Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 35
Filter
1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(18): e33615, 2023 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318959

ABSTRACT

Critical patients have conditions that may favor the occurrence of hospital-acquired pressure injury (HAPI). The objective of this study was to identify the incidence and factors associated with the occurrence of HAPI in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) who used the prone position. Retrospective cohort study carried out in an ICU of a tertiary university hospital. Two hundred four patients with positive real-time polymerase chain reactions were evaluated, of which 84 were placed in the prone position. All patients were sedated and submitted to invasive mechanical ventilation. Of the prone patients, 52 (62%) developed some type of HAPI during hospitalization. The main place of occurrence of HAPI was the sacral region, followed by the gluteus and thorax. Of the patients who developed HAPI, 26 (50%) had this event in places possibly associated with the prone position. The factors associated with the occurrence of HAPI in patients prone to coronavirus disease 2019 were the Braden Scale and the length of stay in the ICU. The incidence of HAPI in prone patients was extremely high (62%), which denotes the need to implement protocols in order to prevent the occurrence of these events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Incidence , Prone Position , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Hospitals
2.
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs ; 50(3): 197-202, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314062

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and placed in a prone position manually or using a specialty bed designed to facilitate prone positioning. A secondary aim was to compare mortality rates between these groups. DESIGN: Retrospective review of electronic medical records. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: The sample comprised 160 patients with ARDS managed by prone positioning. Their mean age was 61.08 years (SD = 12.73); 58% (n = 96) were male. The study setting was a 355-bed community hospital in the Western United States (Stockton, California). Data were collected from July 2019 to January 2021. METHODS: Data from electronic medical records were retrospectively searched for the development of pressure injuries, mortality, hospital length of stay, oxygenation status when placed in a prone position, and the presence of a COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: A majority of patients with ARDS were manually placed in a prone position (n = 106; 64.2%), and 54 of these patients (50.1%) were placed using a specialty care bed. Slightly more than half (n = 81; 50.1%) developed HAPIs. Chi-square analyses showed no association with the incidence of HAPIs using manual prone positioning versus the specialty bed (P = .9567). Analysis found no difference in HAPI occurrences between those with COVID-19 and patients without a coronavirus infection (P = .8462). Deep-tissue pressure injuries were the most common type of pressure injury. More patients (n = 85; 80.19%) who were manually placed in a prone position died compared to 58.18% of patients (n = 32) positioned using the specialty bed (P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: No differences in HAPI rates were found when placing patients manually in a prone position versus positioning using a specialty bed designed for this purpose.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Adult , Male , Middle Aged , Female , Retrospective Studies , Prone Position , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Pressure Ulcer/complications , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Hospitals , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects
3.
Surgeon ; 20(4): e144-e148, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2307830

ABSTRACT

The utilisation of prone positioning has been vital during the COVID-19 pandemic, however risks the development of anterior pressure ulcers. An observational study was performed to examine the prevalence of pressure ulcers in this population and define risk factors. Eighty-seven patients admitted to critical care were studied. Of 62 patients with >1 day in prone position, 55 (88.7%) developed anterior pressure ulcers, 91% of which were anterior. The most commonly affected site were the oral commisures (34.6%), related to endotracheal tube placement. Prone positioning (p < .001) and the number of days prone (OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.46-6.62, p = 0.003) were a significant risk factors in development of an anterior ulcer. Prone positioning is therefore a significant cause of anterior pressure ulcers in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Positioning/adverse effects , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Prone Position
4.
Front Immunol ; 14: 1031336, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300731

ABSTRACT

Hospitalized patients have an increased risk of developing hospital-acquired sacral pressure injury (HASPI). However, it is unknown whether SARS-CoV-2 infection affects HASPI development. To explore the role of SARS-CoV-2 infection in HASPI development, we conducted a single institution, multi-hospital, retrospective study of all patients hospitalized for ≥5 days from March 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020. Patient demographics, hospitalization information, ulcer characteristics, and 30-day-related morbidity were collected for all patients with HASPIs, and intact skin was collected from HASPI borders in a patient subset. We determined the incidence, disease course, and short-term morbidity of HASPIs in COVID-19(+) patients, and characterized the skin histopathology and tissue gene signatures associated with HASPIs in COVID-19 disease. COVID-19(+) patients had a 63% increased HASPI incidence rate, HASPIs of more severe ulcer stage (OR 2.0, p<0.001), and HASPIs more likely to require debridement (OR 3.1, p=0.04) compared to COVID-19(-) patients. Furthermore, COVID-19(+) patients with HASPIs had 2.2x increased odds of a more severe hospitalization course compared to COVID-19(+) patients without HASPIs. HASPI skin histology from COVID-19(+) patients predominantly showed thrombotic vasculopathy, with the number of thrombosed vessels being significantly greater than HASPIs from COVID-19(-) patients. Transcriptional signatures of a COVID-19(+) sample subset were enriched for innate immune responses, thrombosis, and neutrophil activation genes. Overall, our results suggest that immunologic dysregulation secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection, including neutrophil dysfunction and abnormal thrombosis, may play a pathogenic role in development of HASPIs in patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Thrombosis , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , Ulcer , Neutrophil Activation , Incidence , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Thrombosis/etiology , Hospitals
5.
J Wound Care ; 32(Sup3): S9-S16, 2023 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279649

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of patients with COVID-19 who developed pressure injuries (PIs), the characteristics of PIs experienced, and the incidence and prevalence of PIs among the patients with COVID-19. PIs are associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare expense. PIs have been reported among patients who have contracted COVID-19. Understanding the characteristics of COVID-19 patients, and how PIs are prevented and managed, may inform care and optimise the outcomes for COVID-19-positive patients. METHOD: A scoping review was conducted. All study designs, including grey literature, published in the English language from December 2019 to March 2021, reporting on patients with COVID-19 and PIs, were included. RESULTS: In total, 27 publications (n=4820 patients) were included in the review. The reported incidence rate of PIs was 7.3-77.0%. The causative factors noted were: prone positioning (28.5%); medical devices (21.4%); and medical devices used during prone positioning (14.2%). The most common PI sites were the cheeks (18.7%). PIs occurred on average at 14.7 days post-acute care admission. Of the PIs where staging information was specified (67.7%), the most common was Stage 2/II (45.2%). PI risk may intensify on account of the intrinsic mechanism of COVID-19-associated intensive care treatment. CONCLUSION: PI prevention and management should be prioritised for patients with COVID-19, given the reported high prevalence of PIs and exacerbated risk arising from the use of prone position and medical devices. Further research is required to understand the association between COVID-19 and PIs, and to guide effective prevention and treatment approaches.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Critical Care , Delivery of Health Care , Prevalence
6.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 36(4): 1-6, 2023 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2277154

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This retrospective study aimed to describe the characteristics of patients treated at a COVID-19 referral hospital from March 2020 to June 2021 who experienced pressure injuries (PIs) either before or after admission. METHODS: The researchers collected and analyzed data on patients' demographic characteristics, symptoms, comorbidities, location and severity of PI, laboratory values, oxygen therapy, length of stay, and vasopressor use. RESULTS: During the study period, 1,070 patients were hospitalized for COVID-19 with varying degrees of severity, and 12 patients were diagnosed with PI. Eight (66.7%) of the patients with PI were men. The median age was 60 (range, 51-71) years, and half of the patients had obesity. Eleven of the patients with PI (91.4%) had at least one comorbid condition. The sacrum and gluteus were the two most commonly affected sites. Those with stage 3 PI had a substantially greater median d-dimer value (7,900 ng/mL) than patients with stage 2 PI (1,100 ng/mL). The average length of stay was 22 (range, 9.8-40.3) days. CONCLUSIONS: Health professionals should be aware of an increase in d-dimer in patients with COVID-19 and PI. Even though PIs in these patients might not result in mortality, an increase in morbidity can be avoided with the right care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Crush Injuries , Pressure Ulcer , Male , Humans , Middle Aged , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pressure Ulcer/diagnosis , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Hospitals
7.
Int J Nurs Pract ; 29(2): e13125, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2282750

ABSTRACT

AIM: To evaluate the incidence of facial pressure injuries in health-care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic in a meta-analysis. METHODS: Related studies were obtained through electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) Chinese Scientific Journal (VIP) China Biomedical Literature service systems (CBM) and Wanfang Data (from inception to 27 November 2021). The pooled incidence and the 95% confidence interval of facial pressure injuries were calculated with Review Manager v5.4 software. RESULTS: Overall, 16 studies with 14 430 health-care professionals were included. Pooled results showed that the pooled incidence of facial pressure injury in health-care professionals was 58.8% (95% CI: 49.0%-68.7%; p < 0.01). The results of the subgroup analysis showed that the incidence of facial pressure injury in these staff was high, and predominantly stage I pressure injury, in the following cases: in health-care professionals who wore personal protective equipment for longer than 4 h, in those without any training experience, and on the nose. CONCLUSION: Administrators and researchers should pay attention to preventing facial pressure injury related to the wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) by ensuring all health-care professionals receive training and by limiting prolonged periods of use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Pandemics , Incidence , Health Personnel
8.
Enferm Intensiva (Engl Ed) ; 34(2): 70-79, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2251275

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify adverse events related to prone positioning in COVID-19 patients with severe disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome, to analyze the risk factors associated with the development of anterior pressure ulcers, to determine whether the recommendation of prone positioning is associated with improved clinical outcomes. METHODS: Retrospective study performed in 63 consecutive patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to intensive care unit on invasive mechanical ventilation and treated with prone positioning between March and April 2020. Association between prone-related pressure ulcers and selected variables was explored by the means of logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 139 proning cycles were performed. The mean number of cycles were 2 [1-3] and the mean duration per cycle was of 22h [15-24]. The prevalence of adverse events this population was 84.9 %, being the physiologic ones (i.e., hypo/hypertension) the most prevalent. 29 out of 63 patients (46%) developed prone-related pressure ulcers. The risk factors for prone-related pressure ulcers were older age, hypertension, levels of pre-albumin <21mg/dl, the number of proning cycles and severe disease. We observed a significant increase in the PaO2/FiO2 at different time points during the prone positioning, and a significant decrease after it. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high incidence of adverse events due to PD, with the physiological type being the most frequent. The identification of the main risk factors for the development of prone-related pressure ulcers will help to prevent the occurrence of these lesions during the prone positioning. Prone positioning offered an improvement in the oxygenation in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Pressure Ulcer , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Prone Position/physiology , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Hypertension/complications
9.
J Tissue Viability ; 32(2): 206-212, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2235949

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the influencing factors of medical device related pressure injury (MDRPU) in medical staff by meta-analysis. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted by PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CNKI, VIP, CBM, and WanFang Data (from inception to July 27, 2022). Two researchers independently performed literature screening, quality evaluation and data extraction, and meta-analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.4 and Stata12.0 software. RESULTS: Total of 11215 medical staff were included in 9 articles. Meta analysis showed that gender, occupation, sweating, wearing time, single working time, department of COVID-19, preventive measures, and level 3 PPE were the risk factors for MDRPU in medical staff (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The outbreak of COVID-19 led to the occurrence of MDRPU among medical staff, and the influencing factors should be focused on. The medical administrator can further improve and standardize the preventive measures of MDRPU according to the influencing factors. Medical staff should accurately identify high-risk factors in the clinical work process, implement intervention measures, and reduce the incidence of MDRPU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Crush Injuries , Pressure Ulcer , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Risk Factors , Crush Injuries/complications
11.
Wounds ; 34(9): 220-222, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2058423

ABSTRACT

Responsibilities placed on nurses increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hospital-acquired PI monitoring was deferred in favor of more critical patient needs. It was hypothesized that a counterintuitive dip in HAPI reporting would be observed despite maximum hospital capacity across much of the United States. The electronic medical records of patients treated in the YNHH System between December 2017 and February 2021 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with HAPIs, defined as PIs not documented upon admission but subsequently present during the patient's hospital stay. Paired t test revealed a significantly lower number of reported incidents mid-pandemic than during the prepandemic baseline months (P <.0001). The data in this report show interdisciplinary clinician-led teams must continue to monitor for HAPIs and congruous conditions to minimize reporting gaps and progression in PI severity despite COVID-19 pandemic-related conditions and additional related responsibilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Iatrogenic Disease , Pandemics , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
12.
J Adv Nurs ; 78(12): 4042-4053, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1886682

ABSTRACT

AIM: To investigate the impact of family visit restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic on deliriums, falls, pneumonia, pressure ulcers and readmissions among surgical inpatients with gastrointestinal (oncologic) diseases. DESIGN: Cohort study. METHODS: This study was conducted among adult inpatients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery in two academic hospitals. During the COVID-19 outbreak in 2020, over a 10-week period, one cohort was subjected to family visit restrictions. Per patient, one person per day was allowed to visit for a maximum of 30 min. This cohort was compared with another cohort in which patients were not subjected to such restrictions during a 10-week period in 2019. Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the impact of the restrictions on deliriums, falls, pneumonia, pressure ulcers and readmissions. RESULTS: In total, 287 patients were included in the 2020 cohort and 243 in the 2019 cohort. No differences were observed in the cohorts with respect to baseline characteristics. Logistic regression analyses showed no significant differences in deliriums, falls, pneumonia, pressure ulcers and readmissions between the cohorts. CONCLUSION: We cautiously conclude that the family visit restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic did not contribute to deliriums, falls, pneumonia, pressure ulcers or readmissions in surgical patients with gastrointestinal (oncologic) diseases. IMPACT: COVID-19 influenced family-centred care due to family visit restrictions. Nurses need to continue monitoring outcomes known to be sensitive to family-centred care to gain insight into the effects of visit restrictions and share the results in order to include nurses' perspectives in COVID-19-decision-making. Re-implementing of family visit restrictions should be carefully considered in policy-making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia , Pressure Ulcer , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Policy
13.
J Tissue Viability ; 31(2): 213-220, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851676

ABSTRACT

AIM: This systematic review was carried out to examine pressure ulcers in healthcare staff due to the use of protective equipment during COVID-19 pandemic and the precautions taken to prevent these injuries. METHOD: Relevant studies were retrospectively searched. Seven English keywords identified from MESH were used while searching. The search was carried out in five international databases by trying various combinations of these words during February 15-25, 2021. This systematic review was updated by rescanning databases on December 20, 2021 and a total of 611 studies were attained. RESULTS: 17 studies which met the study inclusion criteria, which were conducted mostly through online survey method in different study designs and which included a total of 24,889 healthcare professionals were examined. The incidence of PPE-related pressure ulcers was found to be between 30% and 92.8%. Grade I pressure ulcers were the most common (44.1%-82%). The incidence of skin problems except PPE-related pressure ulcers such as itching, redness and dry skin was found to be between 42.8-88.1%. Risk factors that frequently played a role in the development of PPE-related pressure ulcers and other skin problems were longer use of PPE and sweating. PPE-related pressure ulcers and other skin problems were more frequent over the nose (nasal bone/nasal bridge), ears, forehead and cheeks. PPE-related itching, redness and dry skin mostly occurred. Several dressing applications were found to be effective in the prevention of PPE-related pressure ulcers and other skin problems that might develop especially on the facial region. CONCLUSION: PPE-related pressure ulcers and other skin problems were found to be higher among healthcare professionals. Data regarding the sealing of dressing applications against viral transmission in the prevention of PPE-related pressure ulcers and other skin problems are limited. It is estimated that future studies will be performed to prevent device-related pressure ulcers in healthcare workers. It is suggested that there is a need to conduct studies with larger samples where expert researchers make observations for pressure ulcers in order to determine the prevalence and incidence of PPE-related pressure ulcers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Pruritus , Retrospective Studies
14.
Cells ; 11(8)2022 04 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785540

ABSTRACT

The risk of complications following surgical procedures is significantly increased in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, the mechanisms underlying these correlations are not fully known. Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients who underwent reconstructive surgery for pressure ulcers (PUs) before and during the COVID-19 pandemic were included in this study. The patient's postoperative progression was registered, and the subcutaneous white adipose tissue (s-WAT) surrounding the ulcers was analyzed by proteomic and immunohistochemical assays to identify the molecular/cellular signatures of impaired recovery. Patients with SCI and a COVID-19-positive diagnosis showed worse recovery and severe postoperative complications, requiring reintervention. Several proteins were upregulated in the adipose tissue of these patients. Among them, CKMT2 and CKM stood out, and CKM increased for up to 60 days after the COVID-19 diagnosis. Moreover, CKMT2 and CKM were largely found in MGCs within the s-WAT of COVID patients. Some of these proteins presented post-translational modifications and were targeted by autoantibodies in the serum of COVID patients. Overall, our results indicate that CKMT2, CKM, and the presence of MGCs in the adipose tissue surrounding PUs in post-COVID patients could be predictive biomarkers of postsurgical complications. These results suggest that the inflammatory response in adipose tissue may underlie the defective repair seen after surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Spinal Cord Injuries , Adipose Tissue/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Testing , Creatine Kinase/metabolism , Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form/metabolism , Humans , Pandemics , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Pressure Ulcer/surgery , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Cord Injuries/complications , Spinal Cord Injuries/surgery , Suppuration/complications , Up-Regulation
16.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(4): 1061-1068, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735960

ABSTRACT

AIM: To evaluate the completion of nursing records through scheduled audits to analyse risk outcome indicators. BACKGROUND: Nursing records support clinical decision-making and encourage continuity of care, hence the importance of auditing their completion in order to take corrective action where necessary. METHOD: This was an observational descriptive study carried out from February to November 2020 with a sample of 1131 electronic health records belonging to patients admitted to COVID-19 hospital units during three observation periods: pre-pandemic, first wave, and second wave. RESULTS: A significant reduction in nursing record completion rates was observed between pre-pandemic period and first and second waves: Braden scale 40.97%, 28.02%, and 30.99%; Downton scale: 43.74%, 22.34%, and 33.91%; Gijón scale: 40.12%, 26.23%, and 33.64% (p < 0.001). There was an increase in the number of records completed between the first and second waves following the measures adopted after the quality audit. CONCLUSIONS: The use of scheduled audits of nursing records as quality indicators facilitated the detection of areas for improvement, allowing timely corrective actions. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Support from nursing managers at health care facilities to implement quality assessment programmes encompassing audits of clinical record completion will encourage the adoption of measures for corrective action.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Accidental Falls , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Nursing Records , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Social Vulnerability
17.
Br J Nurs ; 31(4): S22-S32, 2022 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1716169

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Many patients with COVID-19 admitted to intensive care undergo prone positioning. These patients are at risk of developing facial pressure ulcers (PUs). This study aimed to identify evidence-based recommendations to prevent or reduce their incidence. METHOD: A multi-case study was undertaken using secondary data published between November 2020 and April 2021 discussing facial PUs in patients with COVID-19. CINAHL and MEDLINE electronic databases were analysed. Sixteen publications met the inclusion criteria. The overall quality of evidence was low. RESULT: Studies reported a high incidence of facial PUs. The evidence suggests key preventive areas are skin assessment, pressure-redistribution surfaces, eye coverings, education, medical devices and prophylactic dressings. Recommendations included skin cleaning and moisturising, eye coverings, replacing endotracheal tube holders and using hydrocolloid or film dressings. CONCLUSION: Considering the severe implications for patients and healthcare systems caused by facial PUs, ICUs should develop strategies to prevent and minimise them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Ulcer
19.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 37(2): 162-167, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703352

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 negatively impacts many organ systems including the skin. One of the most significant skin-associated adverse events related to hospitalization are pressure injuries. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine 8 risk factors that would place hospitalized patients at a higher risk for hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A retrospective, descriptive analysis was conducted in an urban academic health science center located in the southeastern United States. RESULTS: There were 247 of 23 093 patients who had pressure injuries and 1053 patients who had a positive COVID-19 diagnosis. Based on the generalized estimating equation model, diagnosis of COVID-19, age, male gender, risk of mortality, severity of illness, and length of stay are statistically significant factors associated with the development of HAPIs. CONCLUSIONS: Further study should explore pathology of COVID-19 skin changes and what interventions are effective against HAPIs in the COVID-19 population taking into consideration current treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , COVID-19 Testing , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 102(10): 1932-1938, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439853

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine if the incidence of pressure injuries (PIs) on admission to an inpatient rehabilitation hospital (IRH) system of care was increased during the early coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic period. DESIGN: Retrospective survey chart review of consecutive cohorts. Admissions to 4 acute IRHs within 1 system of care over the first consecutive 6-week period of admitting patients positive for COVID-19 during the initial peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, April 1-May 9, 2020. A comparison was made with the pre-COVID-19 period, January 1-February 19, 2020. SETTING: Four acute IRHs with admissions on a referral basis from acute care hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: A consecutive sample (N=1125) of pre-COVID-19 admissions (n=768) and COVID-19 period admissions (n=357), including persons who were COVID-19-positive (n=161) and COVID-19-negative (n=196). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of PIs on admission to IRH. RESULTS: Prevalence of PIs on admission during the COVID-19 pandemic was increased when compared with the pre-COVID-19 period by 14.9% (P<.001). There was no difference in the prevalence of PIs in the COVID-19 period between patients who were COVID-19-positive and COVID-19-negative (35.4% vs 35.7%). The severity of PIs, measured by the wound stage of the most severe PI the patient presented with, worsened during the COVID-19 period compared with pre-COVID-19 (χ2 32.04%, P<.001). The length of stay in the acute care hospital before transfer to the IRH during COVID-19 was greater than pre-COVID-19 by 10.9% (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: During the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic time frame, there was an increase in the prevalence and severity of PIs noted on admission to our IRHs. This may represent the significant burden placed on the health care system by the pandemic, affecting all patients regardless of COVID-19 status. This information is important to help all facilities remain vigilant to prevent PIs as the pandemic continues and potential future pandemics that place strain on medical resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Admission , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Female , Hospitals, Rehabilitation , Humans , Incidence , Inpatients , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL