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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715310

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to test the flow from long working hours to sickness presenteeism behavior and its outcomes for employees, while integrating intrinsic and extrinsic work value orientations as moderators in the process. We employed a two-wave design with a five-month interval. Data were obtained from 275 employees in Taiwan. The results of latent moderated structural equations (LMS) revealed that long working hours were positively associated with presenteeism, which in turn was negatively related to employees' well-being and job performance. Furthermore, the negative indirect effect of working long hours on job performance via presenteeism was weaker for those with a higher intrinsic work value orientation. The negative indirect effect of working long hours on well-being via presenteeism was weaker for those with a higher extrinsic work value orientation. We demonstrated that the long-term impact of presenteeism behavior could be understood by viewing work value orientations as resource gains to compensate resource depletion in a demanding work context. This resource dynamism is pivotal to realizing the functional or dysfunctional outcomes of presenteeism behavior. Theoretical and managerial implications of the findings for employees' well-being and organizational effectiveness are discussed.


Subject(s)
Presenteeism , Workplace , Taiwan
2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 812737, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662638

ABSTRACT

Background: In China, sickness presenteeism, job burnout, and fatigue are common among nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. We propose the prevalence of sickness presenteeism can adversely affect nurses' physical and mental health, negatively impact their work productivity and quality, and pose a threat to patients' safety. Therefore, this study examines the mechanism of productivity loss caused by sickness presenteeism, fatigue, and job burnout. Objectives: To investigate the serial-multiple mediating effect of job burnout and fatigue in the relationship between sickness presenteeism and productivity loss among nurses. Methods: A multicenter cross-sectional survey was undertaken by administering an online questionnaire from December 2020 to May 2021. Stratified cluster sampling was used to include 3,491 nurses from 14 hospitals in Shandong Province, China. Variables were measured using the Sickness Presenteeism Questionnaire, Stanford Presenteeism Scale, Chalder Fatigue Scale, and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Data analyses were carried out using descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, independent-samples t-test, Pearson correlation analysis, hierarchical regression, and bootstrapping method. Results: From the 3,491 nurses who volunteered in this online survey, only 2,968 valid questionnaires were returned. Sickness presenteeism exhibited a prevalence of 70.6% during the COVID-19 pandemic. The average score of health-related productivity loss was 15.05 ± 4.52, fatigue was 8.48 ± 3.40, and job burnout was 39.14 ± 19.64. Sickness presenteeism was positively associated with fatigue and job burnout while job burnout was positively associated with nurse fatigue. Sickness presenteeism, fatigue, and job burnout were also positively correlated with health-related productivity loss. Statistically significant paths via the single mediation of fatigue and job burnout were established. A statistically significant serial-multiple mediating effect of fatigue and job burnout on the association between sickness presenteeism and productivity loss accounted for 35.12% of the total effect size. Conclusions: There was a high incidence of sickness presenteeism and job burnout among Chinese nurses. High-frequency sickness presenteeism may result in increased productivity loss through the two mediating effects of fatigue and job burnout. Sickness presenteeism may increase fatigue, promote job burnout, and result in increased productivity loss among Chinese nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Occup Health ; 64(1): e12313, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626927

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between interruption to routine medical care during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and sickness presenteeism among workers in Japan. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using data obtained from an internet monitor questionnaire was conducted. Interruption to medical care was defined based on the response "I have not been able to go to the hospital or receive treatment as scheduled." The fraction of sickness presenteeism days in the past 30 days was employed as the primary outcome. A fractional logit model was used for analysis to treat bounded data. RESULTS: Of the 27 036 participants, 17 526 (65%) were workers who did not require routine medical care, 8451 (31%) were using medical care as scheduled, and 1059 (4%) experienced interrupted medical care. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of sickness presenteeism was significantly higher among workers who experienced interrupted medical care (3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.04-3.89) than those who did not require routine medical care. In terms of symptoms, the highest aOR was observed among workers with mental health symptoms (aOR: 5.59, 95% CI: 5.04-6.20). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests the importance of continuing necessary treatment during a pandemic to prevent presenteeism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Presenteeism , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(1): e1-e7, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606465

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We examined the association between socioeconomic and health status, and lifestyle and sickness presenteeism among Japanese workers during the COVID-19 epidemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using an Internet-monitor survey was conducted in December, 2020 in Japan. Of 33,302 survey participants, we analyzed 27,036 participants (13,814 men and 13,222 women) who reported experience with sickness presenteeism. RESULTS: The odds ratio (OR) of sickness presenteeism associated with unmarried versus married status was 1.15. Respective figures for other variables were 1.11 for manual laboring work compared to desk work; 1.79 and 2.29 for loss of employment at the time the pandemic began and continuation of unemployment compared with maintaining employment during the pandemic; and 3.34 for a feeling of financial instability compared with stability. CONCLUSION: The issue of sickness presenteeism has become more prominent under the COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e050068, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583113

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused medical care delays and avoidance around the globe. However, little is known about the relationship between disrupted care and productivity loss attributed to presenteeism during the COVID-19 pandemic. We aimed to investigate whether disrupted care during the COVID-19 state of emergency was associated with health status and productivity loss. METHODS: We used data from a nationwide, cross-sectional, Internet-based, self-administered survey. We performed multiple logistic regression analysis on data from 14 545 participants to investigate the associations among variables related to disrupted care, health status and the Work Functioning Impairment Scale, with a cut-off of 21 points. RESULTS: Participants who experienced exacerbation of underlying disease (adjusted OR (aOR) 2.84; 95% CI 2.28 to 3.53) or any type of disrupted care were more likely to show low productivity at work. Experiencing disruptions in routine and non-routine clinical settings (aOR 4.64; 95% CI 3.64 to 5.92 and aOR 6.29; 95% CI 4.74 to 8.34, respectively), and running out of drugs (aOR 6.13; 95% CI 4.60 to 8.18) were strongly associated with exacerbation of underlying disease. CONCLUSIONS: Workers who experienced disrupted care were much more likely to show productivity loss. Exacerbation of underlying disease is one possible pathway through which disrupted care could affect productivity loss attributed to presenteeism. Our study provides evidence of the importance of early diagnosis and continuous treatment of non-COVID-19 patients to enable them to remain healthy and continue to work during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 11 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542547

ABSTRACT

Public health movement and social restrictions imposed by the Australian and New Zealand governments in response to the COVID-19 pandemic influenced the working environment and may have affected health behaviours, work ability, and job performance. The aim of this study was to determine the associations between health behaviours and work ability and performance during COVID-19 restrictions and if health behaviours were related to demographic or population factors. A cross-sectional survey was used to gather responses from 433 adult employees in Australia and New Zealand between June and August 2020. The survey requested demographic information and used the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Work Ability Index, and the World Health Organisation's Health and Work Performance Questionnaire. Multivariate regression models were used to explore relationships between the identified variables while controlling for several possible confounders. Being sufficiently physically active was associated with higher reported physical (aOR = 2.1; p = 0.001) and mental work abilities (aOR = 1.8; p = 0.007) and self-reported job performance (i.e., lower presenteeism) (median +7.42%; p = 0.03). Part-time employees were 56% less likely (p = 0.002) to report a good or very good mental work ability. Those with existing medical conditions were 14% less likely (p = 0.008) to be sufficiently active and 80% less likely (p = 0.002) to report rather good or very good physical work ability. Being sufficiently active was associated with higher physical and mental work abilities and better job performance during the COVID-19 pandemic. Employers should support opportunities for regular physical activity and provide specific support to individuals with medical conditions or in part-time employment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Absenteeism , Adult , Australia , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Humans , New Zealand , Pandemics , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2 , Work Capacity Evaluation
7.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1179, 2021 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526632

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV can generate costs both within and outside the health sector (i.e. intersectoral costs). This systematic review aims (i) to explore the intersectoral costs associated with STIs and HIV considered in cost-of-illness (COI) studies, (ii) to categorise and analyse these costs according to cost sectors, and (iii) to illustrate the impact of intersectoral costs on the total cost burden. METHODS: Medline (PubMed), EMBASE (Ovid), Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EconLit and NHS EED were searched between 2009 and 2019. Key search terms included terms for cost-of-illness, cost analysis and all terms for STIs including specific infections. Studies were included that assessed intersectoral costs. A standardised data extraction form was adopted. A cost component table was established based on pre-defined sector-specific classification schemes. Cost results for intersectoral costs were recorded. The quality of studies was assessed using a modified version of the CHEC-list. RESULTS: 75 COI studies were considered for title/abstract screening. Only six studies were available in full-text and eligible for data extraction and narrative synthesis. Intersectoral costs were captured in the following sectors: Patient & family, Informal care and Productivity (Paid Labour). Patient & family costs were addressed in four studies, including patient out-of-pocket payments/co-payments and travel costs. Informal care costs including unpaid (home) care support by family/friends and other caregiver costs were considered in three studies. All six studies estimated productivity costs for paid labour including costs in terms of absenteeism, disability, cease-to-work, presenteeism and premature death. Intersectoral costs largely contributed to the total economic cost burden of STIs and HIV. The quality assessment revealed methodological differences. CONCLUSIONS: It is evident that intersectoral costs associated with STIs and HIV are substantial. If relevant intersectoral costs are not included in cost analyses the total cost burden of STIs and HIV to society is severely underestimated. Therefore, intersectoral costs need to be addressed in order to ensure the total economic burden of STIs and HIV on society is assessed, and communicated to policy/decision-makers.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Caregivers , Cost of Illness , Humans , Presenteeism
8.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1955, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496158

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Workplace transmission is a significant contributor to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreaks. Previous studies have found that infectious illness presenteeism could contribute to outbreaks in occupational settings and identified multiple occupational and organisational risk factors. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative to investigate presenteeism particularly in relation to respiratory infectious disease (RID). Hence, this rapid review aims to determine the prevalence of RID-related presenteeism, including COVID-19, and examines the reported reasons and associated risk factors. METHODS: The review followed a Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) search approach and focused on studies published in English and Chinese. Database searches included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI) and preprint databases MedRxiv and BioRxiv. RESULTS: The search yielded 54 studies, of which four investigated COVID-19-related presenteeism. Prevalence of work presenteeism ranged from 14.1 to 55% for confirmed RID, and 6.6 to 100% for those working with suspected or subclinical RID. The included studies demonstrated that RID-related presenteeism is associated with occupation, sick pay policy, age, gender, health behaviour and perception, vaccination, peer pressure and organisational factors such as presenteeism culture. CONCLUSIONS: This review demonstrates that presenteeism or non-adherence to isolation guidance is a real concern and can contribute to workplace transmissions and outbreaks. Policies which would support workers financially and improve productivity, should include a range of effective non-pharmaceutical inventions such as workplace testing, promoting occupational health services, reviewing pay and bonus schemes and clear messaging to encourage workers to stay at home when ill. Future research should focus on the more vulnerable and precarious occupational groups, and their inter-relationships, to develop comprehensive intervention programs to reduce RID-related presenteeism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Humans , Pandemics , Presenteeism , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(3): 243-249, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470183

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Previous research found increased sickness presenteeism (working despite sickness) associated with home-based telework. The Covid-19 pandemic offers new insights into mechanisms, as a large proportion of the workforce was forced to work from home, irrespective of organizational and individual predispositions. METHODS: A path analysis based on survey data from a sample of teleworkers collected during the Covid-crisis was performed. RESULTS: We found no general relationship between telework and sickness presenteeism. However, employees with telework experience before the pandemic use telework more often for work intensification which is associated with increased sickness presenteeism. As teleworking before the pandemic is associated with indirect work control (goal-directed management), indirect effects of such work organizations on presenteeism were confirmed. CONCLUSION: As hypothesized in prior research, indirect work control may increase self-endangering behavior which is amplified by telework.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Teleworking , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(16)2021 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348631

ABSTRACT

The recruitment and retention of health professionals in rural Australia is well documented. The COVID-19 pandemic has further exposed the precariousness of human healthcare resources within small rural communities. The external disaster of the COVID-19 outbreak described in this case analysis exacerbated the frail balance of sustaining adequate staffing levels and skill mix, which exposed behaviours of presenteeism within rural healthcare teams. An analysis of the complex of factors that led to the first nosocomial outbreak of COVID-19 within a healthcare environment in Australia demonstrates how rural healthcare environments are ill-equipped to meet the demands of unexpected external disasters. Using the Haddon Matrix to examine the factors that led to this outbreak provides us with the opportunity to learn from the case analysis. Health professional presenteeism contributed to the North West Tasmania COVID-19 outbreak and affected the hospital and health service provision within the region. Recommendations to mitigate risk for future disaster planning in rural healthcare environments include improved infection control strategies and a whole-community approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Presenteeism , Rural Health Services , Australia/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Rural Population
11.
Am J Infect Control ; 49(8): 1021-1023, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317618

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The scale of the COVID-19 pandemic has required rapid development of both governmental and institutional policies and protocols to minimize transmission. We describe our institution's implementation of a symptom monitoring program with this goal. METHODS: We developed a symptom monitoring tool based on our return-to-work guidelines using a Qualtrics survey tool. We implemented this for healthcare workers (HCWs) and provided individualized real time guidance and linkage to COVID-19 testing if indicated. RESULTS: During the period from April 2nd to April 17th, 2020, 9446 HCWs had enrolled in the symptom tracking survey, with 5,035 HCWs completing the survey daily at the end of this period. 1,318 HCWs had been identified as being symptomatic with an indication for SARS-CoV-2 testing and were directed to the hotline to have this ordered. Of these, 82% reported not currently staying home from work due to illness or quarantine when first reporting symptoms. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: A survey based symptom monitoring tool can be rapidly designed and implemented, and incorporated with a testing strategy. Our results show the potential for quick uptake, and effectiveness in identifying and addressing presenteeism. We report our large academic institution's experience as a model to be adapted for use in this and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(29)2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306503

ABSTRACT

We study US sick leave use and unaddressed sick leave needs in the midst of the global severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS COV 2) pandemic based on a representative survey. More than half of all US employees are unaware of the new emergency sick leave options provided by the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Awareness and take-up rates are significantly higher among Asian Americans and lower among the foreign-born. About 8 million employees used emergency sick leave in the first 6 to 8 mo. Nevertheless, the share of employees who needed but could not take paid sick leave tripled in the pandemic; unaddressed sick leave needs total 15 million employees per month and are 69% higher among women. Our findings show that access to paid sick leave significantly reduces unaddressed sick leave needs. We conclude that given the fragmented US sick leave landscape, to address the strong increase in unaddressed sick leave needs during the pandemic, federal FFCRA response was not adequate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Needs Assessment , Presenteeism/statistics & numerical data , Sick Leave/statistics & numerical data , Awareness , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Facilities and Services Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , United States
13.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(5): 363-368, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301398

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We sought to understand barriers to staying home from work when sick from COVID-19 (COVID-19 presenteeism) to understand COVID-19 health disparities and transmission and guide workplace and social policy. METHODS: We used logistic regression models to assess which socioeconomic factors were associated with intended COVID-19 presenteeism among an online study population working outside their home in March 2020 (N = 220). RESULTS: Overall, 34.5% of participants reported intended COVID-19 presenteeism. Younger individuals and individuals making over $90,000 per year were less likely to report COVID-19 presenteeism. Individuals who were worried about having enough food had 3-fold higher odds of intended COVID-19 presenteeism. CONCLUSION: Current policies around food access, paid sick leave, and other workplace protections need to be expanded and made more accessible to reduce health disparities as well as the transmission of COVID-19 and other infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Intention , Presenteeism/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/economics , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Presenteeism/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(9)2021 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231457

ABSTRACT

Complaints of cognitive functions (CCFs), defined as subjective cognitive dysfunction, affect social function; additionally, for workers, this condition is an important factor in presenteeism and mediates the effect of depressive symptoms on presenteeism. This study aimed to investigate whether CCFs mediate the relationships among insomnia, state anxiety (SA), and presenteeism. Participants were 471 Japanese adult workers evaluated using the Athens Insomnia Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Form Y), Cognitive Complaints in Bipolar Disorder Rating Assessment, and Work Limitations Questionnaire 8 to assess insomnia, SA, CCFs, and presenteeism, respectively. Path analysis was used to evaluate the correlations between variables. CCFs significantly mediated the associations among insomnia, SA, and presenteeism. To address the presenteeism associated with insomnia and SA, it may be useful to assess the mediating roles of CCFs.


Subject(s)
Presenteeism , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cognition , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
15.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(8): 713-718, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223403

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To test the role of workplace coronavirus disease (COVID-19) climate in shaping employee attitudes toward the CDC prevention guidelines and subsequent levels of work and non-work sickness presenteeism. METHODS: Three waves of anonymous survey data were collected in October and December 2020 and February 2021. Participants were 304 employed adults in the U.S., of whom half were working onsite. RESULTS: Time 1 workplace COVID-19 climate was positively associated with Time 2 employee attitudes toward the CDC prevention guidelines, which in turn predicted Time 3 levels of non-work and work sickness presenteeism. CONCLUSIONS: The workplace can shape employee attitudes toward the CDC COVID-19 prevention guidelines and their work and non-work sickness presenteeism, thus highlighting the important role companies have in reducing community spread of the novel coronavirus in work and non-work settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Presenteeism , Absenteeism , Adult , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
17.
Vaccine ; 39(17): 2366-2374, 2021 04 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157774

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Healthcare personnel (HCP) have an increased risk of exposure to influenza and other respiratory pathogens. Increased presenteeism, decreased absenteeism, and low uptake of the influenza vaccine can contribute to the spread of influenza among HCP in healthcare settings. We used a mixed methods approach to investigate attitudes and behaviors of HCP in Israel towards influenza vaccination, presenteeism, and absenteeism. METHODS: The study took place over three influenza seasons (2016-2017, 2017-2018, 2018-2019) at the largest hospital in southern Israel. We administered a Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) questionnaire and conducted semi-structured interviews with HCP who had been recently ill with respiratory symptoms. The KAP questionnaire included closed-ended questions about attitudes and behaviors regarding influenza, working while sick, and influenza vaccination. The interviews investigated HCP's perceptions of influenza infection and attitudes about absenteeism, presenteeism, and the influenza vaccine. RESULTS: We conducted 74 semi-structured interviews over three influenza seasons. Four HCP were interviewed twice, in separate seasons for different illness episodes. The 70 individuals interviewed included 16 physicians, 45 nurses or technicians, and 9 administrative staff. The median age was 42.5 years (range: 25-60), and most (79%) were female. Half (50%) got vaccinated against influenza before their illness episode. In interviews, most HCP said they come to work while sick (presenteeism) due to a strong personal work ethic and an institutional culture that discourages taking sick leave (absenteeism). HCP expressed skepticism about the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine as well as concern that the influenza vaccine causes severe illness. DISCUSSION: Over three influenza seasons in Israel, HCP cited a number of reasons for working while sick, and doubted the usefulness of influenza vaccine. Addressing reasons for presenteeism and vaccine hesitancy among HCP is crucial to protect HCP and patients from influenza virus infection and other viral respiratory illnesses, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Absenteeism , Adult , Attitude , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Israel , Male , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
18.
Int Nurs Rev ; 67(4): 466-475, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066699

ABSTRACT

AIM: To compare presenteeism levels among three samples of nurses and to identify the relationship between presenteeism and sociodemographic and professional characteristics. BACKGROUND: Presenteeism (going to work ill) is a phenomenon studied from different perspectives, and it has become especially important during the current COVID-19 outbreak; its connection to high healthcare costs, patient safety breaches and negative nurse well-being has been proved. INTRODUCTION: The nursing profession is particularly associated with caring for the culture of teamwork, loyalty to colleagues and professional identity. This condition enhances the 'super nurse phenomenon', even though nurses do not feel physically and psychologically able to work. METHODS: A multicentre, cross-sectional study was conducted in three different country contexts: Oviedo (Spain), Porto (Portugal) and São Paulo (Brazil). Nurses performing functions in hospitals and primary health care were enrolled. Informed consent and data collection questionnaires were hand delivered. The Stanford Presenteeism Scale-6 was applied. RESULTS: A total of 659 nurses participated. Portuguese nurses showed greater prevalence of presenteeism, followed by Brazilian and Spanish nurses. Younger nurses with less professional experience presented lower levels of presenteeism but greater psychological commitment. Male participants showed lower capacity to complete work when ill than female participants. CONCLUSIONS: Age and length of professional experience proved to be significant predictors of total presenteeism, although only professional experience revealed statistical significance in the adjusted model. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICY: The knowledge of this phenomenon among nurses highlights the need for the development of strategies in the curriculum of nursing students and organizations. Resilience and ergonomic training should be applied in the training programmes of the students and reinforced by the health centre managers. It is essential that healthcare systems design worksite wellness programmes that pursue greater physical and mental well-being for healthcare professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Presenteeism/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Age Factors , Brazil , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nurse's Role/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Portugal , Risk Factors , Spain
19.
Occup Med (Lond) ; 71(6-7): 243-244, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933870
20.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(4): 388-391, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889081

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Presenteeism is an expensive and challenging problem in the healthcare industry. In anticipation of the staffing challenges expected with the COVID-19 pandemic, we examined a decade of payroll data for a healthcare workforce. We aimed to determine the effect of seasonal influenza-like illness (ILI) on absences to support COVID-19 staffing plans. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Large academic medical center in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Employees of the academic medical center who were on payroll between the years of 2009 and 2019. METHODS: Biweekly institutional payroll data was evaluated for unscheduled absences as a marker for acute illness-related work absences. Linear regression models, stratified by payroll status (salaried vs hourly employees) were developed for unscheduled absences as a function of local ILI. RESULTS: Both hours worked and unscheduled absences were significantly related to the community prevalence of influenza-like illness in our cohort. These effects were stronger in hourly employees. CONCLUSIONS: Organizations should target their messaging at encouraging salaried staff to stay home when ill.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Presenteeism/statistics & numerical data , Workforce , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Epidemics , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Minnesota/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
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