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BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 779, 2022 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1885311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Maternal vaccinations for influenza and pertussis are recommended in New Zealand to protect mothers and their infant from infection. However, maternal immunisation coverage in New Zealand is suboptimal. Furthermore, there is unacceptable inequitable maternal immunisation rates across the country with Maori and Pacific women having significantly lower maternal immunisation rates than those of other New Zealanders. METHODS: This research set out to explore what pregnant/recently pregnant Maori and Pacific women knew about immunisation during pregnancy and what factors influenced their decision to be vaccinated. A semi-structured interview guide was developed with questions focusing on knowledge of pertussis and influenza vaccination during pregnancy and decision-making. Maori and Pacific women aged over 16 years were purposively sampled and interviewed in Dunedin and Gisborne, New Zealand between May and August 2021. Interviews were analysed following a directed qualitative content approach. Data were arranged into coding nodes based on the study aims (deductive analysis) informed by previous literature and within these participant experiences were inductively coded into themes and subthemes. RESULTS: Not all women were aware of maternal vaccine recommendations or they diseases they protected against. Many underestimated how dangerous influenza and pertussis could be and some were more concerned about potential harms of the vaccine. Furthermore, understanding potential harms of infection and protection provided by vaccination did not necessarily mean women would choose to be vaccinated. Those who decided to vaccinate felt well-informed, had vaccination recommended by their healthcare provider, and did so to protect their and their infant's health. Those who decided against vaccination were concerned about safety of the vaccines, lacked the information they needed, were not offered the vaccine, or did not consider vaccination a priority. CONCLUSIONS: There is a lack of understanding about vaccine benefits and risks of vaccine-preventable diseases which can result in the reinforcement of negative influences such as the fear of side effects. Furthermore, if vaccine benefits are not understood, inaccessibility of vaccines and the precedence of other life priorities may prevent uptake. Being well-informed and supported to make positive decisions to vaccinate in pregnancy is likely to improve vaccine coverage in Maori and Pacific Island New Zealanders.


Subject(s)
Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Whooping Cough , Female , Humans , Immunization , Infant , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Mothers , New Zealand , Pertussis Vaccine/therapeutic use , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnant Women , Vaccination , Whooping Cough/prevention & control
3.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 22(1): 179, 2022 06 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139145

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neuraxial blocks is the recommended mode of analgesia and anesthesia in parturients with Coronavirus 19 (COVID-19). There is limited data on the hemodynamic responses to neuraxial blocks in COVID-19 patients. We aim to compare the hemodynamic responses to neuraxial blocks in COVID-19 positive and propensity-matched COVID-19 negative parturients. METHODS: We conducted retrospective, cross-sectional case-control study of hemodynamic changes associated with neuraxial blocks in COVID-19 positive parturients in a Tertiary care academic medical center. Fifty-one COVID-19 positive women confirmed by nasopharyngeal reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), were compared with propensity-matched COVID negative controls (n = 51). Hemodynamic changes after neuraxial block were recorded by electronic medical recording system and analyzed using paired and unpaired T- test and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney Rank Sum tests. The primary outcome was ≥ 20% change in MAP and HR after neuraxial block placement. RESULTS: In the epidural group, 7% COVID-19 positive parturients had > 20% decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) from baseline compared to 15% COVID-19 negative parturients (P = 0.66). In the spinal group, 83% of COVID-19 positive parturients had a decrease in MAP more than 20% from baseline compared to 71% in control (P = 0.49). MAP drop of more than 40% occurred in 29% COVID positive parturients in the spinal group versus 17% in COVID-19 negative parturients (P = 0.5465). In COVID-19 positive spinal group, 54% required vasopressors whereas 38% in COVID-19 negative spinal group required vasopressors (P = 0.387). We found a significant correlation between body mass index (BMI) > 30 and hypotension in COVID ( +) parturient with odds ratio (8.63; 95% CI-1.93 - 37.21) (P = 0.007). CONCLUSION: Incidence and severity of hypotension after neuraxial blocks were similar between COVID-19 positive and COVID-19 negative parturients. BMI > 30 was a significant risk factor for hypotension as described in preexisting literature, this correlation was seen in COVID-19 positive parturients. The likely reason for parturients with BMI > 30 in COVID negative patients not showing similar correlation, is that the sample size was small.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Obstetrical , Anesthesia, Spinal , COVID-19 , Hypotension , Case-Control Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hemodynamics , Humans , Hypotension/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Retrospective Studies
5.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(1): e25241, 2021 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141298

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in changes to normal life and disrupted social and economic function worldwide. However, little is known about the impact of social media use, unhealthy lifestyles, and the risk of miscarriage among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the association between social media use, unhealthy lifestyles, and the risk of miscarriage among pregnant women in the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic in China. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, 456 singleton pregnant women in mainland China were recruited during January and February 2020. Sociodemographic characteristics, history of previous health, social media use, and current lifestyles were collected at baseline, and we followed up about the occurrence of miscarriage. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate the risk ratios (RRs) of miscarriage for women with different exposures to COVID-19-specific information. RESULTS: Among all the 456 pregnant women, there were 82 (18.0%) who did no physical activities, 82 (18.0%) with inadequate dietary diversity, 174 (38.2%) with poor sleep quality, and 54 (11.8%) spending >3 hours on reading COVID-19 news per day. Women with excessive media use (>3 hours) were more likely to be previously pregnant (P=.03), have no physical activity (P=.003), have inadequate dietary diversity (P=.03), and have poor sleep quality (P<.001). The prevalence of miscarriage was 16.0% (n=73; 95% CI 12.6%-19.4%). Compared with women who spent 0.5-2 hours (25/247, 10.1%) on reading COVID-19 news per day, miscarriage prevalence in women who spent <0.5 hours (5/23, 21.7%), 2-3 hours (26/132, 19.7%), and >3 hours (17/54, 31.5%) was higher (P<.001). Miscarriage prevalence was also higher in pregnant women with poor sleep quality (39/174, 22.4% vs 34/282, 12.1%; P=.003) and a high education level (66/368, 17.9% vs 7/88, 8.0%; P=.02). In the multivariable model, poor sleep quality (adjusted RR 2.06, 95% CI 1.24-3.44; P=.006), 2-3 hours of media use daily (adjusted RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.02-2.97; P=.04), and >3 hours of media use daily (adjusted RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.43-4.59; P=.002) were associated with miscarriage. In the sensitivity analysis, results were still stable. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women with excessive media use were more likely to have no physical activity, inadequate dietary diversity, and poor sleep quality. Excessive media use and poor sleep quality were associated with a higher risk of miscarriage. Our findings highlight the importance of healthy lifestyles during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous/etiology , Life Style , Pregnant Women/psychology , Social Media/trends , Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , Abortion, Spontaneous/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Social Media/statistics & numerical data
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116134

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Elevated serum levels of sFlt-1 were found in non-pregnant severe COVID-19 patients. The aim was to investigate sFlt-1/PlGF ratio as a predictor of severe disease and adverse outcome in pregnant women with COVID-19. METHODS: A single-center case-control study was conducted in pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection. SARS-CoV-2-negative pregnant women served as controls. Serum sFlt-1/PlGF ratio was assessed. The primary outcome was severe COVID-19 and the secondary outcome comprised adverse outcomes including severe COVID-19, intensive care unit admission, maternal multiple organ failure, preterm delivery, fetal demise, preeclampsia or hypertension diagnosed after COVID-19, maternal death. RESULTS: 138 women with SARS-CoV-2 infection and 140 controls were included. sFlt-1/PlGF ratio was higher in infected patients (11.2 vs. 24; p < 0.01) and in women with severe disease (50.8 vs. 16.2; p < 0.01). However, it was similar in women with adverse and non-adverse outcome (29.8 vs. 20; p = 0.2). The AUC of sFlt-1/PlGF ratio was 0.66 (95% CI 0.56-0.76) for the prediction of severe COVID-19, and 0.72 (95% CI 0.63-0.79) for the prediction of adverse outcome. CONCLUSIONS: sFlt-1 and sFlt-1/PlGF ratio are related to SARS-CoV-2 infection and the severity of COVID-19 during pregnancy. However, sFlt-1/PlGF ratio is not a good predictor of severe COVID-19 or adverse outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infant, Newborn , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 , Case-Control Studies , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
7.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277501, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2112668

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to develop and examine the effects of an internet-based intervention program on environmental perception and behavior among Korean pregnant women based on revised protection motivation theory. METHOD: This study was a non-equivalent control group pre-post-test design. The experimental program consisted of prenatal education, reduction of fine dust, birth education, environmental health promotion, and postnatal management education using zoom video conferences. The face-to-face interventions were provided through regular prenatal classes at public health services for the control group. The total participant was 49 pregnant women: 25 in the experimental group and 24 in the control group. The program adaptation was conducted between April 2021 and November 2021 in Korea. The data were analyzed by ANCOVA and t-test to examine the effects using SPSS 26.0 program. RESULTS: After intervention of the program, environmental severity (F = 17.96, p < .001), response efficacy (F = 15.69, p < .001), and total environmental perception (F = 7.80, p = .008) were higher in the experimental group than in the control group. There were no significant differences in feasibility, accessibility, satisfaction, susceptibility, self-efficacy, barrier, personal environmental behavior, and community environmental behavior between the two groups. CONCLUSION: The internet-based educational program can be the alternative for the face-to-face prenatal class to promote environmental health perceptions during pregnancy in the pandemic situations.


Subject(s)
Internet-Based Intervention , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women/psychology , Republic of Korea , Environmental Health , Perception , Internet
9.
Tohoku J Exp Med ; 258(4): 327-332, 2022 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109461

ABSTRACT

Antithrombin deficiency is a high-risk factor for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy, whereas cerebral venous thrombosis is rare. Cerebral venous thrombosis related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines has been reported; however, there are a few reports of cerebral venous thrombosis after a messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccination. A 25-year-old female in her sixth week of pregnancy presented with headache 24 days after BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccination. The following day, she presented with altered sensorium and was diagnosed with severe cerebral venous thrombosis. She demonstrated heparin resistance and was found to have an inherited antithrombin deficiency. A heterozygous missense variant in SERPINC1 (c.379T>C, p.Cys127Arg, 'AT Morioka') was detected by DNA analysis. Despite intensive care with unfractionated heparin, antithrombin concentrate, and repeated endovascular treatments, she died on the sixth day of hospitalization. Cerebral venous thrombosis in pregnant women with an antithrombin deficiency can follow a rapid and fatal course. Treatment with unfractionated heparin and antithrombin concentrate may be ineffective in severe cerebral venous thrombosis cases with antithrombin deficiency. Early recognition of antithrombin deficiency and an immediate switch to other anticoagulants may be required. Although the association between cerebral venous thrombosis and the vaccine is uncertain, COVID-19 vaccinations may require careful evaluation for patients with prothrombic factors.


Subject(s)
Antithrombin III Deficiency , COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Adult , Pregnant Women , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , BNT162 Vaccine , Heparin , RNA, Messenger , Antithrombin III Deficiency/complications , Antithrombin III Deficiency/genetics , Antithrombins/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects
10.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(3-4): 521-526, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic emerged in Wuhan, China and has spread all over the world and affected global mental health. Pregnant women may be particularly vulnerable and experience high levels of distress during an infectious disease outbreak. The aim of this study was to determine anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study surveyed a total of 283 pregnant women within the period of May 11 to May 28,2020. During their regular antenatal visit, pregnant women were invited to participate in the study. The self-created personal information form was used to assess the main characteristics of the participants. Anxiety and PTSD symptoms of the pregnant women were measured by the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R), respectively. RESULTS: The mean age of the pregnant women was 29.20±5.55 years. Regarding gestational age, 72 (25.4%), 86 (30.4) and 125 (44.2) were in the first, second and third trimesters, respectively. The mean gestational age was 23.82±11.05 weeks. The mean STAI-S and STAI-T scores were 39.52±10.56 within the cut-off value (39-40) of the instrument and 42.74±8.33, respectively. Furthermore, the mean total IES-R score was 36.60±15.65 within the cut-off value (24) of the instrument. Multiple regression analysis revealed that pregnancy complication (p=0.01) and employment status of husband (p=0.04) were the best predictors of state anxiety. Additionally, the presence of COVID-19-related symptoms (p=0.01) and educational level (p=0.01) were found to predict PTSD symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women would be likely to experience high levels of anxiety and PTSD symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic's delay phase. The results should sensitize the medical team to increased anxiety and PTDS symptoms of the pregnant women in order to prevent negative outcomes for women and their fetuses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological , Young Adult
11.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0276923, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098766

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Identifying the time of SARS-CoV-2 viral infection relative to specific gestational weeks is critical for delineating the role of viral infection timing in adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, this task is difficult when it comes to Electronic Health Records (EHR). In combating the COVID-19 pandemic for maternal health, we sought to develop and validate a clinical information extraction algorithm to detect the time of clinical events relative to gestational weeks. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used EHR from the National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C), in which the EHR are normalized by the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) Common Data Model (CDM). We performed EHR phenotyping, resulting in 270,897 pregnant women (June 1st, 2018 to May 31st, 2021). We developed a rule-based algorithm and performed a multi-level evaluation to test content validity and clinical validity, and extreme length of gestation (<150 or >300). RESULTS: The algorithm identified 296,194 pregnancies (16,659 COVID-19, 174,744 without COVID-19) in 270,897 pregnant women. For inferring gestational age, 95% cases (n = 40) have moderate-high accuracy (Cohen's Kappa = 0.62); 100% cases (n = 40) have moderate-high granularity of temporal information (Cohen's Kappa = 1). For inferring delivery dates, the accuracy is 100% (Cohen's Kappa = 1). The accuracy of gestational age detection for the extreme length of gestation is 93.3% (Cohen's Kappa = 1). Mothers with COVID-19 showed higher prevalence in obesity or overweight (35.1% vs. 29.5%), diabetes (17.8% vs. 17.0%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (0.2% vs. 0.1%), respiratory distress syndrome or acute respiratory failure (1.8% vs. 0.2%). DISCUSSION: We explored the characteristics of pregnant women by different gestational weeks of SARS-CoV-2 infection with our algorithm. TED-PC is the first to infer the exact gestational week linked with every clinical event from EHR and detect the timing of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant women. CONCLUSION: The algorithm shows excellent clinical validity in inferring gestational age and delivery dates, which supports multiple EHR cohorts on N3C studying the impact of COVID-19 on pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnant Women , Gestational Age , SARS-CoV-2 , Electronic Health Records , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome , Algorithms , Premature Birth/epidemiology
12.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0276763, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098756

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease has spread worldwide since late 2019. Vaccination is critical in controlling this pandemic. However, vaccine acceptance among pregnant women is not well-studied. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia. METHODS: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted among pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics at Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia, 2021. About 510 study subjects were selected using a systematic random sampling technique from August 25 to September 10/2021. Data collection was done by using an interviewer-administered, structured questionnaire. Epi-info 7.2 was used to enter data and then exported to SPSS version 25 software for analysis. Bivariable and multivariable binary logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with the outcome variable. Variables with a p-value < 0.2 in the bivariable analysis were entered into the multivariable analysis to control for possible confounders. Statistical significance is determined using an adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) at a p-value of < 0.05. RESULTS: Of 510 participants, 211 (41.4%) were willing to take COVID-19 vaccines. Maternal age ≥ 35 years (AOR: 5.678, 95% CI: 1.775-18.166), having contact history with COVID-19 diagnosed people (AOR: 7.724, 95% CI: 2.183, 27.329), having a pre-existing chronic disease (AOR: 3.131, 95% CI: 1.700-5.766), good knowledge about COVID-19 vaccine (AOR: 2.391, 95% CI: 1.144, 4.998) and good attitude towards COVID-19 vaccine (AOR: 2.128, 95% CI: 1.348) were significantly associated with the outcome variable. CONCLUSIONS: The willingness to take COVID-19 vaccine among pregnant mothers was low. Age, contact history with COVID-19 diagnosed people, chronic disease, knowledge, and attitude towards COVID-19 vaccine were factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine willingness. To enhance the COVID-19 vaccine acceptance, the government with different stakeholders should strengthen public education about the importance of getting COVID-19 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnant Women , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Ambulatory Care Facilities
13.
Rev Colomb Obstet Ginecol ; 73(2): 194-202, 2022 06 30.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091184

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe the prevalence of symptoms of depression and worry affecting pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. Material and methods: Descriptive crosssectional study that included pregnant women with access to a technological device (mobile phone, computer or tablet) and Internet connection, living in Antioquia, Colombia. Women with literary and technological illiteracy were excluded. An online survey was conducted to gather information about sociodemographic and baseline clinical conditions and the main concerns caused by the pandemic. Additionally, the Edinburg Depression Scale (EPDS) was applied in order to measure the risk of depression. The Jamovi software was used for data processing and statistical analysis. Results: Overall, 345 pregnant women between 15 and 44 years of age were surveyed, with the finding of a 30.4 % prevalence of the risk of depression. Domestic violence and absence of a support network were identified in 4.9 % and 8.4 % of cases. The major sources of worry were the fear of being separated from their babies on the day of birth, the possibility of having to be alone during childbirth, and the fear of contagion due to potential effects on the fetus or the newborn. Conclusions: Depression symptoms have been frequent among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is important to inquire about stress factors and depression symptoms during prenatal visits, childbirth and the postpartum period. Additional local studies are needed to assess other mental health disorders that may have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Objetivos: describir la prevalencia de los síntomas de depresión y las preocupaciones que afectaron a las gestantes durante la pandemia por COVID-19. Materiales y métodos: estudio transversal descriptivo, se incluyeron mujeres gestantes, con acceso a un medio tecnológico (celular, computador o tableta) y conectividad a internet, residentes en Antioquia, Colombia. Se excluyeron mujeres con analfabetismo literario y tecnológico. Se encuestaron, en línea, las condiciones sociodemográficas y clínicas basales y las principales preocupaciones generadas por la pandemia, además se aplicó la Escala de Depresión de Edimburgo (EPDS) para medir el riesgo de depresión. Se usó el software Jamovi para el procesamiento y análisis estadístico. Resultados: se encuestaron 345 mujeres gestantes de 15 a 44 años, se identificó una prevalencia de riesgo de depresión en 30,4 % de las mujeres encuestadas. Se identificó violencia intrafamiliar en el 4,9 % y ausencia de red de apoyo en el 8,4 %. Se encontraron como mayores preocupaciones temor a ser separadas del bebé el día del parto, la posibilidad de no tener acompañante durante el parto, y temor al contagio por los efectos en el bebé in útero o en el recién nacido. Conclusiones: los síntomas de depresión han sido frecuentes en las mujeres gestantes durante la pandemia del COVID-19. Es importante averiguar por factores de estrés y síntomas de depresión en el control prenatal, el parto y el postparto. Se requieren nuevos estudios locales que evalúen otros trastornos de salud mental que se hayan podido incrementar durante la pandemia por COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnant Women , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colombia/epidemiology , Depression , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Prevalence
14.
Viruses ; 14(11)2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090354

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to assess the vaccination status and factors contributing to vaccine hesitancy among pregnant women in the largest province of Pakistan. A multicentric, prospective, survey-based study using an interviewer-administered tool was conducted among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics between 1 December 2021 through 30 January 2022 across seven hospitals in Pakistan. The healthcare professionals providing care at the participating hospitals administered the survey. Four hundred and five pregnant women fully consented and completed the study. The majority of the study participants (70.6%, n = 286) were aged between 25 and 34 and had a previous successful pregnancy history. More than half of the study participants (56.0%, n = 227) did not receive COVID-19 vaccination at the time of data collection despite their family members (93.9%, n = 372) had already received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. Among those who received COVID-19 vaccination (n = 173), vaccine efficacy, protection for the foetus, and risk of COVID-19-associated hospitalisation were the main driving factors for vaccine hesitancy. The majority of the unvaccinated women (77.8%, n = 182) had no intention of receiving the vaccine. However, more than two-thirds (85.7%, n = 342) consulted the doctor about COVID-19 vaccines, and most were recommended to receive COVID-19 vaccines by the doctors (80.7%, n = 280). Women were significantly more likely to be vaccinated if they had employment (odds ratio [OR] 4.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.31-8.64) compared with their counterparts who were homemakers, consulted their doctors (OR 0.12, 95% CI: 0.04-0.35), and if they did not have pregnancy-related issues (OR 6.02, 95% CI: 2.36-15.33). In this study, vaccine hesitancy was prevalent, and vaccine uptake was low among pregnant women. Education and employment did impact COVID vaccination uptake, emphasising the need for more targeted efforts to enhance the trust in vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Adult , Pregnant Women , COVID-19 Vaccines , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pakistan/epidemiology , Vaccination Hesitancy , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Vaccination
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090182

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to describe the characteristics and factors related to pain perception in pregnant women, such as optimism, personality traits, and fear of developing COVID-19 consequences. Sixty-six pregnant women aged 23 to 42 years participated in the study, and the comparison group consisted of n = 59 non-pregnant female students aged 19 to 23 years. Pressure pain threshold and pain tolerance were measured with an algometer. To assess psychological characteristics, the Life-Orientation Test-Revised was used to assess optimism, the Fear of COVID-19 Scale was used to assess COVID-19 anxiety, and the Ten-Item Personality Inventory was applied to assess personality traits in a five-factor model. The main results of the study showed that pain tolerance was significantly lower in both dominant and non-dominant hand pregnant women than in the comparison group. The studied pregnant women had higher scores for conscientiousness, fear of COVID-19, and optimism compared with the non-pregnant women. Regression analysis showed that the variability in pain perception among pregnant women could not be explained by individual differences in personality traits, optimism, and fear of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parturition , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Parturition/psychology , Pain Threshold , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnant Women/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090170

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: to examine the effect of an online supervised exercise program during pregnancy on the prevention of GDM, and on maternal and childbirth outcomes. (2) Methods: we conducted a randomized clinical trial (NCT04563065) in 260 pregnant women without obstetric contraindications who were randomized into two study groups: intervention group (IG, N = 130) or control group (CG, N = 130). An online supervised exercise program was conducted from 8-10 to 38-39 weeks of pregnancy. (3) Results: no significant differences were found at baseline in maternal characteristics; nevertheless, certain outcomes showed a favorable trend towards the IG. A lower number and percentage of GDM cases were found in the IG compared to the CG (N = 5/4.9% vs. N = 17/16.8%, p = 0.006). Similarly, fewer cases of excessive maternal weight gain (N = 12/11.8% vs. N = 31/30.7%, p = 0.001) were found in the IG, and a lower percentage of instrumental deliveries (N = 8/11.3% vs. N = 13/15.1%) and c-sections (N = 7/9.9% vs. N = 20/23.3%, p = 0.046). (4) Conclusions: an online supervised exercise program can be a preventative tool for GDM in healthy pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes, Gestational , Humans , Pregnancy , Female , Diabetes, Gestational/prevention & control , Diabetes, Gestational/epidemiology , Pregnant Women , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Exercise , Weight Gain
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090169

ABSTRACT

The study aims to assess pregnancy-specific stress among pregnant women in Spain during the first lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic. Two samples of pregnant women from the south of Spain (Andalusia) were assessed using the Prenatal Distress Questionnaire (PDQ) and a sociodemographic and obstetric questionnaire. Group 1 (N = 155) was recruited face-to-face, whereas Group 2 (N = 78) was recruited online. Pregnancy-specific stress levels were significantly different in both groups. The face-to-face group (Group 1) had higher pregnancy-specific stress levels than the online group (Group 2). The online sample over-represents young adult pregnant women with high education levels and a high number of previous miscarriages. The face-to-face study seems more accessible to racially and ethnically diverse groups. The main concern among both groups was the risk of having a sick neonate. Research during the COVID-19 pandemic can benefit from using online resources to collect data to screen and identify perinatal mental health problems in a crisis environment. Nevertheless, researchers should be aware of the potential limitations this strategy can have, for example, certain groups of people may have limited access to the internet.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infant, Newborn , Young Adult , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Pregnant Women/psychology , Parturition/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Anxiety
18.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(41): e297, 2022 Oct 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089755

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to describe the maternal, obstetrical, and neonatal outcomes in pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and identify the predictors associated with the severity of COVID-19. METHODS: This multicenter observational study included consecutive pregnant women admitted because of COVID-19 confirmed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test at 15 hospitals in the Republic of Korea between January 2020 and December 2021. RESULTS: A total of 257 women with COVID-19 and 62 newborns were included in this study. Most of the patients developed this disease during the third trimester. Nine patients (7.4%) developed pregnancy-related complications. All pregnant women received inpatient treatment, of whom 9 (3.5%) required intensive care, but none of them died. The gestational age at COVID-19 diagnosis (odds ratio [OR], 1.096, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.15) and parity (OR, 1.703, 95% CI, 1.13-2.57) were identified as significant risk factors of severe diseases. Among women who delivered, 78.5% underwent cesarean section. Preterm birth (38.5%), premature rupture of membranes (7.7%), and miscarriage (4.6%) occurred, but there was no stillbirth or neonatal death. The RT-PCR test of newborns' amniotic fluid and umbilical cord blood samples was negative for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. CONCLUSION: At the time of COVID-19 diagnosis, gestational age and parity of pregnant women were the risk factors of disease severity. Vertical transmission of COVID-19 was not observed, and maternal severity did not significantly affect the neonatal prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Infant, Newborn , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , COVID-19 Testing , Cesarean Section , Pregnant Women , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Outcome , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
19.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0276692, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089440

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection during pregnancy causes adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes such as preterm birth, low birth weight, severe illness, intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation, and death. Pregnant women's knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) towards COVID-19 infection prevention are crucial to ensure the health of the mother and foetus. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to estimate the pooled prevalence of pregnant women's KAP towards COVID-19 infection prevention in Ethiopia. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, African Online Journal, and Web of Sciences database to retrieve related articles. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guideline was used. Funnel plot and Eggers test were done to assess publication bias. Cochrane Q-test and I2 statistic were done to chick evidence of heterogeneity. Subgroup analysis was computed based on the study region and year of publication. Data were extracted using a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and analyzed using STATA version 14 statistical software. Weighted inverse variance random effect model was run to estimate the pooled prevalence of pregnant women's KAP towards COVID-19 infection prevention. RESULTS: A total of 9 studies with 4,103 pregnant women were included. The pooled prevalence of knowledge, attitude, and practice towards COVID-19 infection prevention among pregnant women's in Ethiopia were 60.24% (95% CI; 53.69 to 66.79, I2 = 95%), 62.46% (95% CI; 45.68, 79.23, I2 = 98.8%), and 52.29% (95% CI; 43.91%-60.66% I2 = 96.5%) respectively. Maternal age (AOR = 1.87, 1.40-2.49), residence (AOR = 2.23, 1.50-3.31), secondary and above educational status (AOR = 3.36, 2.46-4.58), good knowledge (AOR = 2.73, 2.18-3.41), and fear of COVID-19 infection (AOR = 2.60, 1.78, 3.80) were factors associated with COVID-19 infection prevention practice among pregnant women's in Ethiopia. CONCLUSION: The knowledge, attitude, and practice of COVID-19 infection prevention among pregnant women were low. Therefore, policymakers, maternal and child health program planners, and stakeholders should target to improve pregnant women's awareness regarding COVID-19 infection preventive measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Premature Birth , Child , Pregnancy , Female , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Pregnant Women , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control
20.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 357, 2022 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089173

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pregnancy is associated with increased risk for severe COVID-19. Few studies have examined knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) related to pregnancy during the pandemic. This study investigated the association between socio-demographic characteristics and KAP related to COVID-19 among pregnant women in an urban community in Thailand. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was distributed among pregnant women in Bangkok, Thailand from July-August 2021. Binary logistic regression was conducted to test the association between socio-demographic characteristics and KAP related to COVID-19, and a Spearman's analysis tested correlations between KAP scores. RESULTS: A total of 150 pregnancy survey responses were received. Most participants were third trimester (27-40 weeks gestation; 68.0%). Pregnancy had never been risked contracting COVID-19 (84.7%). Most expressed concerns about being infected with COVID-19 during pregnancy and following birth (94.0 and 70.0%, respectively). The results of binary logistic regression analysis found associations between knowledge and marital status (OR = 4.983, 95%CI 1.894-13.107). In addition, having a bachelor's degree or higher was associated with higher attitude scores (OR = 2.733, 95%CI 1.045-7.149), as was being aged 26-30 (OR = 2.413 95%CI 0.882-6.602) and 31-35 years of age (OR = 2.518-2.664, 95%CI 0.841-8.442). Higher practice scores were associated with having a bachelor's degree or higher (OR = 2.285 95%CI 1.110-6.146), and income ≥15,001 bath (OR = 4.747 95%CI 1.588-14.192). Correlation analysis found a weak positive correlation between knowledge and practice scores (r = 0.210, p-value = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Participants overall had high KAP scores. This study can guide public health strategies regarding pregnant women and COVID-19. We recommend that interventions to improve and attitude and practice scores. Knowledge on pregnancy and COVID-19 should focus on reducing fear and improving attitudes toward the care of patients as well as the promotion of preventive practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parturition , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thailand/epidemiology
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