Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 411
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Scand J Public Health ; 49(7): 721-729, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636188

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Maternal mental distress in pregnancy can be damaging to the mother's and child's physical and mental health. This study aimed to provide an insight into mental well-being of pregnant women in Denmark during COVID-19 by assessing symptoms of depression and anxiety. METHODS: Data from two cohorts of pregnant women recruited from Danish general practice were compared. A COVID-19 lockdown cohort (N=330) completed questionnaires between 8 April and 6 May. Responses were compared to those from a control cohort of women from 2016 (N=1428). Mental well-being was measured with the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and the Anxiety Symptom Scale (ASS). RESULTS: Questionnaires were returned by 83% of the COVID-19 lockdown cohort and by 93% of the control cohort. Multivariable analysis controlling for age, cohabitation status, occupation, smoking, alcohol use, chronic disease, fertility treatment, parity and children living at home showed no difference in depressive symptoms (MDI). Anxiety symptoms (ASS) were slightly worse in the COVID-19 lockdown cohort (mean difference=1.4 points), mainly driven by questions concerning general anxiety. The largest differences in anxiety were seen in first trimester (adjusted mean difference=4.0 points). CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women questioned during the COVID-19 pandemic showed no change in symptoms of depression and only a modest elevation of anxiety when compared to pregnant women questioned during a non-pandemic period in 2016.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnant Women , Anxiety/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Denmark/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological
2.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 33, 2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637845

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 vaccines are advised for pregnant women in the United Kingdom (UK) however COVID-19 vaccine uptake among pregnant women is inadequate. METHODS: An online survey and semi-structured interviews were used to investigate pregnant women's views on COVID-19 vaccine acceptability for themselves when pregnant, not pregnant and for their babies. One thousand one hundred eighty-one women, aged over 16 years, who had been pregnant since 23rd March 2020, were surveyed between 3rd August-11th October 2020. Ten women were interviewed. RESULTS: The majority of women surveyed (81.2%) reported that they would 'definitely' or were 'leaning towards' accepting a COVID-19 vaccine when not pregnant. COVID-19 vaccine acceptance was significantly lower during pregnancy (62.1%, p < 0.005) and for their babies (69.9%, p < 0.005). Ethnic minority women were twice as likely to reject a COVID-19 vaccine for themselves when not pregnant, pregnant and for their babies compared to women from White ethnic groups (p < 0.005). Women from lower-income households, aged under 25-years, and from some geographic regions were more likely to reject a COVID-19 vaccine when not pregnant, pregnant and for their babies. Multivariate analysis revealed that income and ethnicity were the main drivers of the observed age and regional differences. Women unvaccinated against pertussis in pregnancy were over four times more likely to reject COVID-19 vaccines when not pregnant, pregnant and for their babies. Thematic analysis of the survey freetext responses and interviews found safety concerns about COVID-19 vaccines were common though wider mistrust in vaccines was also expressed. Trust in vaccines and the health system were also reasons women gave for accepting COVID-19 vaccines. CONCLUSION: Safety information on COVID-19 vaccines must be clearly communicated to pregnant women to provide reassurance and facilitate informed pregnancy vaccine decisions. Targeted interventions to promote COVID-19 vaccine uptake among ethnic minority and lower-income women may be needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , /statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Income , Mothers/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(1)2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625822

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 global pandemic dictated rapid change to outpatient services within our London-based maternity hospital. Coupled with long waiting times in the Consultant-led Antenatal clinic, we aimed to reduce hospital footfall and unnecessary contact with a clinically vulnerable patient population by reducing face-to-face consultations. Numerous specialties have already successfully implemented safe and effective teleconferencing, allowing remote review while reducing the risks posed by face-to-face contact. A target to see at least 15% of women remotely was set to reduce footfall in the Consultant-led Antenatal Clinic. We aimed to reduce face-to-face waiting times to a mean of 30 min. In March 2020, clinics were prevetted by the clinic consultant to carefully select appropriate women suitable for video or telephone consultations. Clinic templates were changed, increasing appointment times by 5-25 min each. 'AccuRx' software was tested and used to communicate appointment details and conduct the consultation. In-person waiting times in the clinic and number of virtual consultations over a 3-month period was recorded, along with qualitative feedback from service users and staff through surveys and departmental meetings. Mean waiting times were reduced by 33% from 45-30 min and multiple service-user benefits were noted, including partner involvement, convenience of waiting for appointments at home and removing requirement for childcare. However, limitations of internet connectivity, need for time to prevet clinics and lack of a robust administration system to inform women of their appointment type were highlighted. Further work is required in these areas to ensure sustainability and improvement of this process for the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consultants , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2
6.
BMC Res Notes ; 15(1): 3, 2022 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607105

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study the change in trend of antenatal mental health and associated factors among a cohort of pregnant women during the second wave of COVID-19 using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Previous study using the same scale, during the first wave reported a higher prevalence of anxiety and depression. RESULTS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out at the two large maternity hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka: Castle Street Hospital for Women (CSHW) and De Soysa Hospital for Women (DSHW). Consecutively recruited 311 women were studied. Out of which, 272 (87.5%) were having uncomplicated pregnancies at the time of the survey and 106 (34.1%) were either anxious, depressed, or both. Prevalence of anxiety was 17.0% and depression 27.0%. Overall, continuing COVID-19 pandemic increased antenatal anxiety and depression. The trend was to aggravate depression more intensively compared to anxiety in this cohort of women studied. Special support is needed for pregnant mothers during infectious epidemics taking more attention to antenatal depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnant Women , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sri Lanka/epidemiology
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580719

ABSTRACT

Pregnant and lactating women (PLW) represent a particular population subset with increased susceptibility for COVID-19 morbidity and mortality, even though the evidence about the safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines was delayed due to their initial exclusion from development trials. This unclear situation could have led to increased COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy levels among PLW; therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the attitudes of Czech PLW towards COVID-19 vaccines and the determinants of their attitudes. An analytical cross-sectional survey-based study was carried out in the University Hospital Brno (South Moravia, Czechia) between August and October 2021. The study utilised a self-administered questionnaire (SAQ) adapted from previous instruments used for the same purpose. The SAQ included closed-ended items covering demographic characteristics, clinical and obstetric characteristics, attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination, and potential psychosocial predictors of vaccine acceptance. Out of the 362 included participants, 278 were pregnant (PW) and 84 were lactating women (LW). The overall COVID-19 vaccine acceptance (immediate and delayed) level was substantially high (70.2%), with a significant difference between PW (76.6%) and LW (48.8%). Out of the 70.2% who agreed to receive the vaccine, 3.6% indicated immediate acceptance, and 66.6% indicated delayed acceptance. Only 13.3% of the participants indicated their acceptance of their physician's vaccination recommendation during pregnancy or while lactating, and 62.2% were against it. Our results agreed with the recent studies that revealed that PW tended to have a high level of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance, and they were also inclined to resist professional recommendations because they predominantly preferred to delay their vaccination. The pregnancy trimester, education level, employment status, and previous live births were significant determinants for COVID-19 vaccine acceptance. The most commonly preferred vaccine type was mRNA-based vaccines, followed by viral vector-based and inactivated virus vaccines. The first top priority of PLW was vaccine safety for their children, followed by vaccine safety for the PLW and vaccine effectiveness. Regarding psychosocial predictors, media/social media, trust in the government, the pharmaceutical industry, and healthcare professionals, partners, and a positive risk-benefit ratio were significant promoters for COVID-19 vaccine acceptance. Findings from this study suggest that promotional interventions targeting PLW should use web platforms and focus on vaccine safety evidence, the expected benefits of vaccines and potential harms of the infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Czech Republic , Female , Humans , Lactation , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
8.
Gac Sanit ; 35 Suppl 2: S588-S590, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587739

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that cause disease in humans and animals. In humans, it usually causes respiratory infections, from the common cold to serious illnesses such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The disease is mainly spread between people through respiratory droplets from coughs and sneezes. This virus can last up to three days with plastic and stainless steel SARS CoV-2 can last up to three days, or in aerosols for 3h. METHOD: The methodology of this research is indirect observation. Existing data analyzed with a preventive intervention approach and then described with a qualitative descriptive method. RESULT: Based on research that has been carried out, infection with the COVID-19 virus in pregnant women can not only cause severe symptoms in the mother, but also poses a risk of harm to the baby they are carrying. Therefore, preventive measures need to be taken so that pregnant women are not easily infected with the Corona virus. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is a new disease that has become a pandemic. This disease should be watched out for because transmission is relatively fast, has a mortality rate that cannot be ignored, and there is no definitive therapy. There are still many knowledge gaps in this field, so further studies are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Rev Bras Ginecol Obstet ; 43(12): 949-960, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585700

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and obstetric aspects of pregnant women with COVID-19. METHODS: A systematic literature review in the MEDLINE/PubMed, LILACS, SCIELO, and CNKI databases was performed from March to May 2020, with the descriptors: Pregnancy; 2019-nCov; Coronavirus; SARS-Cov-2, Covid-19. Of those chosen were original titles, without language and period restriction and that addressed pregnant women with a clinical and/or laboratory diagnosis of COVID-19. Revisions, editorials, and duplicate titles were excluded. The Newcastle-Ottawa (NOS) and Murad et al. scales were used to assess the quality of the studies. RESULTS: We included 34 articles with 412 pregnant women infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-Cov-2), with an average age of 27.5 years of age and 36.0 gestational weeks. The most common symptom was fever (205 [49.7%]), and 89 (21.6%) pregnant women progressed to severe viral pneumonia. Laboratory tests showed an increase in C-reactive protein (154 [37.8%]), and radiological tests showed pneumonia with peripheral ground-glass pattern (172 [51.4%]). Emergency cesarean delivery was indicated for most pregnant women, and the most common gestational complication was premature rupture of ovarian membranes (14 [3.4%;]). We detected 2 (0.5%) neonatal deaths, 2 (0.5%) stillbirths, and 1 (0.2%) maternal death. CONCLUSION: Pregnant women with COVID-19 presented a clinical picture similar to that of non-infected pregnant women, with few obstetric or neonatal repercussions. There was a greater indication of cesarean deliveries before the disease aggravated, and there was no evidence of vertical transmission of the infection.


OBJETIVO: Analisar os aspectos clínicos e obstétricos de gestantes com COVID-19. MéTODOS: Revisão sistemática da literatura nas bases: MEDLINE/PubMed, LILACS, SCIELO e CNKI, realizada de março a maio de 2020, com os descritores Pregnancy; 2019-nCov; Coronavirus; SARS-Cov-2, Covid-19. Elegeram-se títulos originais, sem restrição de idioma e período e que abordassem gestantes com diagnóstico clínico e/ou laboratorial de COVID-19. Excluíram-se revisões, editoriais, títulos duplicados. As escalas de Newcastle-Ottawa (NOS, na sigla em inglês) e a de Murad et al. foram utilizadas para avaliar a qualidade dos estudos. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 34 artigos com 412 gestantes infectadas pela síndrome respiratória aguda grave (SARS-Cov, na sigla em inglês) com idade média de 27,5 anos e média de 36,0 semanas gestacionais. O sintoma mais incidente foi a febre (49,7%;205). e 89 (21,6%) gestantes evoluíram para pneumonia viral grave. Os exames laboratoriais demonstraram aumento da proteína C reativa (37,8%; 154) e os radiológicos mostraram pneumonia com padrão em vidro fosco periférico (51,4%; 172). O parto cesáreo de emergência foi indicado para a maior parte das gestantes, e a complicação gestacional mais comum foi a ruptura prematura de membranas ovulares (3,4%; 14). Foram detectados 2 (0,5%) mortes neonatais, 2 (0,5%) natimortos, e 1 (0,2%) morte materna. CONCLUSãO: Gestantes com doença coronavírus (COVID-19, na sigla em inglês apresentaram quadro clínico semelhante a gestantes não infectadas, com poucas repercussões obstétricas ou neonatais. Houve uma maior indicação de partos cesáreos antes do agravamento da doença e não se observaram evidências de transmissão vertical da infecção.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Rev Bras Ginecol Obstet ; 43(12): 932-939, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585681

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study maternal anxiety in pregnant women without comorbidities in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak in Brazil and to study maternal knowledge and concerns about the pandemic. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis from a national multicenter cross-sectional study performed in 10 cities, from June to August, 2020, in Brazil. Interviewed postpartum women, without medical or obstetrical comorbidities, were included in the present subanalysis. A structured questionnaire and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) were applied. RESULTS: Out of the 1,662 women, 763 (45.9%) met the criteria for the current analysis and 16.1% presented with moderate and 11.5% with severe maternal anxiety. Moderate or severe maternal anxiety was associated with high school education (odds ratio [OR]:1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.04-2.40). The protective factor was cohabiting with a partner (OR: 0.46; 95%CI: 0.29-0.73). There was a positive correlation between the total BAI score and receiving information about care in the pandemic (rpartial 0.15; p < 0.001); concern about vertical transmission of COVID-19 (rpartial 0.10; p = 0.01); receiving information about breastfeeding (rpartial 0.08; p = 0.03); concerns about prenatal care (rpartial 0.10; p = 0.01), and concerns about the baby contracting COVID-19 (rpartial 0.11; p = 0.004). The correlation was negative in the following aspects: self-confidence in protecting from COVID-19 (rpartial 0.08; p = 0.04), having learned (rpartial 0.09; p = 0.01) and self-confidence in breastfeeding (rpartial 0.22; p < 0.001) in the context of the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The anxiety of pregnant women without medical or obstetrical comorbidities was associated to high school educational level and not living with a partner during the COVID-19 pandemic. Self-confidence in protecting against COVID-19 and knowledge about breastfeeding care during the pandemic reduced maternal anxiety.


OBJETIVO: Estudar a ansiedade materna em gestantes sem comorbidades no contexto do surto de COVID-19 no Brasil e estudar o conhecimento e as preocupações maternas sobre a pandemia. MéTODOS: Trata-se de análise secundária de um estudo transversal multicêntrico nacional realizado em 10 cidades, de junho a agosto de 2020, no Brasil. Mulheres no pós-parto entrevistadas, sem comorbidades médicas ou obstétricas, foram incluídas nesta subanálise. Foram aplicados um questionário estruturado e o Inventário de Ansiedade de Beck (BAI, na sigla em inglês). RESULTADOS: Das 1.662 mulheres, 763 (45,9%) atenderam aos critérios da análise atual e 16,1% apresentaram ansiedade materna moderada e 11,5% ansiedade materna grave. A ansiedade materna moderada ou grave foi associada à escolaridade no ensino médio (odds ratio [OR]: 1,58; intervalo de confiança [IC] 95%: 1,04­2,40). O fator protetor foi coabitar com companheiro (OR: 0,46; IC95%: 0,29­0,73). Houve correlação positiva entre a pontuação total do BAI e o recebimento de informações sobre cuidados na pandemia (rparcial 0,15; p < 0,001); preocupação com a transmissão vertical de COVID-19 (rparcial 0,10; p = 0,01); receber informações sobre amamentação (rparcial 0,08; p = 0,03); preocupações sobre cuidados pré-natais (rparcial 0,10; p = 0,01) e preocupações sobre o bebê contrair COVID-19 (rparcial 0,11; p = 0,004). A correlação foi negativa com os seguintes aspectos: ter autoconfiança para se proteger (rparcial 0,08; p = 0,04), aprender (rparcial 0,09; p = 0,01) e ter autoconfiança para amamentar (rparcial 0,22; p < 0,001) no contexto da pandemia. CONCLUSãO: A ansiedade de gestantes sem comorbidades médicas ou obstétricas esteve associada à escolaridade no ensino médio e não morar com companheiro durante a pandemia de COVID-19. A autoconfiança na proteção contra COVID-19 e o conhecimento sobre os cuidados com a amamentação durante a pandemia reduziram a ansiedade materna.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnant Women , Anxiety/epidemiology , Brazil/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(5): 1-16, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574630

ABSTRACT

In a large-scale study, 128176 non-pregnant patients (228 studies) and 10000 pregnant patients (121 studies) confirmed COVID-19 cases included in this Meta-Analysis. The mean (confidence interval [CI]) of age and gestational age of admission (GA) in pregnant women was 33 (28-37) years old and 36 (34-37) weeks, respectively. Pregnant women show the same manifestations of COVID-19 as non-pregnant adult patients. Fever (pregnant: 75.5%; non-pregnant: 74%) and cough (pregnant: 48.5%; non-pregnant: 53.5%) are the most common symptoms in both groups followed by myalgia (26.5%) and chill (25%) in pregnant and dysgeusia (27%) and fatigue (26.5%) in non-pregnant patients. Pregnant women are less probable to show cough (odds ratio [OR] 0.7; 95% CI 0.67-0.75), fatigue (OR: 0.58; CI: 0.54-0.61), sore throat (OR: 0.66; CI: 0.61-0.7), headache (OR: 0.55; CI: 0.55-0.58) and diarrhea (OR: 0.46; CI: 0.4-0.51) than non-pregnant adult patients. The most common imaging found in pregnant women is ground-glass opacity (57%) and in non-pregnant patients is consolidation (76%). Pregnant women have higher proportion of leukocytosis (27% vs. 14%), thrombocytopenia (18% vs. 12.5%) and have lower proportion of raised C-reactive protein (52% vs. 81%) compared with non-pregnant patients. Leucopenia and lymphopenia are almost the same in both groups. The most common comorbidity in pregnant patients is diabetes (18%) and in non-pregnant patients is hypertension (21%). Case fatality rate (CFR) of non-pregnant hospitalized patients is 6.4% (4.4-8.5), and mortality due to all-cause for pregnant patients is 11.3% (9.6-13.3). Regarding the complications of pregnancy, postpartum hemorrhage (54.5% [7-94]), caesarean delivery (48% [42-54]), preterm labor (25% [4-74]) and preterm birth (21% [12-34]) are in turn the most prevalent complications. Comparing the pregnancy outcomes show that caesarean delivery (OR: 3; CI: 2-5), low birth weight (LBW) (OR: 9; CI: 2.4-30) and preterm birth (OR: 2.5; CI: 1.5-3.5) are more probable in pregnant woman with COVID-19 than pregnant women without COVID-19. The most prevalent neonatal complications are neonatal intensive care unit admission (43% [2-96]), fetal distress (30% [12-58]) and LBW (25% [16-37]). The rate of vertical transmission is 5.3% (1.3-16), and the rate of positive SARS-CoV-2 test for neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 is 8% (4-16). Overall, pregnant patients present with the similar clinical characteristics of COVID-19 when compared with the general population, but they may be more asymptomatic. Higher odds of caesarean delivery, LBW and preterm birth among pregnant patients with COVID-19 suggest a possible association between COVID-19 infection and pregnancy complications. Low risk of vertical transmission is present, and SARS-CoV-2 can be detected in all conception products, particularly placenta and breast milk. Interpretations of these results should be done cautiously due to the heterogeneity between studies; however, we believe our findings can guide the prenatal and postnatal considerations for COVID-19 pregnant patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnant Women , Premature Birth , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
13.
Infect Dis Now ; 51(5): 435-439, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574384

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the world. Given the sharply increased infection rate, the number of pregnant women and children with COVID-19 is correspondingly on the rise. SARS-CoV-2 infection is transmitted through droplets; though hypothesized, other transmission routes have not been confirmed. As of now, it remains unclear whether and how SARS-CoV-2 can possibly be transmitted from the mother to the fetus. Method: This study examines the medical records of 30 neonates born to women with COVID-19, the objective being to provide documented information on maternal-child transmission and infant outcomes. Results: Out of the 30 newborns, 28 had negative PCR test results for SARS-CoV-2; among their mothers, fifteen had fever, nine had cough and twenty had delivered by cesarean section. The median birth term was 37wk2dy, and twenty of the neonates were male. Most of them were asymptomatic, except for the three who presented with shortness of breath. Two of them were intubated and both died, the first because of severe sepsis and the second due to severe hyaline membrane disease. As regards the two infected neonates, the first represents a probable case of congenital SARS-CoV-2 infection, which appears unlikely in the second case. The outcome for both of them was good, without any complications. Conclusion: Maternal-fetal transmission of the SARS- CoV-2 virus was not detected in the majority of the reported cases, although two of 30 neonates had positive qRT-PCR test results. Our study supports the hypothesis that though it seldom actually occurs, in utero SARS-CoV-2 vertical transmission is possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Mothers , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572467

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is the largest pandemic of an aggressive coronavirus in the human population in the 21st century. The pandemic may have a negative emotional impact on pregnant women, causing fear and stress. Negative feelings during pregnancy later affect fear of childbirth. Our study aimed to determine the relationship between fear of COVID-19, stress and fear of childbirth. We assume that fear of COVID-19 will be a mediator of the relationship between perceived stress and fear of childbirth. A total of 262 Polish pregnant women participated in this study. Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FOC-6) and Labour Anxiety Questionnaire (KLP II) were used in the study. There was a statistically significant, moderate, and positive relationship between perceived stress, fear of COVID-19, and fear of childbirth. Fear of COVID-19 was a statistically significant mediator in the relationship between perceived stress and fear of childbirth. The COVID-19 epidemic may have a negative emotional impact on pregnant women, causing fear, stress and increased fear of childbirth. Childbirth during the COVID-19 pandemic is perceived by women as a threat to their well-being and health. Therefore, it is especially important to support a woman in the perinatal period and to enable her to give birth to a child.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnant Women , Child , Fear , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Parturition , Poland/epidemiology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
J Med Case Rep ; 15(1): 606, 2021 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In this report, we describe a very challenging case of a patient with secondary Evans syndrome caused by severe coronavirus disease 2019 infection in a pregnant full-term woman. CASE PRESENTATION: A 29-year-old full-term pregnant Indonesian woman presented with gross hematuria, dry cough, fever, dyspnea, nausea, anosmia, and fatigue 5 days after confirmation of coronavirus disease 2019 infection. Laboratory examinations showed very severe thrombocytopenia, increased indirect bilirubin, and a positive direct Coombs' test. From peripheral blood, there was an increased number of spherocytes, which indicated an autoimmune hemolytic process. Antinuclear antibody and anti-double-stranded DNA test results were negative, and her virology serological markers are also negative for human immunodeficiency virus, cytomegalovirus, and hepatitis B and C. Despite aggressive treatment with platelet transfusion, high-dose steroid, and thrombopoietin receptor agonists, the platelet count did not recover, and a speculative cesarean delivery had to be done with a very low platelet count.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombocytopenia , Adult , Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombocytopenia/etiology
17.
J Med Case Rep ; 15(1): 588, 2021 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571928

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is the third member of the coronavirus family to cause global concern in the twenty-first century. Pregnant women are particularly at higher risk of developing severe viral pneumonia, possibly because of a partial immune suppression during their pregnancy. Under such critical and rapidly evolving circumstances, these poor findings might be helpful for the treatment of infected pregnant women with the 2019 novel coronavirus. CASE PRESENTATION: In this study, we report the case of a 33-year-old Asian pregnant woman at 25 gestational weeks with coronavirus disease 2019 who developed severe complications, including hypoxemia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary infiltration, and bilateral pleural effusion. She died 1 month after admission to the hospital. CONCLUSION: Pregnant populations are especially at higher risk of viral pneumonia development caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Further research on the prevention and treatment of the new coronavirus is necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Adult , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6788-6793, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562395

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to report a case of mild novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in a pregnant woman with probable viremia, as reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing of endometrial and placental swabs for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was positive. A 26-year-old multigravida at 35 weeks 2 days of gestation, who had extensive thigh and abdominal cellulitis, tested SARS-CoV-2 positive by RT-PCR performed on samples from the endometrium and maternal side of the placenta. However, other samples (amniotic fluid, fetal side of the placenta, umbilical cord, maternal vagina, and neonatal nasopharynx) tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. This is one of the rare reports of probable SARS-CoV-2 viremia with the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the endometrium and placenta, but not leading to vertical transmission and neonatal infection. Because knowledge about transplacental transmission and results is very limited, we conclude that more RT-PCR tests on placental and cord blood samples are needed in order to safely make definite conclusions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Fetus/virology , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viremia/virology , Adult , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women
19.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 155(3): 524-531, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562319

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the outcomes of adolescent versus adult women during pregnancy and puerperium admitted to a dedicated intensive care unit (ICU) in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort study, we retrieved data from the medical charts of 557 adolescent (<20 years) and adult (≥20 years) women. The association between demographic and clinical variables and the outcomes were compared in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The maternal severity index (MSI) of adult women was significantly higher than in adolescents. In univariate log-binomial regression analysis, pneumothorax and circulatory dysfunction were positively associated with the composite primary outcome of death or transfer (for more complex care), whereas eclampsia was negatively associated. Being an adolescent was not associated with this outcome, not even when adjusting for potential confounders. Conversely, being an adolescent was associated with fewer complications (secondary outcome) even after adjusting for potential confounders (type of admission, eclampsia, pre-eclampsia, surgical site infection, abdominal hemorrhage, drug abuse, metabolic syndrome, malnutrition, pneumothorax, or circulatory dysfunction). CONCLUSION: In Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, adult women admitted to the ICU because of gestational or birth complications had worse outcomes compared with adolescents.


Subject(s)
Eclampsia , Intensive Care Units , Adolescent , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , Eclampsia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Retrospective Studies
20.
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol ; 268: 144-164, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561999

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 vaccine has been recommended to pregnant women, but survey studies showed contrasting findings worldwide in relation to the willingness to accept vaccination during pregnancy. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the evidence from the literature regarding the acceptance rate of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in pregnant and breastfeeding women. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a systematic review on the main databases (MEDLINE (PubMed), Scopus, ISI Web of Science) searching for all the peer-reviewed survey studies analyzing the eventual acceptance rate of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine among pregnant and breastfeeding women. To combine data meta-analyses of proportions and pooled proportions with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. RESULTS: 15 studies including 25,839 women were included in the analysis. The proportion of women actually willing to be vaccinated during pregnancy is 49.1% (95% CI, 42.3-56.0), and the proportion of breastfeeding women is 61.6% (95% CI, 50.0-75.0). CONCLUSION: The cumulative SARS-CoV-2 vaccine acceptance rate among pregnant women appears still low. Vaccinal campaign are urgently needed to drive more confidence into the vaccine to help reducing the spread of the infection and the possible consequences during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...