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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 191, 2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736354

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 social restrictions have increased the risk for depression compared to the previous period in Italian women with Low-Risk Pregnancy (LRP). lLess is known about the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on High-Risk Pregnancy (HRP). This study aimed: 1) to explore levels of depression in women who become pregnant before and during COVID-19 pandemic, distinguishing between LRP and HRP; 2) to analyze the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on pregnancy experience in LRP and HRP. METHODS: A before-during COVID-19 pandemic cross-sectional study was carried out on 155 pregnant women (Mean age = 34.18), between 23 and 32 weeks of gestation. 77 women were recruited before COVID-19 pandemic (51.9% LRP; 48.1% HRP) and 78 women were recruited during COVID-19 pandemic (51.3% LRP; 48.7% HRP). HRP group was enrolled during hospitalization for high-risk pregnancy. Participants filled out Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Moreover, only COVID-19 group answered an open-ended question about the impact of restriction on pregnancy experience. RESULTS: HRP women reported higher levels of depressive symptoms than LRP. No difference emerged for COVID (before/during) but an interaction effect between COVID-19 and obstetric condition was found. The qualitative results showed the impact of restrictions on emotions and concerns. CONCLUSION: Respect to the previous period, LRP women during COVID-19 presented an increased risk for depressive symptoms than HRP. The HRP women during COVID-19 seemed to use hospitalization as a resource to find a social support network with other pregnant women and to be reassured on the clinical ongoing of pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Pregnancy, High-Risk/psychology , Pregnant Women/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Middle Aged , Pregnancy/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Quality of Health Care , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 153, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724453

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pregnant women are vulnerable to psychological problems depending on the adaptive capacities of their personality and coping strategies. This study aimed to investigate the association between coping strategies of pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic and depression. METHODS: This web-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 2021 on 318 pregnant women in Amol, Iran. Data collection was performed via questionnaires (Brief cope, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, CDA, and Demographic questionnaire). The questionnaires were completed through the WhatsApp and Telegram applications. Data were analyzed using the hierarchical regression analysis and SPSS software (v. 21) at the significance level of 0.05. RESULTS: About 40% of participants had depression. The most prevalent coping strategy used by pregnant women was the avoidance strategy. Hierarchical regression revealed that the coping strategy of avoidance was a significant predictor of depression (ß = 0.226, p = 0.046) after controlling background characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that avoidance style associated with depression in pregnant women. Therefore, obtaining further knowledge about impacts of coping strategies on pregnant women seems to be essential.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19 , Depression , Pandemics , Pregnant Women , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Iran , Pregnancy/psychology , Pregnant Women/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 851, 2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594954

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infectious outbreaks are known to cause fear and panic. Exploration of pregnant individuals' psychosocial condition using a qualitative lens during an infectious outbreak is limited. In this study we explore pregnant individuals' lived experiences as well as their psychological and behavioural responses during COVID-19 with the goal of providing useful strategies from the patient's perspective to enable health care providers to help pregnant patients navigate this and future pandemics. METHODS: Pregnant individuals between 20-weeks gestation and 3 months postpartum who received maternity care from an urban academic interprofessional teaching unit in Toronto, Canada were invited to participate. Semi-structured 60 min interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed using descriptive thematic analysis. Interview questions probed psychological responses to the pandemic, behavioural and lifestyle changes, strategies to mitigate distress while pregnant during COVID-19 and advice for other patients and the healthcare team. RESULTS: There were 12 participants, mean age 35 years (range 30-43 years), all 1 to 6 months postpartum. Six main themes emerged: 1) Childbearing-related challenges to everyday life; 2) Increased worry, uncertainty and fear; 3) Pervasive sense of loss; 4) Challenges accessing care; 5) Strategies for coping with pandemic stress; 6) Reflections and advice to other pregnant people and health care professionals. Pregnant individuals described lack of social support due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions and a profound sense of loss of what they thought their pregnancy and postpartum period should have been. Advice to healthcare providers included providing mental health support, clear and up to date communication as well as more postpartum and breastfeeding support. CONCLUSIONS: These participants described experiencing psychosocial distress during their pregnancies and postpartum. In a stressful situation such as a global pandemic, health care providers need to play a pivotal role to ensure pregnant individuals feel supported and receive consistent care throughout the pregnancy and postpartum period. The health care provider should ensure that mental health concerns are addressed and provide postpartum and breastfeeding support. Without addressing this need for support, parental mental health, relationships, parent-infant bonding, and infant development may be negatively impacted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Maternal Health Services/standards , Mental Health , Psychological Distress , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support
4.
J Health Commun ; 26(7): 473-479, 2021 07 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409987

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women are especially vulnerable to COVID-19 while the short- and long-term impact of COVID-19 on maternal and infant health is only partially understood. We assessed the amount of uncertainty and anxiety pregnant women experienced about COVID-19 and whether, and the extent to which, they engaged in information seeking about COVID-19. In total, 320 pregnant women from 38 states took part in this research. The results showed that pregnant women experienced uncertainty and anxiety about pregnancy and breastfeeding and engaged in information seeking from their healthcare providers. Pregnant women's uncertainty influenced information seeking via anxiety, but the effect varied depending on participants' assessments of coping, communication, and target efficacy. While healthcare providers need to discuss ways to avoid COVID-19 infection, participants were assured that their providers had a plan to help them if they became infected with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Information Seeking Behavior , Pandemics , Pregnant Women/psychology , Uncertainty , Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Physician-Patient Relations , Pregnancy/psychology , United States/epidemiology
5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2124273, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409779

ABSTRACT

Importance: Early evidence shows a decrease in the number of US births during the COVID-19 pandemic, yet few studies have examined individual-level factors associated with pregnancy intention changes, especially among diverse study populations or in areas highly affected by COVID-19 in the US. Objective: To study changes in pregnancy intention following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic and identify factors possibly associated with these changes. Design, Setting, and Participants: A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted among women who were currently pregnant or had delivered a live infant and responded to a survey emailed to 2603 women (n = 1560). Women who were mothers of young children enrolled in the prospective New York University Children's Health and Environment Study birth cohort were included; women who were not currently pregnant or recently postpartum were excluded. Exposures: Demographic, COVID-19-related, stress-related, and financial/occupational factors were assessed via a survey administered from April 20 to August 31, 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Pregnancy intentions before the COVID-19 pandemic and change in pregnancy intentions following the outbreak. Results: Of the 2603 women who were sent the survey, 1560 (59.9%) who were currently pregnant or had delivered a live infant responded, and 1179 women (75.6%) answered the pregnancy intention questions. Mean (SD) age was 32.2 (5.6) years. Following the outbreak, 30 of 61 (49.2%) women who had been actively trying to become pregnant had ceased trying, 71 of 191 (37.2%) women who had been planning to become pregnant were no longer planning, and 42 of 927 (4.5%) women who were neither planning nor trying were newly considering pregnancy. Among those who ceased trying, fewer than half (13 [43.3%]) thought they would resume after the pandemic. Of those pre-COVID-19 planners/triers who stopped considering or attempting pregnancy, a greater proportion had lower educational levels, although the difference was not statistically significant on multivariable analysis (odds ratio [OR], 2.14; 95% CI, 0.92-4.96). The same was true for those with higher stress levels (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.99-1.20) and those with greater financial insecurity (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.97-1.92. Those who stopped considering or attempting pregnancy were more likely to respond to the questionnaire during the peak of the outbreak (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.01-4.11). Of those pre-COVID-19 nonplanners/nontriers who reported newly thinking about becoming pregnant, a smaller proportion responded during the peak, although the finding was not statistically significant on multivariable analysis (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.26-1.03). Likewise, fewer respondents who were financially insecure reported newly considering pregnancy, although the finding was not statistically significant (OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.46-1.03). They were significantly less likely to be of Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 0.27; 955 CI, 0.10-0.71) and more likely to have fewer children in the home (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40-0.98) or self-report a COVID-19 diagnosis (OR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.31-5.55). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cross-sectional study of 1179 women who were mothers of young children in New York City, increased stress and financial insecurity owing to the COVID-19 pandemic paralleled a reduction in pregnancy intention in the early months of the pandemic, potentially exacerbating long-term decreases in the fertility rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Intention , Mothers/psychology , Pregnancy/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mothers/statistics & numerical data , New York City , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Matern Child Health J ; 25(7): 1057-1068, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291367

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pregnancy and postpartum periods require continuity in care and counseling. During the pandemic process, telemedicine and telenursing applications have been used to meet the need for healthcare throughout the world, and skills in this area have been developed. This study aimed to identify the use of mobile applications by pregnant women in receiving health information, counseling, and healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic and their distress levels during pregnancy. METHODS: This research was a descriptive cross-sectional study. The study was designed as an online survey administered between August 2020 and November 2020 via a questionnaire and the Tilburg Pregnancy Distress Scale (TPDS). A total of 376 women agreed to participate in the study. Women were included if they were literate, had a gestational age of ≥ 12th weeks, and accommodated within the Republic of Turkey's boundaries. RESULTS: A total of 77.9% of participants reported using pregnancy-related mobile applications during the pandemic. The mean total Tilburg Pregnancy Distress Scale score was 24.09, and 37.2% of the participants were found to be at risk for high distress according to the cut-off point. There was a significant difference between the change in receiving health services and the anxiety about coronavirus transmission and the Tilburg Pregnancy Distress Scale total score. (p ≤ 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study helped understand the pandemic's impact on pregnancy distress and usage of mobile health applications by pregnant women during the pandemic. Also, our results indicate that a decrease in pregnant women receiving health services during this period. Mobile health applications appear to be usable for prenatal follow-ups because mobile applications are common among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Maternal Health Services , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Psychological Distress , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pregnancy/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
Obstet Gynecol ; 137(6): 1032-1040, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217911

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a consumer-based mobile meditation application (app) on wellness in outpatient obstetric and gynecology patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial at a university outpatient clinic of obstetric and gynecology patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Women were randomly assigned to the intervention group, who was prescribed a mobile meditation app for 30 days, or the control group, which received standard care. The primary outcome was self-reported perceived stress. Secondary outcomes included self-reported depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and satisfaction with the meditation app. A sample size of 80 participants (40 per group) was calculated to achieve 84% power to detect a 3-point difference in the primary outcome. RESULTS: From April to May 2020, 101 women were randomized in the study-50 in the meditation app group and 51 in the control group. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Most characteristics were similar between groups. Perceived stress was significantly less in the intervention group at days 14 and 30 (mean difference 4.27, 95% CI 1.30-7.24, P=.005, d=0.69 and mean difference 4.28, 95% CI 1.68-6.88, P=.002, d=0.69, respectively). Self-reported depression and anxiety were significantly less in the intervention group at days 14 and 30 (depression: P=.002 and P=.04; anxiety: P=.01, and P=.04, respectively). Sleep disturbance was significantly less in the intervention group at days 14 and 30 (P=.001 and P=.02, respectively). More than 80% of those in the intervention group reported high satisfaction with the meditation app, and 93% reported that mindfulness meditation improved their stress. CONCLUSION: Outpatient obstetric and gynecology patients who used the prescribed consumer-based mobile meditation app during the COVID-19 pandemic had significant reductions in perceived stress, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance compared with standard care. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04329533.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Pregnancy/psychology , Prenatal Care/methods , Primary Health Care/methods , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Gynecology , Humans , Meditation/psychology , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Obstetrics , Pandemics
8.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249780, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197377

ABSTRACT

Pregnant and postpartum women face unique challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic that may put them at elevated risk of mental health problems. However, few large-scale and no cross-national studies have been conducted to date that investigate modifiable pandemic-related behavioral or cognitive factors that may influence mental health in this vulnerable group. This international study sought to identify and measure the associations between pandemic-related information seeking, worries, and prevention behaviors on perinatal mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. An anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey of pregnant and postpartum women was conducted in 64 countries between May 26, 2020 and June 13, 2020. The survey, available in twelve languages, was hosted on the Pregistry platform for COVID-19 studies (https://corona.pregistry.com) and advertised in social media channels and online parenting forums. Participants completed measures on demographics, COVID-19 exposure and worries, information seeking, COVID-19 prevention behaviors, and mental health symptoms including posttraumatic stress via the IES-6, anxiety/depression via the PHQ-4, and loneliness via the UCLA-3. Of the 6,894 participants, substantial proportions of women scored at or above the cut-offs for elevated posttraumatic stress (2,979 [43%]), anxiety/depression (2,138 [31%], and loneliness (3,691 [53%]). Information seeking from any source (e.g., social media, news, talking to others) five or more times per day was associated with more than twice the odds of elevated posttraumatic stress and anxiety/depression, in adjusted models. A majority of women (86%) reported being somewhat or very worried about COVID-19. The most commonly reported worries were related to pregnancy and delivery, including family being unable to visit after delivery (59%), the baby contracting COVID-19 (59%), lack of a support person during delivery (55%), and COVID-19 causing changes to the delivery plan (41%). Greater worries related to children (i.e., inadequate childcare, their infection risk) and missing medical appointments were associated with significantly higher odds of posttraumatic stress, anxiety/depression and loneliness. Engaging in hygiene-related COVID-19 prevention behaviors (face mask-wearing, washing hands, disinfecting surfaces) were not related to mental health symptoms or loneliness. Elevated posttraumatic stress, anxiety/depression, and loneliness are highly prevalent in pregnant and postpartum women across 64 countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. Excessive information seeking and worries related to children and medical care are associated with elevated symptoms, whereas engaging in hygiene-related preventive measures were not. In addition to screening and monitoring mental health symptoms, addressing excessive information seeking and women's worries about access to medical care and their children's well-being, and developing strategies to target loneliness (e.g., online support groups) should be part of intervention efforts for perinatal women. Public health campaigns and medical care systems need to explicitly address the impact of COVID-19 related stressors on mental health in perinatal women, as prevention of viral exposure itself does not mitigate the pandemic's mental health impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pregnancy/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Parturition/psychology , Perinatal Care , Postpartum Period/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Women's Health
9.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 19(1): 66, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of COVID-19 pandemic on mental health of pregnant and lactating women is unclear. This study aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 on psychological health, sexual function, and quality of life (QoL) in Iranian pregnant and lactating women and compare the results with non-pregnant/non-lactating women. METHOD: This comparative cross-sectional study was carried out on pregnant and lactating women, with non-pregnant/non-lactating women from May to Jun 2020. Patients were asked to complete three questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). One-way ANOVA was used to reveal the statistical differences between the three groups. RESULT: The mean age of patients was 20.81 ± 5.92 years old. The mean (SD) score of HADS in pregnant, lactating and non-pregnant / non-lactating women were 12.11 (6.72), 11.98 (8.44) and 9.38 (6.2) respectively, and the results showed that the scores in pregnant, lactating women were higher than non-pregnant / non-lactating women (P < 0.001). Also the mean (SD) score of QOL and FSFI was 68.29 (9.47), 74.18 (12.65), 79.03 (10.48) and 22.71 (8.16), 22.72 (8.16), 26.19 (3.93) in three groups and the scores in pregnant, lactating women were lower than non-pregnant/non-lactating women (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 epidemic increases the risk of depression, anxiety, FSD, and lowers QoL in pregnant and lactating women, with the general population. This suggests the urgent need for psychological intervention in the maternal population during the epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Lactation/psychology , Mental Health , Pregnancy/psychology , Quality of Life , Adolescent , Adult , Analysis of Variance , Anxiety/epidemiology , Breast Feeding , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
Contraception ; 103(6): 380-385, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082588

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand how the COVID-19 pandemic affected women of reproductive age, specifically their economic conditions, desire for pregnancy, and access to contraceptive services during the pandemic. STUDY DESIGNS: A total of 554 women respondents age 18 to 49 and reside in the United States were recruited using social media between May 16, 2020 and June 16, 2020. Logistic regression models assessed predictors of reporting pandemic-related changes in economic conditions, desire for pregnancy, and contraceptive access. RESULTS: Compared to White/Caucasian respondents, Hispanics/Latinx and Black/African Americans have 4 times the odds of experiencing inability to afford food, transportation, and/or housing (p < 0.01) during the pandemic; Hispanics/Latinx have twice the odds of experiencing food insecurity (p < 0.05). Inability to afford food, transportation, and/or housing was associated with drop in desire to be pregnant (p < 0.01). Despite the 25% of participants who reported a drop in desire for pregnancy, 1 in 6 reported difficulty accessing contraceptives, particularly those who experienced reduced income (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, the pandemic unevenly affected people from different socioeconomic groups. Many simultaneously experienced reduced income, difficulties in accessing contraception, and a greater desire to avoid a pregnancy. This combination of factors increases the chance that people will experience unintended pregnancies. IMPLICATIONS: The pandemic caused economic hardship and an increased desire to postpone or prevent pregnancy at the same time that it created new barriers to contraceptive services. This pattern may lead to a potential net effect of an increase in unintended pregnancy, particularly among people who had difficulty affording food, transportation, and/or housing during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , Family Planning Services/supply & distribution , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Intention , Poverty , Pregnancy, Unplanned , Pregnancy/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Contraceptive Agents/supply & distribution , Economics , Family Planning Services/economics , Female , Health Services Accessibility/economics , Humans , Logistic Models , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Poverty/economics , Poverty/ethnology , Poverty/psychology , Pregnancy/ethnology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
11.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12196, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Maternity harassment, known in English as pregnancy discrimination, remains prevalent in developed countries. However, research examining the mental health effects of maternity harassment is lacking. We aimed to examine the association between maternity harassment and depression during pregnancy in Japan. METHODS: A cross-sectional Internet survey was conducted on 359 pregnant employees (including women who were working at the time their pregnancy was confirmed) from May 22 to May 31, 2020, during which time a COVID-19 state of emergency was declared. Maternity harassment was defined as being subjected to any of the 16 adverse treatments prohibited by national guidelines. Depression was defined as a score of ≥9 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (Japanese version). Logistic regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: Overall, 24.8% of the pregnant employees had experienced maternity harassment by supervisors and/or colleagues. After adjusting for demographics, pregnancy status, work status, and fear of COVID-19, pregnant employees who experienced maternity harassment were more likely to have depression than those who did not (odds ratio 2.48, 95% confidential interval 1.34-4.60). This association was not influenced by whether they were teleworking or not as a COVID-19 measure. CONCLUSIONS: One quarter of pregnant employees experienced maternity harassment and had a higher prevalence of depression than those who did not. Being physically away from the office through teleworking may not reduce the effect of maternal harassment on depression. To protect the mental health and employment of pregnant women, employers should comply with the laws and take measures to prevent maternity harassment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Depression/complications , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Pregnancy/psychology , Prejudice/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Employment/psychology , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Prejudice/statistics & numerical data , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
J Subst Abuse Treat ; 122: 108200, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-926967

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This article presents a brief overview of the challenges and facilitators to the provision of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment for pregnant and parenting women during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specifically, we highlight the deployment of telepsychology services during the pandemic by an integrated, trainee-based women & addictions program that provides care via a multidisciplinary team, including an obstetrician, addiction medicine fellow, nurse, behavioral health trainees, violence prevention advocates, and pediatric provider. METHODS: We outline unique adaptations that the program made to shift from in-person psychology trainee services to telepsychology. Additionally, we describe supporting factors and barriers to success for continued treatment planning, service provision, and educational training. RESULTS: The program identified and addressed numerous opportunities for improvement to implement and continue telepsychology within an integrated women & addictions program during the COVID-19 pandemic. The program maintained the unique components of care integration with the proliferation of digital resources for patients and providers, as well as the flexibility of attending physicians and supervising psychologists. CONCLUSIONS: Provision of telepsychology services within an integrated women & addictions program employing trainees is crucial during the COVID-19 pandemic. The program addressed barriers to care in creative ways, through the use of various technologies, to meet patients where they are. Continuing to have this option available requires adaptation to the maturing needs of the clinic.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Postpartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy/psychology , Psychotherapists , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy , Women , Adult , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Female , Humans , Outpatients , Psychotherapists/education , Telemedicine , United States
14.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(9): e22002, 2020 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732939

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 global pandemic has impacted the whole of society, requiring rapid implementation of individual-, population-, and system-level public health responses to contain and reduce the spread of infection. Women in the perinatal period (pregnant, birthing, and postpartum) have unique and timely needs for directives on health, safety, and risk aversion during periods of isolation and physical distancing for themselves, their child or children, and other family members. In addition, they are a vulnerable group at increased risk of psychological distress that may be exacerbated in the context of social support deprivation and a high-risk external environment. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to examine the public discourse of a perinatal cohort to understand unmet health information and support needs, and the impacts on mothering identity and social dynamics in the context of COVID-19. METHODS: A leading Australian online support forum for women pre- through to postbirth was used to interrogate all posts related to COVID-19 from January 27 to May 12, 2020, inclusive. Key search terms included "COVID," "corona," and "pandemic." A three-phase analysis was conducted, including thematic analysis, sentiment analysis, and word frequency calculations. RESULTS: The search yielded 960 posts, of which 831 were included in our analysis. The qualitative thematic analysis demonstrated reasonable understanding, interpretation, and application of relevant restrictions in place, with five emerging themes identified. These were (1) heightened distress related to a high-risk external environment; (2) despair and anticipatory grief due to deprivation of social and family support, and bonding rituals; (3) altered family and support relationships; (4) guilt-tampered happiness; and (5) family future postponed. Sentiment analysis revealed that the content was predominantly negative (very negative: n=537 and moderately negative: n=443 compared to very positive: n=236 and moderately positive: n=340). Negative words were frequently used in the 831 posts with associated derivatives including "worried" (n=165, 19.9%), "risk" (n=143, 17.2%), "anxiety" (n=98, 11.8%), "concerns" (n=74, 8.8%), and "stress" (n=69, 8.3%). CONCLUSIONS: Women in the perinatal period are uniquely impacted by the current pandemic. General information on COVID-19 safe behaviors did not meet the particular needs of this cohort. The lack of nuanced and timely information may exacerbate the risk of psychological and psychosocial distress in this vulnerable, high-risk group. State and federal public health departments need to provide a central repository of information that is targeted, consistent, accessible, timely, and reassuring. Compensatory social and emotional support should be considered, using alternative measures to mitigate the risk of mental health disorders in this cohort.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Internet , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Mothers/psychology , Parenting/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parturition/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/psychology , Social Support
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