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1.
Wound Repair Regen ; 30(2): 190-197, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854206

ABSTRACT

Preventing recurrent pressure ulcers is an important challenge in healthcare. One of the reasons for the high rate of recurrent pressure ulcers is the lack of assessment methods for their early detection. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the thermographic characteristics of the healed area and to consider the predictive validity of thermographic images for recurrent pressure ulcers within a 2-week period. This observational study was conducted at a long-term care facility in Japan between July 2017 and February 2019 among patients whose pressure ulcers had healed. Thermographic images of the healed area were recorded once a week until recurrence or until the end of the study. We enrolled 30 participants, among whom 8 developed recurrent pressure ulcers. The generalised estimation equation revealed that the thermographic finding of increased temperature at the healed area compared to that of the surrounding skin was significantly associated with recurrent pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 101.13, 95% confidence interval: 3.60-2840.77, p = .007); the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio for recurrent pressure ulcers within 2 weeks were 0.80, 0.94, 0.62, 0.97, 12.9 and 0.2, respectively. Our thermographic findings revealed that the temperature of the healed area was higher than that of the surrounding skin; this could be a useful predictor of pressure ulcer recurrence within 2 weeks, even in the absence of macroscopic changes.


Subject(s)
Pressure Ulcer , Humans , Pressure Ulcer/diagnosis , Skin , Temperature , Thermography , Wound Healing
3.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0264139, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690689

ABSTRACT

A pressure ulcer is an injury of the skin and underlying tissues adjacent to a bony eminence. Patients who suffer from this disease may have difficulty accessing medical care. Recently, the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated this situation. Automatic diagnosis based on machine learning (ML) brings promising solutions. Traditional ML requires complicated preprocessing steps for feature extraction. Its clinical applications are thus limited to particular datasets. Deep learning (DL), which extracts features from convolution layers, can embrace larger datasets that might be deliberately excluded in traditional algorithms. However, DL requires large sets of domain specific labeled data for training. Labeling various tissues of pressure ulcers is a challenge even for experienced plastic surgeons. We propose a superpixel-assisted, region-based method of labeling images for tissue classification. The boundary-based method is applied to create a dataset for wound and re-epithelialization (re-ep) segmentation. Five popular DL models (U-Net, DeeplabV3, PsPNet, FPN, and Mask R-CNN) with encoder (ResNet-101) were trained on the two datasets. A total of 2836 images of pressure ulcers were labeled for tissue classification, while 2893 images were labeled for wound and re-ep segmentation. All five models had satisfactory results. DeeplabV3 had the best performance on both tasks with a precision of 0.9915, recall of 0.9915 and accuracy of 0.9957 on the tissue classification; and a precision of 0.9888, recall of 0.9887 and accuracy of 0.9925 on the wound and re-ep segmentation task. Combining segmentation results with clinical data, our algorithm can detect the signs of wound healing, monitor the progress of healing, estimate the wound size, and suggest the need for surgical debridement.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Deep Learning , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Neural Networks, Computer , Pressure Ulcer/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Pressure Ulcer/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Taiwan/epidemiology
4.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 34(8): 1-3, 2021 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201587

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Prone positioning is recognized for its efficacy in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome related to COVID-19. Here the authors present a case of a facial pressure injury and buried dentition that occurred as a result of prolonged prone positioning in a patient who was COVID-19 positive. The patient was treated with primary closure of the injury and pressure offloading.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Facial Injuries/surgery , Patient Positioning/adverse effects , Pressure Ulcer/surgery , Prone Position , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Dentition , Facial Injuries/diagnosis , Facial Injuries/etiology , Humans , Male , Pressure Ulcer/diagnosis , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects
5.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(9): 2141-2148, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-987177

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, prone position (PP) has been frequently used in the intensive care units to improve the prognosis in patients with respiratory distress. However, turning patients to prone imply important complications such as pressure ulcers. The aim of this paper is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of prone-positioning pressure sores (PPPS) and analyze the related risk factors. METHODS: A case-control study was performed in Gregorio Maranon hospital in Madrid during the COVID-19 pandemic between April and May 2020. We enrolled 74 confirmed COVID-19 patients in critical care units with invasive mechanical ventilation who were treated with pronation therapy. There were 57 cases and 17 controls. Demographic data, pronation maneuver characteristics and PPPS features were analyzed. RESULTS: In the case group, a total number of 136 PPPS were recorded. The face was the most affected region (69%). Regarding the severity, stage II was the most frequent. The main variables associated with an increased risk of PPPS were the total number of days under pronation cycles, and PP maintained for more than 24 h. The prealbumin level at admission was significantly lower in the case group. All of the ulcers were treated with dressings. The most frequent acute complication was bleeding (5%). CONCLUSIONS: According to our study, PPPS are related to the characteristics of the maneuver and the previous nutritional state. The implementation of improved positioning protocols may enhance results in critical patient caring, to avoid the scars and social stigma that these injuries entail.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Patient Positioning/adverse effects , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Positioning/methods , Pressure Ulcer/diagnosis , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Prevalence , Prone Position , Respiration, Artificial , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Spain
6.
J Stomatol Oral Maxillofac Surg ; 122(6): 625-628, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-838090

ABSTRACT

Pressure ulcers of the lip constitute a rare entity faced by plastic surgeons and there is a relatively paucity of data regarding optimal management. In this study we present one case of upper lip pressure ulcer related to prone intubation for respiratory distress due to SARS-CoV-2 infection, treated with surgical excision and reconstruction. We also performed a review of the literature to identify other studies on pressure lip ulcers. Six studies were considered relevant. Conservative management constitutes the most common method of treatment; however, little is known about the aesthetic, and functional morbidity related to either surgical or non-surgical treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Humans , Lip/surgery , Pressure Ulcer/diagnosis , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 33(8): 410-417, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671109

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine use in the field of wound care had been increasing in popularity when the novel coronavirus 2019 paralyzed the globe in early 2020. To combat the constraints of healthcare delivery during this time, the use of telemedicine has been further expanded. Although many limitations of telemedicine are still being untangled, the benefits of virtual care are being realized in both inpatient and outpatient settings. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of telemedicine are discussed through two case examples that highlight the promise of implementation during and beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/therapy , Surgical Wound Dehiscence/surgery , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Wound Healing/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pressure Ulcer/diagnosis , Quality Improvement , Risk Assessment , Surgical Wound Dehiscence/diagnosis , Treatment Outcome
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