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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 773704, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775978

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Quality-assured antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) depends upon the knowledge and skills of laboratory staff. In many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), including Pakistan, such types of knowledge and skills are limited. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use openaccess online courses to improve the knowledge of laboratory staff involved in the detection and reporting of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Methodology: Seven online modules comprising 22 courses aimed at strengthening the laboratory detection of Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) were developed. The courses were uploaded onto the website www.parn.org.pk. Participants had an option of selecting courses of their interest. Online registration and completion of a pre-course assessment (pre-test) were essential for enrolment. However, participation in post-course assessment (post-test) was optional. The number of registered participants and the proportion of participants who completed each course were computed. A paired t-test was used to assess the increase between mean pre- and post-test scores. The association between the participants working in public vs. private laboratories and course completion rates were determined using the chi-square test. Results: A total of 227 participants from Pakistan (March 2018 to June 2020) were registered. The largest number of registered participants and the highest completion rate were noted for AST and biosafety courses, while quality-related courses attracted a lower interest. A comparison of pre- and post-test performance using the paired mean score for the individual courses showed a statistically significant (the value of p < 0.05) improvement in 13/20 assessed courses. A higher course completion rate was observed in participants from public vs. private sector laboratories (56.8 vs. 30.8%, the value of p = 0.005). Conclusions: Our study suggests a promising potential for open online courses (OOCs) toward addressing knowledge gaps in laboratory practice in resource limited settings.


Subject(s)
Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Education, Distance , Professional Competence , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Humans , Internet , Laboratories , Pakistan
2.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 69(2): 89-96, 2022 Apr.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1761100

ABSTRACT

Societal ageing, the rising prevalence of chronic diseases, and the COVID-19 pandemic have changed the global healthcare environment dramatically. These challenges have significantly burdened community medical and healthcare systems and complicated the work of public health nursing. As an important care provider on the frontlines of primary care, public health nurses (PHNs) must keep up with the current state of the medical environment and statistical data interpretation, scientific data translation, community resource sharing, and telehealth applications. These demands have greatly impacted the traditional routines and existing professional core competencies of PHNs. Discussions among 12 Taiwanese public healthcare experts and the definition of public health nursing capacity from World Health Organization were considered in this review. In addition to reflecting on social changes and the professional development of public health nursing, eight prospective recommendations were provided in this review to enhance the professional competence of PHNs and better prepare them for future changes in the health environment and primary healthcare. The suggestions provide a reference for updating the position statement of PHNs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses, Public Health , Humans , Pandemics , Professional Competence , Prospective Studies , Taiwan
5.
Sch Psychol ; 37(1): 1-3, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665686

ABSTRACT

School Psychology is an outlet for research on children, youth, educators, and families that has scientific, practice, and policy implications for education and educational systems. In this editorial changes and growth in the journal over the past year pertaining to current and future journal impact, special topics, and editorial leadership are described. Advancements for School Psychology in terms of equity, diversity, and inclusion in the editorial process is reflected upon. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Psychology, Clinical , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Professional Competence , Psychology, Clinical/education , Psychology, Educational , Schools , Societies, Scientific
6.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 573-578, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504564

ABSTRACT

The ability to respond effectively and efficiently during times of crisis, including a pandemic, has emerged as a competency for nurse leaders. This article describes one institution's experience using the American Organization of Nurse Leaders Competencies for Nurse Executives in operationalizing the concept of surge capacity.


Subject(s)
Communication , Health Plan Implementation , Nurse Administrators/organization & administration , Professional Competence , Surge Capacity/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Chicago , Humans , United States
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 558, 2021 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501999

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The nature of a new health professional's transition from student to health professional is a significant determinant of the ease or difficulty of the journey to professional competence. The integrative review will explore the extent of literature on the factors that impact the transition of new health professionals into practice, identify possible gaps and synthesise findings which will inform further research. The aim was to identify research conducted in the last two decades on the barriers, facilitators and coping strategies employed by new health professionals during their transition into practice. METHODS: Whittemore and Knafl's methodological framework for conducting integrative reviews was used to guide this review. Sources between 1999 and 2019 were gathered using EBSCOhost (including CINAHL, Medline, Academic Search Premier, Health Science: Nursing and Academic Edition), PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane and Web of Science, as well as hand searching and follow-up of bibliographies followed. The Covidence platform was used to manage the project. All studies were screened against a predetermined selection criteria. Relevant data was extracted from included sources and analysed using thematic analysis approach. RESULTS: Of the 562 studies identified, relevant data was extracted from 24 studies that met the inclusion criteria, and analysed to form this review. Thematic analysis approach was used to categorise the findings into theme areas. Four overarching themes emerged namely: systems and structures, personal capacities, professional competence and mediating processes. Each theme revealed the barriers, facilitators and coping strategies of transition into practice among new health graduates. CONCLUSION: The transition into practice for new health practitioners has been described as complex and a period of great stress. Increasing clinical and practical experiences during education are required to support new health professionals in the process of closing the gap between learning and practice. Continued professional development activities should be readily available and attendance of these encouraged.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel , Students , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Learning , Professional Competence
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(40): e27423, 2021 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462562

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted almost all sectors of academic training and research, but the impact on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) research mentoring has yet to be documented. We present the perspectives of diverse, experienced mentors in a range of HIV research disciplines on the impact of COVID-19 on mentoring the next generation of HIV researchers.In November to December, 2020, we used an online data collection platform to cross-sectionally query previously-trained HIV mentors on the challenges related to mentoring during the pandemic, surprising/positive aspects of mentoring in that context, and recommendations for other mentors. Data were coded and analyzed following a thematic analysis approach.Respondents (180 of 225 mentors invited [80% response]) reported challenges related to relationship building/maintenance, disruptions in mentees' training and research progress, and mentee and mentor distress, with particular concerns regarding mentees who are parents or from underrepresented minority backgrounds. Positive/surprising aspects included logistical ease of remote mentoring, the relationship-edifying result of the shared pandemic experience, mentee resilience and gratitude, and increased enjoyment of mentoring. Recommendations included practical tips, encouragement for patience and persistence, and prioritizing supporting mentees' and one's own mental well-being.Findings revealed gaps in HIV mentors' competencies, including the effective use of remote mentoring tools, how to work with mentees in times of distress, and the prioritization of mentor well-being. Mentors are in a unique position to identify and potentially address factors that may lead to mentees leaving their fields, especially parents and those from underrepresented backgrounds. We discuss implications beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Mentoring/organization & administration , Research Personnel/education , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Distance , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Professional Competence , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
9.
Healthc Manage Forum ; 34(6): 340-345, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450683

ABSTRACT

In 2013, the Community Health Nurses of Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors and the Manitoba Public Health Managers Network received funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada to develop a set of interdisciplinary leadership competencies for seven public health disciplines. The Leadership Competencies for Public Health Practice in Canada project comprised a multimethod research approach that included a scoping literature review, on-line survey, webinar-based focus groups, and a modified Delphi process. The 49 leadership competencies for public health practice were organized according to the LEADS Canada capabilities. The leadership competencies extend the core public health competencies and discipline-specific competencies and reflect foundational values of public health. The leadership competencies can be applied to professional development pathways, mentoring programs, and performance appraisals to advance public health practice. How these competencies have been enacted by public health leaders during the COVID-19 pandemic is discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Canada , Humans , Pandemics , Professional Competence , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
10.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257872, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443846

ABSTRACT

The current challenges at the forefront of data-enabled science and engineering require interdisciplinary solutions. Yet most traditional doctoral programs are not structured to support successful interdisciplinary research. Here we describe the design of and students' experiences in the COMBINE (Computation and Mathematics for Biological Networks) interdisciplinary graduate program at the University of Maryland. COMBINE focuses on the development and application of network science methods to biological systems for students from three primary domains: life sciences, computational/engineering sciences, and mathematical/physical sciences. The program integrates three established models (T-shaped, pi-shaped and shield-shaped) for interdisciplinary training. The program components largely fall into three categories: (1) core coursework that provides content expertise, communication, and technical skills, (2) discipline-bridging elective courses in the two COMBINE domains that complement the student's home domain, (3) broadening activities such as workshops, symposiums, and formal peer-mentoring groups. Beyond these components, the program builds community through both formal and informal networking and social events. In addition to the interactions with other program participants, students engage with faculty in several ways beyond the conventional adviser framework, such as the requirement to select a second out-of-field advisor, listening to guest speakers, and networking with faculty through workshops. We collected data through post-program surveys, interviews and focus groups with students, alumni and faculty advisors. Overall, COMBINE students and alumni reported feeling that the program components supported their growth in the three program objectives of Network Science & Interdisciplinarity, Communication, and Career Preparation, but also recommended ways to improve the program. The value of the program can be seen not only through the student reports, but also through the students' research products in network science which include multiple publications and presentations. We believe that COMBINE offers an effective model for integrated interdisciplinary training that can be readily applied in other fields.


Subject(s)
Education, Graduate/methods , Interdisciplinary Studies , Humans , Mathematics , Models, Educational , Neural Networks, Computer , Professional Competence
11.
Andes Pediatr ; 92(4): 503-510, 2021 Aug.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404368

ABSTRACT

Professionalism is a well-defined competence in the education of residents. However, it is a complex construct, sensitive to social and cultural variables. It can be defined as the necessary skill, good jud gment and appropriate behavior expected of people trained to do their jobs well. It is a competence that does not remain stable over time and declines when the professional is subjected to high levels of stress, associated with quality of care, education, ethics, moral, philosophy and humanism. It is an essential competence for the professional and therefore we must rethink the curricula to include ways to teach and evaluate professionalism. It is essential to design programs that balance the workload with the well-being of future professionals. We must generate an adequate learning environment where the trainee is an active protagonist, and self-care is made visible as an essential competence to maintain the balance between personal and professional life. This article presents a review and reflects on this topic which is becoming increasingly important in the postgraduate training of future specialists.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Internship and Residency , Professionalism , Humans , Professional Competence , Self Care , Work-Life Balance
13.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0254722, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341498

ABSTRACT

Job security can never be taken for granted, especially in times of rapid, widespread and unexpected social and economic change. These changes can force workers to transition to new jobs. This may be because new technologies emerge or production is moved abroad. Perhaps it is a global crisis, such as COVID-19, which shutters industries and displaces labor en masse. Regardless of the impetus, people are faced with the challenge of moving between jobs to find new work. Successful transitions typically occur when workers leverage their existing skills in the new occupation. Here, we propose a novel method to measure the similarity between occupations using their underlying skills. We then build a recommender system for identifying optimal transition pathways between occupations using job advertisements (ads) data and a longitudinal household survey. Our results show that not only can we accurately predict occupational transitions (Accuracy = 76%), but we account for the asymmetric difficulties of moving between jobs (it is easier to move in one direction than the other). We also build an early warning indicator for new technology adoption (showcasing Artificial Intelligence), a major driver of rising job transitions. By using real-time data, our systems can respond to labor demand shifts as they occur (such as those caused by COVID-19). They can be leveraged by policy-makers, educators, and job seekers who are forced to confront the often distressing challenges of finding new jobs.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Employment , Professional Competence , Vocational Guidance/methods , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Datasets as Topic , Demography , Humans , Industry/methods , Industry/organization & administration , Industry/statistics & numerical data , Occupations/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Population Dynamics , Professional Competence/statistics & numerical data , Vocational Guidance/organization & administration , Vocational Guidance/statistics & numerical data
14.
Inform Health Soc Care ; 46(3): 229-233, 2021 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320282

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic requires an urgent action to transform health-care delivery and to promote research and capacity-building nursing programs. Specifically, many countries at the global level have described nursing informatics as an essential competence for nurse professionals. In Peru, nursing personnel represents the largest health workforce group and nursing informatics is still emerging, but the field appear to hold much promise. In this sense, the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MoH) defined in 2020 the core nursing competences, which included a technology and innovation domain. The competence established to apply scientifically based technology and innovation to improve the processes or health service resources. The minimum competencies established by the MoH were as follows: to carry out innovations in processes or resources in their different professional performance areas, to creatively adapt technology in different areas of professional performance, to make rational and ethical use of health technologies with focus on new developments that will be evaluated and applied critically, and to manage information and communication technologies, and health information systems, with emphasis on telehealth (i.e. telemedicine, telecare management, tele-education, and tele-training). Besides the nursing competences defined by the MoH is a good starting point, this special contribution discusses the urgent need to strengthen nursing informatics competencies in Peru.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Evidence-Based Nursing/organization & administration , Nursing Informatics/organization & administration , Professional Competence/standards , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , Medical Informatics/organization & administration , Peru
15.
Int J Health Plann Manage ; 36(S1): 14-19, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318704

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is raising new questions on public health competences and leadership and on health workforce preparedness for global public health emergencies. The present commentary aims to highlight demand and opportunities for innovation through the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 crisis. We review the public health competency framework recently launched by WHO and ASPHER through the lens of COVID-19. The framework provides guidance for aligning public health and global health competences across sectors and professional groups. Five critical competency areas can be identified in relation to public health emergencies: (1) flexibility, adaptation, motivation, communication, (2) research, analytical sensitivity, ethics, diversity, (3) epidemiology, (4) preparedness and (5) employability. However, this may not be enough. New models of public health leadership and changes in the health workforce are needed, which transform the silos of professions and policy. Such transformations would include learning, working, leading and governing differently and must stretch far beyond the public health workforce. To achieve transformative capacity, critical public health competences must be considered for all healthcare workers on all levels of policymaking, thus becoming the 'heart' of health workforce resilience and pandemic preparedness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Health Workforce/standards , Pandemics , Professional Competence , Public Health , Humans , Leadership , SARS-CoV-2
16.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254823, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318323

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Mechanical conditions of vehicles may play a determinant role in driving safety, the reason why vehicle periodical technical inspections (VTIs) are mandatory in many countries. However, the high number of drivers sanctioned for not complying with this regulation is surprisingly high, and there is not much evidence on what kind(s) of motives may explain this concerning panorama. This study aimed to identify the aspects that modulate the relationship between complying (or not) with VTI's standards in a nationwide sample of Spanish drivers. The study design also addressed the drivers' awareness regarding different risky behaviors while driving, depending on their sex and their crash record. METHODS: 1,100 Spanish drivers completed a survey on the aforementioned issues. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc adjustment was conducted to assess significant differences (p<0.05) in the study variables. RESULTS: Most of the surveyed drivers (99.18%) reported that they always comply with VTI's requirements. The main reasons to comply were related to compliance with traffic regulation and fear of penalties, while the reasons attributed to its incompliance are, instead, stated as involuntary. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study support the idea that more actions are needed to increase drivers' awareness of the relevance of VTIs for road safety, as well as warning them about the dangers of neglecting vehicle checking beyond merely punishing measures. For this reason and given the greater prevalence of the issue among younger segments of the driving population, it is suggested that more emphasis on the matter could be made during novice driver's training.


Subject(s)
Accidents, Traffic/prevention & control , Automobile Driving/standards , Automobiles/standards , Humans , Professional Competence/standards , Risk-Taking , Spain , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Hum Resour Health ; 19(1): 80, 2021 07 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304406

ABSTRACT

In the European free movement zone, various mechanisms aim to harmonize how the competence of physicians and nurses is developed and maintained to facilitate the cross-country movement of professionals. This commentary addresses these mechanisms and discusses their implications during the COVID-19 pandemic, drawing lessons for future policy. It argues that EU-wide regulatory mechanisms should be reviewed to ensure that they provide an adequate foundation for determining competence and enabling health workforce flexibility during health system shocks. Currently, EU regulation focuses on the automatic recognition of the primary education of physicians and nurses. New, flexible mechanisms should be developed for specializations, such as intensive or emergency care. Documenting new skills, such as the ones acquired during rapid training in the pandemic, in a manner that is comparable across countries should be explored, both for usual practice and in light of outbreak preparedness. Initiatives to strengthen continuing education and professional development should be supported further. Funding under the EU4Health programme should be dedicated to this endeavour, along with revisiting the scope of necessary skills following the experience of COVID-19. Mechanisms for cross-country sharing of information on violations of good practice standards should be maintained and strengthened to enable agile reactions when the need for professional mobility becomes urgent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Continuing/standards , Health Workforce/standards , International Cooperation , Professional Competence/standards , Europe/epidemiology , Guideline Adherence/standards , Humans , Information Dissemination , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(5): Doc90, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295612

ABSTRACT

Background: In the bachelor degree program Interprofessional Health Care that combines professional training and study, students work part-time in their chosen professions after completing training. The increase in students' working hours due to COVID-19 and the switch to a digital teaching format raised the question as to how a successful and flexible educational concept can be created online in this context. A blended-learning strategy in combination with a competency model for interprofessional learning was chosen as theoretical reference point for implementation. Based on a module for academic poster presentation in front of an interprofessional plenum, the sequence of the learning process organization in the phases "kick-off", "self-directed learning" and "online seminar" is exemplified and discussed with regard to its suitability for digital interprofessional teaching. Implementation: During implementation it was important to clearly define the module's scope and sequence at the very beginning. The use of screencasts enabled students to individually pace their learning during the preparatory self-directed learning phase. Embedding assignments in the screencasts served to aid students in their learning. The synchronous exchange in interprofessional small groups was experienced as profitable for the own poster production. Several students perceive their own poster presentation in digital format as an increase in competence and a basis for future academic presentations. Summary: In summary, the entire interprofessional module was successfully implemented digitally in the phases "kick-off", "self-directed learning" and "online seminar". For synchronous learning, virtual small group workspaces seem particularly suitable for learner activation. The practical implementation of the acquired competencies in the form of the poster presentation is crucial for ensuring the learning success.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Curriculum , Health Occupations/education , Internet , Interprofessional Education/methods , Pandemics , Academic Success , Humans , Learning , Professional Competence , Students , Teaching
19.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(5): Doc87, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295609

ABSTRACT

At the start of the COVID-pandemic in March 2020, the Institutes of Veterinary Anatomy of the five German educational institutions were confronted with the challenge of digitalising all lectures for the second and fourth semesters of veterinary students. After an online kick-off event and a preliminary status quo meeting, available digital teaching material was exchanged for students to stream from learning platforms. Lectures were either synchronized or made available as audio recordings and connotated slides on the learning platforms. Fortunately, digital microscopic slides had already been in use, which made it easy for students to access them. Dissection exercises mostly consisted of self-study, using instructive videos and interactive exercises. In the second half of the semester, four of the educational institutions were able to offer a restricted number of in-person gross anatomy classes under reinforced conditions. Success monitoring took place online through different formats, and partially on a voluntary basis, via the learning platforms. Although the past two semesters had to almost exclusively take place online due to the unprecedented circumstances, and joint efforts of the five veterinary institutions, there is a general consensus that the practical education in anatomy, histology and embryology is essential to veterinary students. In fact, it is the only way they can obtain the necessary skills to successfully complete the rest of their degree.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Veterinary/methods , Pandemics , Schools, Veterinary , Teaching , Audiovisual Aids , Digital Technology , Dissection , Germany , Humans , Internet , Microscopy , Physical Distancing , Professional Competence , Students , Universities , Veterinary Medicine
20.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(5): Doc86, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295608

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of the project is to teach clinical practical and communication skills in the Clinical Skills Lab (CSL) of the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation (TiHo) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methodology: As a measure to limit potential SARS-CoV2 infections, the CSL learning stations were digitised and made available on the Moodle learning platform of the TiHo. Online quiz stations were also developed, as well as improvisations that allowed students to practise practical skills at home using everyday materials. Courses for Practical Year (PY) students were digitised and again combined with classroom exercises throughout the year. The teaching formats could be evaluated by the students by means of a questionnaire using a Likert scale (1=agree; 4=disagree). Results: A total of 24.92% of students (n=1272) completed the learning stations with improvisations. The quiz stations were completed with a percentage of 75.08%. Students indicated that the improvisations were easily implementable from home (M=1.33) and assisted in learning the practical skills in question (M=1.89). The quiz stations were considered helpful (M=1.40) and complementary to previous CSL offers (M=1.13). The PY students found the amount of teaching materials adequate (M=1.76) and described communication with the lecturers as problem-free (compulsory electives=1.24). Conclusions: Digital teaching is suitable as a supplement to existing face-to-face courses at the CSL, but cannot replace on-site training under the guidance of trained personnel. The CSL will continue to strive for a combination of online and face-to-face courses for some learning stations in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Veterinary/methods , Internet , Pandemics , Professional Competence , Teaching , Audiovisual Aids , Communication , Digital Technology , Educational Measurement , Germany , Humans , Learning , Physical Distancing , Schools, Veterinary , Students , Universities , Veterinary Medicine
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