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3.
Nutrients ; 14(7)2022 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776308

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of the SARS-CoV-2 lockdown on dietary habits, body weight, left hepatic lobe volume, use of micronutrient supplements, micronutrient status, frequency of physical activity, and evolution of comorbidities in patients undergoing preoperative care for BS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively evaluated the dietary habits (including use of micronutrient supplements and frequency of physical activity) of 36 patients who were candidates for BS from March to May 2020; 7-day food dietary records, body weight, left hepatic lobe volume by ultrasound, micronutrient status, and evolution of comorbidities were assessed. RESULTS: All patients completed the study. Of the participants, 44.4% (16/36), 47.2% (17/36), and 27.8% (10/36) followed the preoperative indications for vegetables, fruits, and legumes, respectively, whereas over 50% did not. Furthermore, 30.6% (11/36) and 55.6% (20/36) of participants followed the prescribed recommendations for carbohydrates/sweets products and alcohol, respectively. A total of 61.1% (22/36) of participants experienced new foods and new culinary preparations. In addition, at the time of the study, we found that only 11.1% (4/36) were engaged in prescribed physical activity and only 36.1% (13/36) were taking prescribed micronutrient supplements. Compared to the initial weight, we observed an increased body weight and body mass index (+4.9%, p = 0.115; +1.89%, p = 0.0692, respectively), and no improvement in left hepatic lobe volume, micronutrient status, or comorbidities was recorded for any patient in the anamnesis. CONCLUSIONS: Lockdown determined by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has negatively affected the preoperative program of BS candidates, resulting in a postponement to the resumption of bariatric surgical activity.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , COVID-19 , Obesity, Morbid , Trace Elements , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Micronutrients , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Preoperative Care , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760570

ABSTRACT

Compared to young adults, it is difficult for the older people with relatively low health literacy to perform proper bowel preparation for a colonoscopy. This study aims to identify the relationship between knowledge, compliance with bowel preparation, and bowel cleanliness with health literacy in older patients undergoing colonoscopy. The participants were 110 older people undergoing colonoscopy, recruited from an endoscopy hospital in G metropolitan city, South Korea. Data obtained from a structured questionnaire that included items on health literacy and knowledge of and compliance with bowel preparation, and the Aronchick bowel cleanliness scale. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, χ-test, Pearson's correlation, t-test, and ANCOVA. Participants who were younger and those with a higher education level and better economic status had a statistically significantly higher health literacy level. Older people with a health literacy level of 7 points and above had a higher knowledge level and bowel cleanliness index, a showed better compliance with bowel preparation. The results highlight the need for developing a customized education intervention program that can improve health literacy for successful bowel preparation and examination of the older population undergoing colonoscopy.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Aged , Cathartics , Colonoscopy , Humans , Patient Compliance , Preoperative Care/methods
5.
Eur J Med Res ; 27(1): 41, 2022 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745423

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, endoscopic societies initially recommended reduction of endoscopic procedures. In particular non-urgent endoscopies should be postponed. However, this might lead to unnecessary delay in diagnosing gastrointestinal conditions. METHODS: Retrospectively we analysed the gastrointestinal endoscopies performed at the Central Endoscopy Unit of Saarland University Medical Center during seven weeks from 23 March to 10 May 2020 and present our real-world single-centre experience with an individualized rtPCR-based pre-endoscopy SARS-CoV-2 testing strategy. We also present our experience with this strategy in 2021. RESULTS: Altogether 359 gastrointestinal endoscopies were performed in the initial period. The testing strategy enabled us to conservatively handle endoscopy programme reduction (44% reduction as compared 2019) during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of COVID-19 rtPCR from nasopharyngeal swabs were available in 89% of patients prior to endoscopies. Apart from six patients with known COVID-19, all other tested patients were negative. The frequencies of endoscopic therapies and clinically significant findings did not differ between patients with or without SARS-CoV-2 tests. In 2021 we were able to unrestrictedly perform all requested endoscopic procedures (> 5000 procedures) by applying the rtPCR-based pre-endoscopy SARS-CoV-2 testing strategy, regardless of next waves of COVID-19. Only two out-patients (1893 out-patient procedures) were tested positive in the year 2021. CONCLUSION: A structured pre-endoscopy SARS-CoV-2 testing strategy is feasible in the clinical routine of an endoscopy unit. rtPCR-based pre-endoscopy SARS-CoV-2 testing safely allowed unrestricted continuation of endoscopic procedures even in the presence of high incidence rates of COVID-19. Given the low frequency of positive tests, the absolute effect of pre-endoscopy testing on viral transmission may be low when FFP-2 masks are regularly used.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal/statistics & numerical data , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Germany , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
6.
Anticancer Res ; 42(3): 1623-1628, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1716347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: The significance of spirometry as preoperative risk assessment for gastrointestinal surgery has been controversial. At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, preoperative spirometry was temporarily suspended in our institute. This study was aimed to investigate the necessity of spirometry for gastrointestinal cancer surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We compared short-term postoperative outcomes between 318 patients who underwent surgery for colorectal or gastric cancer with (Spirometry group; n=272) or without spirometry (Non-spirometry group; n=46). RESULTS: Respiratory functional disorders were detected in 77 (28.3%) patients in the Spirometry group. No significant differences were noted in complications, including pneumonia, or the length of hospital stay between the two groups. An advanced age, male sex, comorbidities with respiratory diseases, and a smoking history significantly correlated with abnormal results in spirometry. CONCLUSION: Preoperative spirometry may be substituted with other clinical factors in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.


Subject(s)
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/surgery , Preoperative Care , Spirometry , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Female , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
7.
Eur J Surg Oncol ; 48(6): 1189-1197, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670448

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prehabilitation is a promising method to enhance postoperative recovery, especially in patients suffering from cancer. Particularly during times of social distancing, providing home-based programmes may have become a suitable solution to increase compliance and effectiveness. METHODS: In line with the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review was conducted including trials that investigated the effect of home-based prehabilitation (HBP) in patients undergoing surgery for cancer. The primary outcome was postoperative functional capacity (6 min walk test, 6MWT). Secondary outcomes were postoperative complications and compliance. RESULTS: Five randomized controlled trials were included with 351 patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer, oesophagogastric cancer, bladder cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Three studies presented results of significant progress after eight weeks. The meta-analysis showed a significant improvement of the 6MWT in the prehabilitation group compared to the control group preoperatively (MD 35.06; 95% CI 11.58 to 58.54; p = .003) and eight weeks postoperatively (MD 44.91; 95% CI 6.04 to 83.79; p = .02) compared to baseline. Compliance rate varied from 63% to 83% with no significant difference between prehabilitation and control groups. These data must be interpreted with caution because of a high amount of heterogeneity and small sample sizes. DISCUSSION: In conclusion, HBP may enhance overall functional capacity of patients receiving oncological surgery compared to standard of care. This could be a promising alternative to hospital-based prehabilitation regarding the current pandemic and further digitalization in the future. In order to increase accessibility and effectiveness of prehabilitation, home-based solutions should be further investigated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Colorectal Neoplasms , Lung Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Preoperative Care/methods
9.
Int Anesthesiol Clin ; 60(1): 24-32, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1584028
12.
Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg ; 27(12): 719-725, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526238

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Preoperative counseling can affect postoperative outcomes and satisfaction. We hypothesized that patient preparedness would be equivalent after preoperative counseling phone calls versus preoperative counseling office visits before prolapse surgery. METHODS: This was an equivalence randomized controlled trial of women undergoing pelvic organ prolapse surgery. Participants were randomized to receive standardized counseling via a preoperative phone call or office visit. The primary outcome was patient preparedness measured on a 5-point Likert scale by the Patient Preparedness Questionnaire at the postoperative visit. A predetermined equivalence margin of 20% was used. Two 1-sided tests for equivalence were used for the primary outcome. RESULTS: We randomized 120 women. The study was concluded early because of COVID-19 and subsequent surgery cancellations. There were 85 participants with primary outcome data (43 offices, 42 phones). Mean age was 62.0 years (±1.0) and 64 (75.3%) had stage III or stage IV prolapse. The primary outcome, patient preparedness measured at the postoperative visit, was equivalent between groups (office, n = 43 [97.7%]; phone, n = 42 [97.6%], P < 0.001). Most women reported they would have preferred a phone call (n = 66, 65.5%) with more women in the phone group expressing this preference than the office group (office 40.5% vs phone 90.5%, P < 0.001). Ultimately, nearly all women (96.5%) were satisfied with their method of counseling. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative counseling phone calls were equivalent to office visits for patient preparedness for pelvic organ prolapse surgery. This study demonstrates patient acceptance of phone calls for preoperative counseling. Telehealth modalities should be considered as an option for preoperative patient counseling.


Subject(s)
Counseling/methods , Office Visits , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Pelvic Organ Prolapse/surgery , Telephone , Early Termination of Clinical Trials , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Patient Preference , Patient Satisfaction , Preoperative Care
13.
Transplant Proc ; 53(4): 1126-1131, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525970

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 drastically impacted solid organ transplantation. Lacking scientific evidence, a very stringent but safer policy was imposed on liver transplantation (LT) early in the pandemic. Restrictive transplant guidelines must be reevaluated and adjusted as data become available. Before LT, the prevailing policy requires a negative severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of donors and recipients. Unfortunately, prolonged viral RNA shedding frequently hinders transplantation. Recent data reveal that positive test results for viral genome are frequently due to noninfectious and prolonged convalescent shedding of viral genome. Moreover, studies demonstrated that the cycle threshold of quantitative RT-PCR could be leveraged to inform clinical transplant decision-making. We present an evidence-adjusted and significantly less restrictive policy for LT, where risk tolerance is tiered to recipient acuity. In addition, we delineate the pretransplant clinical decision-making, intra- and postoperative management, and early outcome of 2 recipients of a liver graft performed while their RT-PCR of airway swabs remained positive. Convalescent positive RT-PCR results are common in the transplant arena, and the proposed policy permits reasonably safe LT in many circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Policy , Liver Transplantation/legislation & jurisprudence , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Female , Humans , Infection Control/legislation & jurisprudence , Infection Control/methods , Liver Transplantation/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/virology , Preoperative Care/legislation & jurisprudence , Preoperative Care/methods , Reference Values , Tissue Donors , Virus Shedding
14.
J Surg Oncol ; 125(4): 564-569, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525470

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic, with high rate of asymptomatic infections and increased perioperative complications, prompted widespread adoption of screening methods. We analyzed the incidence of asymptomatic infection and perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing cancer surgery. We also studied the impact on subsequent cancer treatment in those with COVID-19. METHODS: All patients who underwent elective and emergency cancer surgery from April to September 2020 were included. After screening for symptoms, a preoperative test was performed from nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs before the procedure. Patients were followed up for 30 days postoperatively and complications were noted. RESULTS: 2108 asymptomatic patients were tested, of which 200 (9.5%) tested positive. Of those who tested positive, 140 (70%) underwent the planned surgery at a median of 30 days from testing positive, and 20 (14.3%) had ≥ Grade III complications. Forty (20%) patients did not receive the intended treatment; 110 patients were retested in the Postoperative period, and 41 (37.3%) tested positive and 9(22%) patients died of COVID-related complications. CONCLUSION: Routine preoperative testing for COVID-19 helps to segregate patients with asymptomatic infection. Higher complications occur in those who develop COVID-19 in postoperative period. Prolonged delay in surgery after COVID infection may influence planned treatment.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/surgery , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Preoperative Care , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Incidence , India/epidemiology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Young Adult
15.
Minerva Pediatr (Torino) ; 73(5): 460-466, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513377

ABSTRACT

Inevitably, along with other healthcare specializations, pediatric surgery was affected by the Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Children were reported to manifest mild to moderate symptoms and mortality was primarily observed in patients aged <1 year and having underlying comorbidities. Most of the cases were asymptomatic in children, hence, posing a challenge for pediatric surgery centers to take drastic measures to reduce the virus transmission. Telemedicine was introduced and out-patient consultations were conducted online as out-patient clinics were closed. Elective surgeries were postponed with delayed appointments while the healthcare sector was diverted towards tackling COVID-19. Case urgency was classified and triaged, leading to limited surgeries being performed only in COVID-19 negative patients following an extensive screening process. The screening process consisted of online history taking and RT-PCR tests. Newer practices such as mouth rinse, video laryngoscopy, and anesthesia were introduced to restrict patients from crying, coughing, and sneezing, as an attempt to avoid aerosolization of viral particles and safely conduct pediatric surgeries during the pandemic. Surgical trainees were also affected as the smaller number of surgeries conducted reduced the clinical experience available to medical enthusiasts. There is still room for advanced practices to be introduced in pediatric surgery and restore all kinds of surgeries to improve the quality of life of the patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pediatrics , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Child , Child, Preschool , Elective Surgical Procedures , General Surgery/education , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Patient Selection , Pediatrics/education , Preoperative Care/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Triage
16.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1115, 2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477299

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Correct preoperative estimation of the malignant extent is crucial for optimal planning of breast cancer surgery. The sensitivity of mammography is lower in dense breasts, and additional imaging techniques are sometimes warranted. Contrast-enhanced mammography (CEM) has shown similar sensitivity and in some cases better specificity, than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in small, observational studies. CEM may be more cost-effective than MRI, and may provide better identification of the tumor extent, however, no randomized trials have been performed to date to investigate the added value of CEM. In a feasibility study, we found that the treatment was changed in 10/47 (21%) cases after additional CEM. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the added value of CEM in preoperative staging of breast cancer in a randomized study. METHOD: This prospective randomized study will include 440 patients with strongly suspected or established diagnosis of breast malignancy, based on assessment with mammography, ultrasound and core biopsy/cytology, and for whom primary surgery is planned. Patients will be randomized 1:1 using a web-based randomization tool to additional investigation with CEM or no further imaging. The CEM findings will be taken into consideration, which may lead to changes in primary treatment, which is the primary endpoint of this study. Secondary endpoints include rate of reoperation and number of avoidable mastectomies, as well as a cost-benefit analysis of additional CEM. Patient-reported health-related quality of life will be investigated at 1 year with the validated Breast-Q™ questionnaire. The rate of local recurrence or new cancer ipsi- or contralaterally within 5 years will be assessed from medical records and pathology reports. DISCUSSION: The aim of this trial is to explore the added value of CEM in preoperative staging of breast cancer. The results obtained from this study will contribute to our knowledge on CEM as an additional imaging method to standard investigation with digital mammography and ultrasound. The findings may also provide additional information on which patient groups would benefit from CEM, and on the economic aspects of CEM in standard preoperative practice. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov , registration no: NCT04437602 , date of registration: June 18, 2020.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Contrast Media/administration & dosage , Mammography/methods , Neoplasm Staging/methods , Biopsy, Large-Core Needle , Breast/diagnostic imaging , Breast/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Mammography/economics , Mastectomy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Preoperative Care , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Reoperation , Sensitivity and Specificity , Ultrasonography, Mammary
17.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 92: 41-45, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472127

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The initial COVID-19 pandemic shutdown led to the canceling of elective surgeries throughout most of the USA and Canada. OBJECTIVE: This survey was carried out on behalf of the Parkinson Study Group (PSG) to understand the impact of the shutdown on deep brain stimulation (DBS) practices in North America. METHODS: A survey was distributed through RedCap® to the members of the PSG Functional Neurosurgical Working Group. Only one member from each site was asked to respond to the survey. Responses were collected from May 15 to June 6, 2020. RESULTS: Twenty-three sites participated; 19 (83%) sites were from the USA and 4 (17%) from Canada. Twenty-one sites were academic medical centers. COVID-19 associated DBS restrictions were in place from 4 to 16 weeks. One-third of sites halted preoperative evaluations, while two-thirds of the sites offered limited preoperative evaluations. Institutional policy was the main contributor for the reported practice changes, with 87% of the sites additionally reporting patient-driven surgical delays secondary to pandemic concerns. Pre-post DBS associated management changes affected preoperative assessments 96%; electrode placement 87%; new implantable pulse generator (IPG) placement 83%; IPG replacement 65%; immediate postoperative DBS programming 74%; and routine DBS programming 91%. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic related shutdown resulted in DBS practice changes in almost all North American sites who responded to this large survey. Information learned could inform development of future contingency plans to reduce patient delays in care under similar circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Deep Brain Stimulation/statistics & numerical data , Implantable Neurostimulators/statistics & numerical data , Movement Disorders/therapy , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Postoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers , Canada , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgeons/statistics & numerical data , United States
18.
J Clin Anesth ; 75: 110540, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458877

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Preoperative assessment is a standard evaluation, traditionally done in-person in a preanesthesia clinic, for patients who will be undergoing a procedure involving anesthesia. Given the increased adoption of virtual care during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to review the effectiveness of virtual preoperative assessment for the evaluation of surgical patients. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. SETTING: MEDLINE (Ovid), MEDLINE InProcess/ePubs, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched from the initial coverage of the respective database to May 2021. A manual citation search of Google Scholar and PubMed was conducted to identify missed articles. Continued literature surveillance was done through July 2021. PATIENTS: Patients aged 18 years and older undergoing virtual preoperative anesthesia assessment. INTERVENTIONS: Virtual preoperative assessment. MEASUREMENTS: Surgery cancellation rates, patient experience, resources saved, staff experience, success in using the data collected to diagnose and manage patients. MAIN RESULTS: Fifteen studies (n = 31,496 patients) were included in this review. The average age of patients was 58 ± 15 years, and 47% were male. Virtual preoperative assessment resulted in similar surgery cancellation rates compared to in-person evaluation, with a pooled cancellation rate of 2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1-3%). Most studies reported a positive patient experience, with a pooled estimate of 90% (95% CI, 81-95%). There was a high success rate in using the information collected with virtual care, in the range of 92-100%, to diagnose and manage patients resulting in time and cost savings in the range of 24-137 min and $60-67 per patient. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrates the utility of virtual care for preoperative assessment of surgical patients. Virtual preanesthesia evaluation had similar surgery cancellation rates, high patient satisfaction, and reduced costs compared to in-person evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Preoperative Care , SARS-CoV-2
19.
JAAPA ; 34(10): 43-48, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440651

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: SARS-CoV-2 has profoundly affected the way healthcare is delivered and has created significant strain on medical facilities globally. As a result, hospitals have had to continuously adapt in order to provide optimal patient care while minimizing the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, particularly in the surgical setting. Texas Children's Hospital developed a set of protocols for surgical screening and clearance of patients in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. These screening protocols were designed to mitigate the risk of exposing patients and healthcare providers to SARS-CoV-2 and have evolved significantly as a result of the emerging changes in medicine, technology, and governmental regulations. In this article, we share the reasoning behind the development, implementation, and successive modification of our institutional screening protocols.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Preoperative Care , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Child , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 112, 2021 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who undergo surgery have impaired postoperative outcomes and increased mortality. Consequently, elective and semi-urgent operations on the increasing number of patients severely affected by COVID-19 have been indefinitely postponed.in many countries with unclear implications on disease progression and overall survival. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the establishment of a standardized screening program for acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is sufficient to ensure high-quality medical and surgical treatment of COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients while minimizing in-hospital SARS-CoV-2 transmission. METHODS: The screening program comprised polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of nasopharyngeal swabs and a standardized questionnaire about potential symptoms for SARS-CoV-2 infection. All elective and emergency patients admitted to the surgical department of a tertiary-care hospital center in Lower Franconia, Germany, between March and May 2020 were included and their characteristics were recorded. RESULTS: Out of the study population (n = 657), 509 patients (77.5%) had at least one risk factor for a potentially severe course of COVID-19 and 164 patients (25%) were active smokers. The average 7-day incidence in Lower Franconia was 24.0/100,000 during the observation period. Preoperative PCR testing revealed four asymptomatic positive patients out of the 657 tested patients. No postoperative SARS-CoV-2 infection or transmission could be detected. CONCLUSION: The implementation of a standardized preoperative screening program to both COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients can ensure high-quality surgical care while minimizing infection risk for healthcare workers and potential in-hospital transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Infection Control/methods , Vascular Surgical Procedures , Adult , Aged , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Preoperative Care , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data
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