels during the last month (the Perceived Stress Scale). RESULTS: During the pandemic, women reduced the level of energy spent on total physical activity; nevertheless, statistically significant differences were found only between the PPan and Cov2 groups (p = 0.001). At the early stages of the pandemic, patients significantly reduced mobility activities (Cov1 vs. PPan: p < 0.001; Cov1 vs. Cov2: p = 0.007), while late in the pandemic they spent less energy on household activities (Cov2 vs. PPan: p = 0.002, Cov2 vs. Cov1: p = 0.002). There were no differences in the levels of stress and life satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted the level of physical activity; however, it did not change levels of perceived stress and life satisfaction in women in late-stage pregnancy and in the early puerperium.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Female , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
6.
Homeopathy ; 111(3): 202-209, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713256

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND: Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy are common physiological disturbances, causing physical, social and psychological symptoms in the affected women. Though it is difficult to draw absolute conclusions on whether or not pregnant women are at high risk of acquiring severe consequences from corona-virus disease 2019 (COVID-19), clinical experience has shown them to be potentially vulnerable to other coronaviruses. Lack of specific conventional therapy for these conditions called for a complementary and individualised homeopathy approach in the presented case. METHODS: The homeopathic medical management of early symptoms of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) and the beginning of COVID-19 symptoms shortly before a scheduled Caesarean section is described. No ongoing specific treatments were discontinued. The connection between intervention with individualised homeopathy and clinical improvement was assessed by two independent reviewers using the MOdified NARanjo Criteria for Homeopathy (MONARCH) inventory. RESULTS: There was improvement of NVP symptoms in early pregnancy and in later-onset COVID-19 symptoms following an individually prescribed unipotent homeopathic medicine, Sepia officinalis, after tele-consultation during lockdown. The agreed MONARCH score was +8 points, suggesting that homeopathy contributed to clinical improvement. CONCLUSION: Individualised homeopathy may be a helpful complementary medical approach for managing symptoms associated with NVP and COVID-19 during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Homeopathy , Pregnancy Complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cesarean Section , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Nausea/drug therapy , Nausea/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimester, First , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Vomiting/psychology
7.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667349

ABSTRACT

Globally, COVID-19 vaccines are currently being used to prevent transmission and to reduce morbidity and death associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Current research reveals that vaccines such as BNT162b2 and Ad26.COV2.S are highly immunogenic and have high short-term effectiveness for most of the known viral variants. Clinical trials showed satisfying results in the general population, but the reluctance in testing and vaccinating pregnant women left this category with little evidence regarding the safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity following COVID-19 vaccination. With the worldwide incidence of COVID-19 remaining high and the possibility of new transmissible SARS-CoV-2 mutations, data on vaccination effectiveness and antibody dynamics in pregnant patients are critical for determining the need for special care or further booster doses. An observational study was developed to evaluate pregnant women receiving the complete COVID-19 vaccination scheme using the BNT162b2 and Ad26.COV2.S, and determine pregnancy-related outcomes in the mothers and their newborns, as well as determining adverse events after vaccination and immunogenicity of vaccines during four months. There were no abnormal findings in pregnancy and newborn characteristics comparing vaccinated versus unvaccinated pregnant women. COVID-19 seropositive pregnant women had significantly higher spike antibody titers than seronegative patients with similar characteristics, although they were more likely to develop fever and lymphadenopathy following vaccination. The same group of pregnant women showed no statistically significant differences in antibody titers during a 4-month period when compared with case-matched non-pregnant women. The BNT162b2 and Ad26.COV2.S vaccines are safe to administer during the third trimester of pregnancy, while their safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity remain similar to those of the general population.


Subject(s)
/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Pregnancy Trimester, Third/immunology , /administration & dosage , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Young Adult
8.
J Med Virol ; 94(5): 2167-2173, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1640750

ABSTRACT

It is believed that the subtle equilibrium between tolerance and immunity during the unique biological state of pregnancy, which is characterized by further physiological and hormonal changes, rends pregnant women more vulnerable to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this retrospective study, confirmed COVID-19-positive pregnant women (n = 15) during their third trimester, comprising asymptomatic (n = 7) and mild symptomatic (n = 8), and healthy pregnant controls (n = 20), were enrolled between June 1, 2020 and  June 1, 2021 from the Hospital CHR Metz-Thionville in Metz, France. Vitamin D concentrations, C-reactive protein (CRP), and oxidative stress markers including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione levels, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), and the total antioxidant capacity, measured the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), were evaluated in the serum of patients and controls. Results showed that all pregnant women (patients and controls) enrolled in this study were vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/ml). However, mild COVID-19 pregnant women were severely vitamin D deficient (<12 ng/ml), which may suggest a link between vitamin D deficiency and the symptomatology of COVID-19 illness in singleton pregnancy. No differences between the levels of CRP and the majority of the studied oxidative stress markers in COVID-19-positive pregnant women (asymptomatic and/or mildly symptomatic patients) versus COVID-19-negative pregnant women were found, suggesting the absence or a low magnitude of oxidative stress in pregnant women with COVID-19. This may also explain the absence of severe courses of COVID-19 infection. More studies are warranted to investigate the role of vitamin D supplementation and antioxidant-rich diets in the prevention against severe forms of COVID-19 in pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D , Female , Humans , Oxidative Stress , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Retrospective Studies
9.
J Infect Dis ; 225(5): 748-753, 2022 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621620

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has a higher infection rate in pregnant women than age-matched adults. With increased infectivity and transmissibility, the Delta variant is predominant worldwide. METHODS: In this study, we describe intrauterine fetal demise in unvaccinated women with mild symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant infection. RESULTS: Histology and elevated proinflammatory responses of the placenta suggest that fetal demise was associated with placental malperfusion due to Delta variant infection. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the Delta variant can cause severe morbidity and mortality to fetuses. Vaccination should continue to be advocated and will likely continue to reduce SARS-CoV-2 infection risks for pregnant women and their fetuses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Fetal Death , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stillbirth , Adult , Female , Fetal Death/etiology , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimester, Third
11.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 28(3): 419-425, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504664

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the impact of early versus late third-trimester maternal severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccination on transplacental transfer and neonatal levels of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. METHODS: Maternal and cord blood sera were collected following term delivery after antenatal SARS-CoV-2 BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination, with the first vaccine dose administered between 27 and 36 weeks of gestation. SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S) and receptor-binding domain (RBD) -specific, IgG levels and neutralizing potency were evaluated in maternal and cord blood samples. RESULTS: The study cohort consisted of 171 parturients-median age 31 years (interquartile range (IQR) 27-35 years); median gestational age 39+5 weeks (IQR 38+5-40+4 weeks)-83 (48.5%) were immunized in early thrird-trimester (first dose at 27-31 weeks) and 88 (51.5%) were immunized in late third trimester (first dose at 32-36 weeks). All mother-infant paired sera were positive for anti S- and anti-RBD-specific IgG. Anti-RBD-specific IgG concentrations in neonatal sera were higher following early versus late third-trimester vaccination (median 9620 AU/mL (IQR 5131-15332 AU/mL) versus 6697 AU/mL (IQR 3157-14731 AU/mL), p 0.02), and were positively correlated with increasing time since vaccination (r = 0.26; p 0.001). Median antibody placental transfer ratios were increased following early versus late third-trimester immunization (anti-S ratio: 1.3 (IQR 1.1-1.6) versus 0.9 (IQR 0.6-1.1); anti-RBD-specific ratio: 2.3 (IQR 1.7-3.0) versus 0.7 (IQR 0.5-1.2), p < 0.001). Neutralizing antibodies placental transfer ratio was greater following early versus late third-trimester immunization (median 1.9 (IQR 1.7-2.5) versus 0.8 (IQR 0.5-1.1), p < 0.001), and was positively associated with longer duration from vaccination (r = 0.77; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Early compared with late third-trimester maternal SARS-CoV-2 immunization enhanced transplacental antibody transfer and increased neonatal neutralizing antibody levels. Our findings highlight that vaccination of pregnant women early in the third trimester may enhance neonatal seroprotection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Placenta , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccination
12.
Placenta ; 109: 72-74, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386464

ABSTRACT

Whether early SARS-CoV-2 definitively increases the risk of stillbirth is unknown, though studies have suggested possible trends of stillbirth increase during the pandemic. This study of third trimester stillbirth does not identify an increase in rates during the first wave of the pandemic period, however investigation of the placental pathology demonstrates trends towards more vascular placental abnormalities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Placenta Diseases/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Stillbirth/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Female , Fetal Death/etiology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Placenta/pathology , Placenta Diseases/etiology , Placenta Diseases/pathology , Placenta Diseases/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
13.
Cell ; 184(3): 628-642.e10, 2021 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385216

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection causes more severe disease in pregnant women compared to age-matched non-pregnant women. Whether maternal infection causes changes in the transfer of immunity to infants remains unclear. Maternal infections have previously been associated with compromised placental antibody transfer, but the mechanism underlying this compromised transfer is not established. Here, we used systems serology to characterize the Fc profile of influenza-, pertussis-, and SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies transferred across the placenta. Influenza- and pertussis-specific antibodies were actively transferred. However, SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody transfer was significantly reduced compared to influenza- and pertussis-specific antibodies, and cord titers and functional activity were lower than in maternal plasma. This effect was only observed in third-trimester infection. SARS-CoV-2-specific transfer was linked to altered SARS-CoV-2-antibody glycosylation profiles and was partially rescued by infection-induced increases in IgG and increased FCGR3A placental expression. These results point to unexpected compensatory mechanisms to boost immunity in neonates, providing insights for maternal vaccine design.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Maternal-Fetal Exchange/immunology , Placenta/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimester, Third/immunology , Receptors, IgG/immunology , THP-1 Cells
14.
Reprod Biol Endocrinol ; 19(1): 126, 2021 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362058

ABSTRACT

In late December 2019, the COVID-19 pandemic caused a great threat to people's lives worldwide. As a special category of the population, pregnant women are vulnerable during emergencies. This study was designed to explore whether or not the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced maternal and infant outcomes. We collected maternal characteristics, laboratory results, condition in the third trimester, maternal outcome, fetal or neonatal outcomes, and characteristics of amniotic fluid, umbilical cord and placenta from pregnant women and fetals or newborns in the first affiliated hospital of Jinan university from 24 January to 31 March 2020 (peak period), chose the same types of data at the hospital during the same period in 2019 and 1 January-23 January 2020 (prior to the outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020) as a control. Our study focused on uncomplicated singleton pregnancies among women not infected by COVID-19. The results demonstrated that there was not an increase in adverse outcomes of pregnant women and newborns during the COVID-19 pandemic; This might be associated with the updated design of major epidemic prevention and control systems in Guangzhou, and the extension of pregnant women's rest time during the third trimester of pregnancy. Nevertheless, the survey showed an increased incidence rate of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and zinc deficiency in newborns during the epidemic, implying that pregnant women should participate in appropriate physical exercise, increase their exposure to outdoor sunlight and improve nutrition intake to ensure healthy newborns during the quarantine period. Our study has provided some guidance for maternal management during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/psychology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Trimester, Third/psychology , Retrospective Studies
15.
Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol ; 60(5): 945-948, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336975

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) is a global health crisis. Although pregnant women are a vulnerable population during the infectious pandemics, extremely rare cases of pregnant women infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are described in Taiwan. We share our experience to manage a pregnant women with COVID-19 in the third trimester and subsequent delivery at term. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old woman presented with sore throat, cough and rhinorrhea was diagnosed as laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection at the 35 gestational weeks (GW). During the hospitalization, the disease progressed with a need of oxygen supplement and prednisolone therapy. She was discharged uneventfully at 37 GW. Finally, she delivered a female baby with Apgar score of 8-9 points at 38 GW by cesarean section due to the deformity of pelvic cavity resulted from previous surgery for pelvic bone tumor. Both mother and her offspring (without SARS-CoV-2 infection) were discharged uneventfully. CONCLUSION: Our report adds the growing body of experience toward management of pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Decision making of timing and method of delivery is regarding to individualized condition and hospital setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cesarean Section , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Adult , Apgar Score , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Prednisolone/therapeutic use , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy
16.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(1)2021 Jan 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314115

ABSTRACT

A 31-year-old G3P2002 with history of two prior caesarean sections presented with influenza-like illness, requiring intubation secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Investigations revealed intrauterine fetal demise at 30-week gestation.She soon deteriorated with sepsis and multiple organs impacted. Risks of the gravid uterus impairing cardiopulmonary function appeared greater than risks of delivery, including that of uterine rupture. Vaginal birth after caesarean was achieved with misoprostol and critical care status rapidly improved.Current guidelines for management of fetal demise in patients with prior hysterotomies are mixed: although the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends standard obstetric protocols rather than misoprostol administration for labour augmentation, there is limited published data citing severe maternal morbidity associated with misoprostol use. This case report argues misoprostol-augmented induction of labour can be a reasonable option in a medically complex patient with fetal demise and prior hysterotomies.


Subject(s)
Fetal Death/etiology , Labor, Induced/methods , Labor, Obstetric/drug effects , Misoprostol/administration & dosage , Oxytocics/administration & dosage , Administration, Intravaginal , Adult , Delivery, Obstetric/standards , Female , Humans , Hysterotomy/adverse effects , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Misoprostol/pharmacology , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Oxytocics/pharmacology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome , Uterine Rupture/prevention & control
18.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 505, 2021 Jul 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1308092

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Evidence on the outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy is generally reassuring but yet not definitive. METHODS: To specifically assess the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection in late pregnancy, we prospectively recruited 315 consecutive women delivering in a referral hospital located in Lombardy, Italy in the early phase of the epidemic. Restriction of the recruitment to this peculiar historical time period allowed to exclude infections occurring early in pregnancy and to limit the recall bias. All recruited subjects underwent a nasopharyngeal swab to assess the presence of Sars-Cov-2 using Real-time PCR. In addition, two different types of antibodies for the virus were evaluated in peripheral blood, those against the spike proteins S1 and S2 of the envelope and those against the nucleoprotein of the nucleocapsid. Women were considered to have had SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy if at least one of the three assessments was positive. RESULTS: Overall, 28 women had a diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy (8.9%). Women diagnosed with the infection were more likely to report one or more episodes of symptoms suggestive for Covid-19 (n = 11, 39.3%) compared to unaffected women (n = 39, 13.6%). The corresponding OR was 4.11 (95%CI: 1.79-9.44). Symptoms significantly associated with Covid-19 in pregnancy included fever, cough, dyspnea and anosmia. Only one woman necessitated intensive care. Pregnancy outcome in women with and without SARS-CoV-2 infection did not also differ. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 infection is asymptomatic in three out of five women in late pregnancy and is rarely severe. In addition, pregnancy outcome may not be markedly affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adult , Anosmia/physiopathology , Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
19.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(6)2021 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282061

ABSTRACT

This article presents an unusual case of appendicitis in pregnancy complicated by the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). The novel coronavirus has affected the way medicine is practised across most parts of the world with over 160 000 000 global cases to date. Tackling management of these cases is more complex when other pathological processes are ongoing. Appendicitis is a common occurrence in pregnancy, with most obstetric centres seeing about one or two cases a year. Though maternal morbidity and mortality are relatively unimpacted by this event, fetal loss and preterm labour are common sequelae. This case involves a 35-year-old woman presenting in her third trimester with abdominal pain and who went on to be diagnosed with concurrent appendicitis and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Although spinal anaesthesia would be most appropriate as it avoids aerosol generation, general anaesthetic techniques were indicated due to thrombocytopenia in this case. She underwent a successful appendicectomy, although preterm delivery was indicated as a result of maternal and fetal concerns.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis , COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adult , Appendectomy , Appendicitis/complications , Appendicitis/diagnosis , Appendicitis/surgery , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , SARS-CoV-2
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