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1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265061, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1896451

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Even though people of the world were eagerly waiting for the hope of vaccine development, vaccine hesitancy is becoming the top concern in both developed and developing countries. However, there is no adequate evidence regarding the attitude and perception of health professionals towards the COVID 19 vaccine in resource-limited settings like Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to assess health professionals' attitudes and perceptions towards COVID 19 vaccine in Western Ethiopia. METHODS: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted among health care workers found in Nekemte town from April 14-21, 2021. A total of 439 health professionals present on duty during the study period was included in the study. The data were collected by using self-administered questionnaire. Epidata version 3.2 was used for data entry, and STATA version 14 was used for data analysis. The binary logistic regression model was employed to determine factors associated with the attitude towards COVID-19 vaccination. Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence intervals was computed and statistical significance was declared at a 5% level (p-value < 0.05). RESULT: A total of 431 health professionals participated in the study yielding a response rate of 98.1%. The results indicated that 51.28% (95%CI: 45.12%, 57.34%) of health professionals had a favorable attitude towards COVID-19 vaccination. Having good knowledge about the COVID-19 vaccine (AOR = 0.38, 95%CI: 0.22, 0.64, P-value <0.001) was negatively associated with unfavorable attitude towards COVID-19 vaccine, whereas age less than 30 years (AOR = 2.14, 95%CI:1.25,3.67, P-value <0.001), working in a private clinic (AOR = 7.77, 95% CI: 2.19, 27.58, P-value <0.001) and health center (AOR = 2.45, 95%CI: 1.01, 5.92, P-value = 0.045) were positively associated with unfavorable attitude towards COVID-19 vaccine. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION: In general, the attitude and perception of health care professionals toward the COVID-19 vaccine in the study area were unsatisfactory. Knowledge about the COVID-19 vaccine, age of health care workers, and place of work are the factors which affects attitude towards COVID-19 vaccine. Thus, we recommend the media outlets and concerned bodies to work to develop trust among the public by disseminating accurate and consistent information about the vaccine.


Subject(s)
Attitude , Health Personnel/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Community Health Centers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia , Female , Humans , Knowledge , Male , Multivariate Analysis , Private Facilities , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology
2.
J Nutr ; 152(5): 1316-1326, 2022 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1886458

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although most health facilities in urban Nigeria are privately owned, interventions to promote optimal breastfeeding practices in private facilities have not previously been implemented. OBJECTIVES: We tested the impact of a breastfeeding promotion intervention on early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding among clients of private facilities in Lagos, Nigeria. METHODS: The intervention included training for health-care providers on the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and breastfeeding counseling skills, provision of interpersonal communication and support to women at facilities and on WhatsApp, distribution of behavior change communication materials, and mobile phone and mass media messaging. We used logistic regression models adjusted for clustering to measure intervention impact in a cohort of women (n = 1200) at 10 intervention and 10 comparison facilities interviewed during their third trimester and at 6 and 24 weeks postpartum. RESULTS: The intervention significantly increased the percentage of infants who were exclusively breastfed at 6 weeks (83% intervention; 76% comparison; P = 0.02) and 24 weeks (66% intervention; 52% comparison; P < 0.001), but had no impact on early initiation of breastfeeding (35% intervention; 33% comparison; P = 0.65). Among infants who were exclusively breastfed at 6 weeks, the odds of continued exclusive breastfeeding at 24 weeks were higher in the intervention arm than in the comparison arm (OR, 1.6; 95% CI: 1.2-2.1). Infants had increased odds of being exclusively breastfed at 6 weeks if their mothers discussed breastfeeding with a private health provider (OR, 2.3; 95% CI: 1.5-3.4), received text or WhatsApp messages about breastfeeding (OR, 1.7; 95% CI: 1.0-2.7), or heard breastfeeding radio spots (OR, 4.2; 95% CI: 1.2-14.7). Infants had increased odds of exclusive breastfeeding at 24 weeks if their mothers participated in a WhatsApp breastfeeding support group (OR, 1.5; 95% CI: 1.0-2.2). CONCLUSIONS: A breastfeeding intervention in private health facilities in Lagos increased exclusive breastfeeding. Implementation of breastfeeding interventions in private facilities could extend the reach of breastfeeding promotion programs in urban Nigeria. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT04835051.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , Cell Phone , Breast Feeding/psychology , Communication , Female , Health Facilities , Humans , Infant , Mass Media , Nigeria , Private Facilities
3.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 119(5): 310-316, oct. 2021. tab, ilus
Article in English, Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1488844

ABSTRACT

Introducción. A fin de 2019 se identificó una nueva variedad de coronavirus causante de COVID-19 que alcanzó categoría de pandemia. En Argentina, el área metropolitana de Buenos Aires (AMBA) concentra alrededor del 37 % de la población total y el mayor número de casos diagnosticados. El objetivo de este estudio fue describir las características clínico-epidemiológicas de los pacientes con COVID-19 y describir el impacto en el funcionamiento del Servicio de Pediatría de una institución privada de la zona. Métodos. Diseño retrospectivo, observacional, desarrollado en una institución de la zona oeste del AMBA entre el 12 de marzo y el 31 de agosto de 2020. Se incluyeron todos los menores de 16 años con diagnóstico de COVID-19. Se registraron características demográficas, epidemiológicas, clínicas, indicación de internación/control ambulatorio, número de consultas externas, internación por infecciones virales estacionales, licenciamiento del personal, modificación del número de camas y de las actividades de los profesionales. Resultados. Hubo 5454 consultas ambulatorias pediátricas totales, sospecha de COVID-19 en 753/5 454 (13,8 %), se confirmaron 152/753 (20,2 %). Mediana de edad 82 meses (rango intercuartílico: 20,5-147 m), el 50 % fueron varones. La fiebre fue el síntoma más frecuente. Se internaron 22/152 (14,5 %). Las consultas disminuyeron el 87 %, no hubo internación por infecciones virales estacionales y el 52,9 % (91/172) del personal fue licenciado. Conclusiones. La mayoría de los casos fueron leves y la fiebre fue el principal síntoma. Observamos un notable impacto en el funcionamiento del servicio en cuanto al recurso humano. Destacamos la necesidad de la organización logística del servicio para enfrentar esta contingencia.


Introduction. Towards the end of 2019, a novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 was identified and became a pandemic. In Argentina, approximately 37 % of the total population lives in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires (AMBA), where most cases have been diagnosed. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of COVID-19 patients and the impact on the operations of the Department of Pediatrics of a private facility located in the AMBA. Methods. Retrospective, observational study conducted at a facility in the west of AMBA between March 12th and August 31st, 2020. All patients younger than 16 years diagnosed with COVID-19 were included. Demographic, epidemiological, and clinical characteristics; indication for hospitalization/outpatient follow-up; number of outpatient visits; hospitalization due to seasonal viral infections; staff on leave; changes in bed availability and health care providers' activities were recorded. Results. There were 5454 pediatric outpatient visits, COVID-19 was suspected in 753/5454 (13.8 %) and 152/753 (20.2 %) were confirmed cases. Their median age was 82 months (interquartile range: 20.5-147 months); 50 % were males. Fever was the most common symptom. In total, 22/152 (14.5 %) patients were hospitalized. Outpatients visits decreased by 87 %; there were no hospitalizations due to seasonal viral infections; and 52.9 % (91/172) of staff took a leave. Conclusions. Most cases were mild, and fever was the main symptom. The department operations were considerably affected in terms of human resources. It is worth noting the need for a logistic organization at the Department of Pediatrics to face such contingency.


Subject(s)
Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Pediatrics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , Private Facilities , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(5): 310-316, 2021 10.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441335

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Health care workers experience a tremendous strain while performing their activities, very frequently leading to stress, burnout syndrome, and psychopathological impact. The COVID-19 pandemic may cause physicians to suffer these effects even to a greater extent. Our objective was to describe the frequency of stress, burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression during the pandemic, and analyze the associations with different independent outcome measures. METHODS: Observational, cross-sectional study conducted 2 months after the lockdown was established in Argentina. Clinical specialists, surgeons, emergency physicians, and those with no direct contact with patients were surveyed using a sociodemographic questionnaire and 3 self-administered inventories: Health Professions Stress Inventory, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. RESULTS: The prevalence of stress was 93.7 % (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 90.33-96.2), burnout syndrome 73.5 % (95 % CI: 68.2-78.4), anxiety 44 % (95 % CI: 38.4-49.8), and depression 21.9 % (95 % CI: 17.3-26.9). No association was observed between the frequency and medical specialty. The frequency of burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression was significantly higher among residents and physicians working in the emergency department. ConcluSions: Residents and emergency physicians working 24-hour shifts showed significantly higher percentages of burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression compared to staff and head physicians. These findings may be associated with a higher workload and less experience. It is compulsory to take preventive and therapeutic measures to protect those in the pandemic front line.


Introducción. A fin de 2019 se identificó una nueva variedad de coronavirus causante de COVID-19 que alcanzó categoría de pandemia. En Argentina, el área metropolitana de Buenos Aires (AMBA) concentra alrededor del 37 % de la población total y el mayor número de casos diagnosticados. El objetivo de este estudio fue describir las características clínicoepidemiológicas de los pacientes con COVID-19 y describir el impacto en el funcionamiento del Servicio de Pediatría de una institución privada de la zona. Métodos. Diseño retrospectivo, observacional, desarrollado en una institución de la zona oeste del AMBA entre el 12 de marzo y el 31 de agosto de 2020. Se incluyeron todos los menores de 16 años con diagnóstico de COVID-19. Se registraron características demográficas, epidemiológicas, clínicas, indicación de internación/control ambulatorio, número de consultas externas, internación por infecciones virales estacionales, licenciamiento del personal, modificación del número de camas y de las actividades de los profesionales. Resultados. Hubo 5454 consultas ambulatorias pediátricas totales, sospecha de COVID-19 en 753/5 454 (13,8 %), se confirmaron 152/753 (20,2 %). Mediana de edad 82 meses (rango intercuartílico: 20,5-147 m), el 50 % fueron varones. La fiebre fue el síntoma más frecuente. Se internaron 22/152 (14,5 %). Las consultas disminuyeron el 87 %, no hubo internación por infecciones virales estacionales y el 52,9 % (91/172) del personal fue licenciado. Conclusiones. La mayoría de los casos fueron leves y la fiebre fue el principal síntoma. Observamos un notable impacto en el funcionamiento del servicio en cuanto al recurso humano. Destacamos la necesidad de la organización logística del servicio para enfrentar esta contingencia.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Pediatrics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Private Facilities , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Rev Esp Geriatr Gerontol ; 56(4): 208-217, 2021.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203259

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To find out whether elements such as public expenditure, the coverage ratio, public or private ownership, and the size of Nursing homes relate to the number of deaths in residences per COVID-19. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 15 variables are analyzed in 17 Autonomous Communities (n = 17), where the following stand out: public expenditure per dependent person; incidence of COVID-19 in each Autonomous Community; deaths in Nursing homes by COVID-19; and analysis of places in Nursing homes. Reliability of r = 0.613. Regression analyses are carried out with the different variables, and ANOVA tests. RESULTS: Percentages of deaths by COVID-19 in Nursing homes, between 40% and 88%, of the total of (p < 0.001, X2 = 0.975). A relationship is established between the number of deaths from COVID-19 in Nursing homes, and the higher number of private Nursing homes (p < 0.001, X2 = 0.633). The larger the size of the Nursing home, the more deaths by COVID-19 were recorded (p < 0.001, X2 = 0.787), with private Nursing homes having +100 places, and public Nursing homes having +100 places (p < 0.001, X2 = 0.808). CONCLUSIONS: It was found that there is a relationship between the number of deaths from COVID-19 in Nursing homes, and the fact that there are a greater number of private Nursing homes in that autonomous community. It was detected that the model of Nursing home best prepared to face the COVID-19: public Nursing homes with less than 25 places.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Homes for the Aged , Nursing Homes , Aged , Health Expenditures , Humans , Incidence , Ownership , Private Facilities , Public Facilities , Spain
6.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 93, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100422

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic presents an opportunity for the Nigerian health system to harness the potentials available in the private sector to augment the capacity within the public health system. This survey was carried out to assess private facility readiness in providing screening services in Edo State. METHODS: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out among private facilities in Edo state. Facilities were selected using stratified sampling technique. Data was collected using adapted questionnaires and an observational checklist. Facility readiness was assessed using the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control recommendations for screening. Parameters were scored and overall scores were converted to proportions. Facilities that scored 70% and above were adjudged to be ready while facilities that scored 69% and below were adjudged to be not ready. RESULTS: A total of 252 health facilities were assessed, comprising 149 (59.1%) hospitals/clinics, 62 (24.6%) pharmacies and 41 (16.3%) laboratories. One hundred and forty-two (95.3%), 60 (96.8%) and 41 (100.0%) hospitals/clinics, pharmacies and laboratories, respectively had hand hygiene facilities. However, overall facility readiness assessment scores for screening services were low with only 51 (34.2%) hospitals/clinics, 2 (3.2%) pharmacies and 2 (4.9%) laboratories achieving high enough scores to be adjudged ready for screening services. CONCLUSION: Overall facility readiness of the private health sector to provide screening services in Edo State was assessed to be low. The government and facility owners will need to ensure that screening services are improved in all facilities to help mitigate community spread of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Mass Screening/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Facilities , Humans , Nigeria , Pandemics , Private Facilities/organization & administration , Private Sector , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
J Cancer Policy ; 27: 100269, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988298

ABSTRACT

The advent of the COVID-19 pandemic has stretched most healthcare systems to the point that if no adaptations are made, failure will most likely happen. The Philippine healthcare system, with its meager resources, is very much vulnerable to this. During the start of the pandemic, Bataan General Hospital and Medical Center has been converted to a COVID-19 hub, leaving cancer care and treatment displaced. We describe our experience in the feasibility of using a religious facility as an interim place for continuing oncology treatment. An outpatient chemotherapy unit was set up using the main hall of the Residencia Sacerdotal, a religious facility, in Bataan. General practices for infection control, workflow and service delivery were in accordance with existing guidelines. A total of 56 adult patients and 22 pediatric patients were seen for chemotherapy during the period of April 28 to July 15, 2020. A total of 144 chemotherapy sessions for adults and 190 sessions for pediatric patients were done. Fifty nine patients (43 adults and 16 pediatric) were tested for COVID-19 RT PCR (GeneXpert®), as baseline prior to chemotherapy, and all were negative. During the course of treatment, adverse events were noted including infusion reactions, hematologic complications which resolved without any complications. No nosocomial infection was recorded both for patients and healthcare workers. To conclude, in the COVID-19 Pandemic Era adapting to the situation is the best way forward. In our setting, continuing cancer care in a religious facility is a feasible alternative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Neoplasms/therapy , Private Facilities/organization & administration , Religion , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Philippines/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Pan Afr Med J ; 37(Suppl 1): 18, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-994232

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: the increased demands of health facilities and workers due to coronavirus overwhelm the already burdened Tanzanian health systems. This study evaluates the current capacity of facilities and providers for HIV care and treatment services and their preparedness to adhere to the national and global precaution guidelines for HIV service providers and patients. METHODS: data for this study come from the latest available, Tanzania Service Provision Assessment survey 2014-15. Frequencies and percentages described the readiness and availability of HIV services and providers. Chi-square test compared the distribution of services by facility location and availability and readiness of precaution commodities and HIV services by managing authorities. RESULTS: availability of latex gloves was high (83% at OPD and 95.3% laboratory). Availability of medical masks, alcohol-based hand rub and disinfectants was low. Availability of medical mask at outpatient department (OPD) was 28.7% urban (23.5% public; 33.8% private, p=0.02) and 13.5% rural (10.1% public; 25.4% private, p=0.001) and lower at laboratories. Fewer facilities in rural area (68.4%) had running water in OPD than urban (86.3%). Higher proportions of providers at public than private facilities in urban (82.8% versus 73.1%) and rural (88.2% versus 81.6%) areas provided HIV test counseling and at least two other HIV services. CONCLUSION: availability of commodities such as medical masks, alcohol-based hand rub, and disinfectant was low while the readiness of providers to multitask HIV related services was high. Urgent distribution and re-assessment of these supplies are necessary, to protect HIV patients, their caregivers, and health providers from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , HIV Infections/therapy , Health Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Disinfectants/supply & distribution , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Hand Sanitizers/supply & distribution , Health Care Surveys , Health Facilities/standards , Humans , Masks/supply & distribution , Private Facilities/standards , Private Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Public Facilities/standards , Public Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Rural Health Services/standards , Rural Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Tanzania , Urban Health Services/standards , Urban Health Services/statistics & numerical data
9.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 146, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-946296

ABSTRACT

Prevention of exposure to the COVID-19 virus in the general population is an essential strategy to slow community transmission. This paper shares the experiences and challenges of community engagement in COVID-19 prevention in the Kilimanjaro region, Northern Tanzania implemented by our team from the Institute of Public Health (IPH), Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College (KCMUCo) in collaboration with the COVID-19 response team in the Moshi Municipality. We conducted an education session with the COVID-19 response team and together brainstormed transmission hotspots and which interventions would be most feasible in their settings. The first hotspot identified was crowded local market spaces. Suggested interventions included targeted and mass public health education through the engagement of market opinion leaders, public announcements, and radio shows. We conducted participatory rural appraisal techniques to enable market vendors and clients to visualize two-meter distances and provided a prototype hand-washing facility that was foot operated. We found mass public health educational campaigns essential to inform and update the public about COVID-19 pandemic and to address rumors and misinformation, which hampers compliance with public health interventions. Coordinated efforts among stakeholders in the country are necessary to develop context-specific prevention and case management strategies following the national and international guidelines. Local ownership of recommended interventions is necessary to ensure compliance.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Community Participation , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Hand Disinfection/instrumentation , Health Education/methods , Health Education/organization & administration , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Leadership , Mass Media , Mobile Applications , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Private Facilities , Public Health , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2 , Stakeholder Participation , Tanzania/epidemiology
10.
Toxicol Ind Health ; 36(9): 718-727, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-836809

ABSTRACT

The reopening of arenas and stadiums following closures due to the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic presents unique challenges related to large crowds and close contact between players, vendors, and spectators. While each venue should be assessed individually for development and implementation of reopening plans, the general guidance presented in this document can serve as a minimum baseline for considerations to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission in these venues. The intention of these guidelines is to provide a layered approach to risk mitigation for various aspects of particular concern in arenas and stadiums, including crowd management, tailgating and parking, restrooms, high-contact surfaces, face masks, food and merchandising, communications, athletes and support staff, press and third parties, intermissions/breaks, and downtime. The implementation of these multifaceted approaches in each area of concern, along with the integration of regulations and requirements from local, state, and federal government bodies and agencies, will reduce the risk of a single point of failure and offer some protection to those at arenas and stadiums from COVID-19 transmission. The approaches outlined are dynamic and should be regularly reviewed and revised as new information becomes available regarding the transmission of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Guidelines as Topic , Return to Work , Safety Management/methods , Crowding , Humans , Pandemics , Private Facilities , Public Facilities , Sports
11.
Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 54(4): 342-344, 2020 Apr 06.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-47430

ABSTRACT

This guideline stipulates the management requirements, personal protection and comprehensive security of conference designated hotels. It is applicable to the unified standard prevention and control of conference designated hotels during COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Private Facilities , Public Health/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Congresses as Topic , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 54(4): 351-353, 2020 Apr 06.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-47428

ABSTRACT

This guideline stipulates the health protection requirements for hotels reconstructed as isolation places for close contacts during COVID-19 outbreak, including requirements for hotels, personal health protection, and management. It is applicable to hotels reconstructed as isolation places for close contacts, such as general hotels, conference center, sanitariums, etc.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Private Facilities , Public Health/methods , Quarantine , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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