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1.
Eur J Med Res ; 27(1): 41, 2022 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745423

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, endoscopic societies initially recommended reduction of endoscopic procedures. In particular non-urgent endoscopies should be postponed. However, this might lead to unnecessary delay in diagnosing gastrointestinal conditions. METHODS: Retrospectively we analysed the gastrointestinal endoscopies performed at the Central Endoscopy Unit of Saarland University Medical Center during seven weeks from 23 March to 10 May 2020 and present our real-world single-centre experience with an individualized rtPCR-based pre-endoscopy SARS-CoV-2 testing strategy. We also present our experience with this strategy in 2021. RESULTS: Altogether 359 gastrointestinal endoscopies were performed in the initial period. The testing strategy enabled us to conservatively handle endoscopy programme reduction (44% reduction as compared 2019) during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of COVID-19 rtPCR from nasopharyngeal swabs were available in 89% of patients prior to endoscopies. Apart from six patients with known COVID-19, all other tested patients were negative. The frequencies of endoscopic therapies and clinically significant findings did not differ between patients with or without SARS-CoV-2 tests. In 2021 we were able to unrestrictedly perform all requested endoscopic procedures (> 5000 procedures) by applying the rtPCR-based pre-endoscopy SARS-CoV-2 testing strategy, regardless of next waves of COVID-19. Only two out-patients (1893 out-patient procedures) were tested positive in the year 2021. CONCLUSION: A structured pre-endoscopy SARS-CoV-2 testing strategy is feasible in the clinical routine of an endoscopy unit. rtPCR-based pre-endoscopy SARS-CoV-2 testing safely allowed unrestricted continuation of endoscopic procedures even in the presence of high incidence rates of COVID-19. Given the low frequency of positive tests, the absolute effect of pre-endoscopy testing on viral transmission may be low when FFP-2 masks are regularly used.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal/statistics & numerical data , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Germany , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
2.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 92: 41-45, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472127

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The initial COVID-19 pandemic shutdown led to the canceling of elective surgeries throughout most of the USA and Canada. OBJECTIVE: This survey was carried out on behalf of the Parkinson Study Group (PSG) to understand the impact of the shutdown on deep brain stimulation (DBS) practices in North America. METHODS: A survey was distributed through RedCap® to the members of the PSG Functional Neurosurgical Working Group. Only one member from each site was asked to respond to the survey. Responses were collected from May 15 to June 6, 2020. RESULTS: Twenty-three sites participated; 19 (83%) sites were from the USA and 4 (17%) from Canada. Twenty-one sites were academic medical centers. COVID-19 associated DBS restrictions were in place from 4 to 16 weeks. One-third of sites halted preoperative evaluations, while two-thirds of the sites offered limited preoperative evaluations. Institutional policy was the main contributor for the reported practice changes, with 87% of the sites additionally reporting patient-driven surgical delays secondary to pandemic concerns. Pre-post DBS associated management changes affected preoperative assessments 96%; electrode placement 87%; new implantable pulse generator (IPG) placement 83%; IPG replacement 65%; immediate postoperative DBS programming 74%; and routine DBS programming 91%. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic related shutdown resulted in DBS practice changes in almost all North American sites who responded to this large survey. Information learned could inform development of future contingency plans to reduce patient delays in care under similar circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Deep Brain Stimulation/statistics & numerical data , Implantable Neurostimulators/statistics & numerical data , Movement Disorders/therapy , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Postoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers , Canada , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgeons/statistics & numerical data , United States
3.
Clin Orthop Relat Res ; 479(8): 1691-1699, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132600

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are asymptomatic. The prevalence of COVID-19 in orthopaedic populations will vary depending on the time and place where the sampling is performed. The idea that asymptomatic carriers play a role is generalizable but has not been studied in large populations of patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery. We therefore evaluated this topic in one large, metropolitan city in a state that had the ninth-most infections in the United States at the time this study was completed (June 2020). This work was based on a screening and testing protocol that required all patients to be tested for COVID-19 preoperatively. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) What is the prevalence of asymptomatic COVID-19 infection in patients planning to undergo orthopaedic surgery in one major city, in order to provide other surgeons with a framework for assessing COVID-19 rates in their healthcare system? (2) How did patients with positive test results for COVID-19 differ in terms of age, sex, and orthopaedic conditions? (3) What proportion of patients had complications treated, and how many patients had a symptomatic COVID-19 infection within 30 days of surgery (recognizing that some may have been missed and so our estimates of event rates will necessarily underestimate the frequency of this event)? METHODS: All adult patients scheduled for surgery at four facilities (two tertiary care hospitals, one orthopaedic specialty hospital, and one ambulatory surgery center) at a single institution in the Philadelphia metropolitan area from April 27, 2020 to June 12, 2020 were included in this study. A total of 1295 patients were screened for symptoms, exposure, temperature, and oxygen saturation via a standardized protocol before surgical scheduling; 1.5% (19 of 1295) were excluded because they had COVID-19 symptoms, exposure, or recent travel based on the initial screening questionnaire, leaving 98.5% (1276 of 1295) who underwent testing for COVID-19 preoperatively. All 1276 patients who passed the initial screening test underwent nasopharyngeal swabbing for COVID-19 via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction before surgery. The mean age at the time of testing was 56 ± 16 years, and 53% (672 of 1276) were men. Eighty-seven percent (1106), 8% (103), and 5% (67) were tested via the Roche, Abbott, and Cepheid assays, respectively. All patients undergoing elective surgery were tested via the Roche assay, while those undergoing nonelective surgery received either the Abbott or Cepheid assay, based on availability. Patients with positive test results undergoing elective surgery had their procedures rescheduled, while patients scheduled for nonelective surgery underwent surgery regardless of their test results. Additionally, we reviewed the records of all patients at 30 days postoperatively for emergency room visits, readmissions, and COVID-19-related complications via electronic medical records and surgeon-reported complications. However, we had no method for definitively determining how many patients had complications, emergency department visits, or readmissions outside our system, so our event rate estimates for these endpoints are necessarily best-case estimates. RESULTS: A total of 0.5% (7 of 1276) of the patients tested positive for COVID-19: five via the Roche assay and two via the Abbott assay. Patients with positive test results were younger than those with negative results (39 ± 12 years versus 56 ± 16 years; p = 0.01). With the numbers available, we found no difference in the proportion of patients with positive test results for COVID-19 based on subspecialty area (examining the lowest and highest point estimates, respectively, we observed: trauma surgery [3%; 2 of 68 patients] versus hip and knee [0.3%; 1 of 401 patients], OR 12 [95% CI 1-135]; p = 0.06). No patients with negative preoperative test results for COVID-19 developed a symptomatic COVID-19 infection within 30 days postoperatively. Within 30 days of surgery, 0.9% (11 of 1276) of the patients presented to the emergency room, and 1.3% (16 of 1276) were readmitted for non-COVID-19-related complications. None of the patients with positive test results for COVID-19 preoperatively experienced complications. However, because some were likely treated outside our healthcare system, the actual percentages may be higher. CONCLUSION: Because younger patients are more likely to be asymptomatic carriers of disease, surgeons should emphasize the importance of taking proper precautions to prevent virus exposure preoperatively. Because the rates of COVID-19 infection differ based on city and time, surgeons should monitor the local prevalence of disease to properly advise patients on the risk of COVID-19 exposure. Further investigation is required to assess the prevalence in the orthopaedic population in cities with larger COVID-19 burdens. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, therapeutic study.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
5.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 163(2): 307-315, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459465

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Limited research exists on the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic pertaining to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS). The present study seeks to understand the response of OHNS workflows in the context of policy changes and to contribute to developing preparatory guidelines for perioperative management in OHNS. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Pediatric and general adult academic medical centers and a Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: OHNS cases from March 18 to April 8, 2020-the 3 weeks immediately following the Ohio state-mandated suspension of all elective surgery on March 18, 2020-were compared with a 2019 control data set. RESULTS: During this time, OHNS at the general adult and pediatric medical centers and CCC experienced 87.8%, 77.1%, and 32% decreases in surgical procedures as compared with 2019, respectively. Aerosol-generating procedures accounted for 86.8% of general adult cases, 92.4% of pediatric cases, and 62.0% of CCC cases. Preoperative COVID-19 testing occurred in 7.1% of general adult, 9% of pediatric, and 6.9% of CCC cases. The majority of procedures were tiers 3a and 3b per the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Aerosol-protective personal protective equipment (PPE) was worn in 28.6% of general adult, 90% of pediatric, and 15.5% of CCC cases. CONCLUSION: For OHNS, the majority of essential surgical cases remained high-risk aerosol-generating procedures. Preoperative COVID-19 testing and intraoperative PPE usage were initially inconsistent; systemwide guidelines were developed rapidly but lagged behind recommendations of the OHNS department and its academy. OHNS best practice standards are needed for preoperative COVID-19 status screening and PPE usage as we begin national reopening.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aerosols , Aged , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Elective Surgical Procedures/legislation & jurisprudence , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Ohio , Otolaryngology , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Preoperative Care/standards , Retrospective Studies , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Oral Oncol ; 107: 104835, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-436353
7.
Urolithiasis ; 48(4): 345-351, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324442

ABSTRACT

Stone disease is a unique condition that requires appropriate management in a timely manner as it can result in both emergent conditions and long term effects on kidney functions. In this study it is aimed to identify the up-to-date practice patterns related to preoperative evaluation and anesthesia for stone disease interventions during COVID-19 pandemic. The data of 473 patients from 11 centers in 5 different countries underwent interventions for urinary stones during the Covid-19 pandemic was collected and analyzed retrospectively. Information on the type of the stone related conditions, management strategies, anesthesiologic evaluation, anesthesia methods, and any alterations related to COVID-19 pandemic was collected. During the preoperative anesthesia evaluation thorax CT was performed in 268 (56.7%) and PCR from nasopharyngeal swab was performed in 31 (6.6%) patients. General anesthesia was applied in 337 (71.2%) patients and alteration in the method of anesthesia was recorded in 45 (9.5%) patients. A cut-off value of 21 days was detected for the hospitals to adapt changes related to COVID-19. Rate of preoperative testing, emergency procedures, conservative approaches and topical/regional anesthesia increased after 21 days. The preoperative evaluation for management of urinary stone disease is significantly affected by COVID-19 pandemic. There is significant alteration in anesthesia methods and interventions. The optimal methods for preoperative evaluation are still unknown and there is discordance between different centers. It takes 21 days for hospitals and surgeons to adapt and develop new strategies for preoperative evaluation and management of stones.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/trends , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Preoperative Care/trends , Urinary Calculi/therapy , Adult , Aged , Anesthesia/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nephrolithotomy, Percutaneous/statistics & numerical data , Postoperative Complications/virology , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data
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