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3.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 50(3): 225-231, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401810

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The crisis situation generated by COVID-19 and the measures adopted have generated social changes in the normal dynamics of the general population and especially for health workers, who find themselves caring for patients with suspected or confirmed infection. Recent studies have detected in them depression and anxiety symptoms and burnout syndrome, with personal and social conditions impacting their response capacity during the health emergency. Our aim was to generate recommendations for the promotion and protection of the mental health of health workers and teams in the first line of care in the health emergency due to COVID-19. METHODS: A rapid literature search was carried out in PubMed and Google Scholar, and an iterative expert consensus and through electronic consultation, with 13 participants from the areas of psychology, psychiatry and medicine; the grading of its strength and directionality was carried out according to the international standards of the Joanna Briggs Institute. RESULTS: Thirty-one recommendations were generated on self-care of health workers, community care among health teams, screening for alarm signs in mental health and for health institutions. CONCLUSIONS: The promotion and protection activities in mental health to face the health emergency generated by COVID-19 worldwide can include coordinated actions between workers, health teams and health institutions as part of a comprehensive, community care, co-responsible and sustained over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/therapy , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Occupational Health Services/methods , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/standards , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Occupational Health Services/standards , Preventive Health Services/methods , Preventive Health Services/standards , Self Care/methods , Self Care/standards
7.
J Hosp Infect ; 109: 68-77, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1047671

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has presented an enormous challenge to healthcare providers worldwide. The appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE) has been essential to ensure staff and patient safety. The 'PPE Helper Programme' was developed at a large London hospital group to counteract suboptimal PPE practice. Based on a behaviour change model of capability, opportunity and motivation (COM-B), the programme provided PPE support, advice and education to ward staff. AIM: Evaluation of the PPE Helper Programme. METHODS: Clinical and non-clinical ward staff completed a questionnaire informed by the Theoretical Domains Framework and COM-B model. The questionnaire was available in paper and electronic versions. Quantitative responses were analysed using descriptive and non-parametric statistics, and free-text responses were analysed thematically. FINDINGS: Over a 6-week period, PPE helpers made 268 ward visits. Overall, 261 questionnaires were available for analysis. Across the Trust, 68% of respondents reported having had contact with a PPE helper. Staff who had encountered a PPE helper responded significantly more positively to a range of statements about using PPE than staff who had not encountered a PPE helper. Black and minority ethnic staff were significantly more anxious regarding the adequacy of PPE. Non-clinical and redeployed staff (e.g. domestic staff) were most positive about the impact of PPE helpers. Free-text comments showed that staff found the PPE Helper Programme supportive and would have liked it earlier in the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The PPE Helper Programme is a feasible and beneficial intervention for providing support, advice and education to ward staff during infectious disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/education , Hospitals/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Preventive Health Services/standards , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , London/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(23)2020 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963272

ABSTRACT

Sedentary behaviour (SB) in children is related to negative health consequences that can track into adulthood. The programme "Join the Healthy Boat" promotes reduced screen time and a less sedentary lifestyle in schoolchildren. This study investigated the effects of the programme on children's SB. For one year, teachers delivered the programme. A total of 231 children (7.0 ± 0.6 years) participated in the cluster-randomised study; there were 154 one year later at follow-up. Children's SB was assessed using multi-sensor accelerometery, screen time via parental questionnaire. Effects were analysed using (linear) mixed effects regression models. At baseline, children spent 211 (±89) min daily in SB, at follow-up 259 (±109) min/day with no significant difference between the intervention (IG) and control group (CG). SB was higher during weekends (p < 0.01, for CG and IG). However, at follow-up, daily screen time decreased in IG (screen time of >1 h/day: baseline: 33.3% vs. 27.4%; follow-up: 41.2% vs. 27.5%, for CG and IG, respectively). This multi-dimensional, low-threshold intervention for one year does not seem to achieve a significant reduction in children's SB, although screen time decreased in IG. Therefore, it should be considered that screen time cannot be the key contributor to SB and should not solely be used for changing children's SB. However, if screen time is targeted, interventions should promote the replacement of screen time with active alternatives.


Subject(s)
Health Promotion , Preventive Health Services , Schools , Sedentary Behavior , Child , Female , Germany , Health Promotion/methods , Humans , Male , Preventive Health Services/standards , Preventive Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Schools/statistics & numerical data
13.
J Natl Med Assoc ; 112(6): 681-687, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-950877

ABSTRACT

Influenza is a contagious respiratory virus that causes a significant annual health burden in the United States (US). In spite of effective yearly vaccinations to protect individuals against influenza-related health complications, especially with certain chronic co-morbid illnesses, persistent racial/ethnic disparities exist in influenza immunization. African Americans continue to experience low vaccination uptake, stemming, at least in part, from years of bias in and mistrust of orthodox medicine, safety concerns, and environmental barriers to vaccine access. The novel respiratory coronavirus, SARS-CoV2, causes COVID-19, leading to a pandemic that in the U.S. has exerted severe physical, psychological, and economic tolls on the African Americans and other disadvantaged communities. These two respiratory-borne virus' cause disparate effects in the black community, unmasking persistent disparities in healthcare. Unfortunately, suboptimal influenza immunization acceptance exacerbates flu-related adverse health outcomes, similar to difficulties from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. In consideration of the impending influenza-COVID-19 "twindemic", robust educational campaigns, policy initiatives, and novel approaches to influenza immunization must be considered for the African American community to build trust in the health benefits of the influenza vaccination and, ultimately, to trust in the health benefits of potential SARS-CoV2 vaccines, when available for the general public.


Subject(s)
African Americans , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human , Preventive Health Services , Quality Improvement/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ethnology , Preventive Health Services/methods , Preventive Health Services/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
16.
Sensors (Basel) ; 20(17)2020 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742835

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has shown a relatively low case fatality rate in young healthy individuals, with the majority of this group being asymptomatic or having mild symptoms. However, the severity of the disease among the elderly as well as in individuals with underlying health conditions has caused significant mortality rates worldwide. Understanding this variance amongst different sectors of society and modelling this will enable the different levels of risk to be determined to enable strategies to be applied to different groups. Long-established compartmental epidemiological models like SIR and SEIR do not account for the variability encountered in the severity of the SARS-CoV-2 disease across different population groups. The objective of this study is to investigate how a reduction in the exposure of vulnerable individuals to COVID-19 can minimise the number of deaths caused by the disease, using the UK as a case study. To overcome the limitation of long-established compartmental epidemiological models, it is proposed that a modified model, namely SEIR-v, through which the population is separated into two groups regarding their vulnerability to SARS-CoV-2 is applied. This enables the analysis of the spread of the epidemic when different contention measures are applied to different groups in society regarding their vulnerability to the disease. A Monte Carlo simulation (100,000 runs) along the proposed SEIR-v model is used to study the number of deaths which could be avoided as a function of the decrease in the exposure of vulnerable individuals to the disease. The results indicate a large number of deaths could be avoided by a slight realistic decrease in the exposure of vulnerable groups to the disease. The mean values across the simulations indicate 3681 and 7460 lives could be saved when such exposure is reduced by 10% and 20% respectively. From the encouraging results of the modelling a number of mechanisms are proposed to limit the exposure of vulnerable individuals to the disease. One option could be the provision of a wristband to vulnerable people and those without a smartphone and contact-tracing app, filling the gap created by systems relying on smartphone apps only. By combining very dense contact tracing data from smartphone apps and wristband signals with information about infection status and symptoms, vulnerable people can be protected and kept safer.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Transmission, Infectious/statistics & numerical data , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Public Health/methods , Quarantine/organization & administration , Vulnerable Populations , COVID-19 , Contact Tracing/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Health Planning Guidelines , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Inventions/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Preventive Health Services/methods , Preventive Health Services/organization & administration , Preventive Health Services/standards , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Public Health Administration/methods , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data
18.
High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev ; 27(5): 373-377, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689121

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the Sars-Cov-2 pandemic is causing a huge and dramatic impact on healthcare systems worldwide. During this emergency, fragile patients suffering from other comorbidities, especially patients susceptible to or affected by cardiovascular disease, are the ones most exposed to the poorer outcomes. Therefore, it is still mandatory to continue to strictly adhere to the rules of cardiovascular prevention. This document aims to provide all doctors with simple and clear recommendations in order to spread useful messages to the widest number of subjects in order to continue the battle against cardiovascular diseases even in times of pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Cardiology/standards , Cardiovascular Agents/therapeutic use , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Preventive Health Services/standards , Risk Reduction Behavior , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Agents/adverse effects , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Vasc Nurs ; 38(4): 176-179, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688967

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease of 2019 poses significant risks for patients with vascular disease. Telemedicine can help clinicians provide care for patients with vascular disease while adhering to social-distancing guidelines. In this article, we review the components of telemedicine used in the vascular medicine practice at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. In addition, we describe inpatient and outpatient diagnosis-based algorithms to help select patients for telemedicine versus in-person evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiology/standards , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Preventive Health Services/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Cardiology/methods , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Humans , Preventive Health Services/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Tennessee
20.
Curr Res Transl Med ; 68(3): 111-118, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-622221

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is spreading rapidly across the world. Currently, the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the continuity of essential routine healthcare services and procedures, including chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy, a life-saving option for patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) hematologic malignancies. Due to the rapid disease progression of hematological malignancies, there is an urgent need to manufacture and utilize CAR T-cells. However, CAR-T treatment has become extraordinarily challenging during this COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, many medical and technical factors must now be taken into consideration before, during, and after CAR-T therapy. The purpose of this review is to provide brief suggestions for rational decision-making strategies in evaluating and selecting CAR T-cell treatment and appropriate CAR T-cell products, and protective strategies for medical staff and patients to prevent infection in the midst of the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Immunotherapy, Adoptive , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Immunotherapy, Adoptive/methods , Immunotherapy, Adoptive/trends , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Preventive Health Services/methods , Preventive Health Services/organization & administration , Preventive Health Services/standards , Preventive Health Services/trends , SARS-CoV-2
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