Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Aust J Rural Health ; 30(2): 197-207, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662231

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate students' perceptions of the impact of coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 on rural and remote placements facilitated by 16 University Departments of Rural Health in Australia in 2020. DESIGN: A mixed-method design comprising an online survey and semi-structured interviews. SETTING: Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Allied health, nursing and medical students with a planned University Departments of Rural Health-facilitated rural or remote placement between February and October 2020. INTERVENTION: A planned rural or remote placement in 2020 facilitated by a University Departments of Rural Health, regardless of placement outcome. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Questionnaire included placement outcome (completed or not), discipline of study (nursing, allied health, medicine), and Likert measures of impact to placement (including supervision, placement tasks, location, accommodation, client contact and student learning) and placement experience (overall, support, supervision, university support). Semi-structured interviews asked about placement planning, outcome, decisions, experience and student perceptions. RESULTS: While coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 reportedly impacted on the majority of planned placements, most students (80%) were able to complete their University Departments of Rural Health-facilitated placement in some form and were satisfied with their placement experience. Common placement changes included changes to tasks, setting, supervisors and location. Allied health students were significantly more likely to indicate that their placement had been impacted and also felt more supported by supervisors and universities than nursing students. Interview participants expressed concerns regarding the potential impact of cancelled and adapted placements on graduation and future employment. CONCLUSIONS: The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 pandemic was reported to impact the majority of University Departments of Rural Health-facilitated rural and remote placements in 2020. Fortunately, most students were able to continue to undertake a rural or remote placement in some form and were largely satisfied with their placement experience. Students were concerned about their lack of clinical learning and graduating on time with adequate clinical competence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rural Health Services , Students, Medical , Australia , Humans , Professional Practice Location , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Hum Resour Health ; 19(1): 29, 2021 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115227

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the 2008 recession, Ireland has experienced large-scale doctor emigration. This paper seeks to ascertain whether (and how) the COVID-19 pandemic might disrupt or reinforce existing patterns of doctor emigration. METHOD: This paper draws on qualitative interviews with 31 hospital doctors in Ireland, undertaken in June-July 2020. As the researchers were subject to a government mandated work-from-home order at that time, they utilised Twitter™ to contact potential respondents (snowball sampling); and conducted interviews via Zoom™ or telephone. FINDINGS: Two cohorts of doctors were identified; COVID Returners (N = 12) and COVID Would-be Emigrants (N = 19). COVID Returners are Irish-trained emigrant doctors who returned to Ireland in March 2020, just as global travel ground to a halt. They returned to be closer to home and in response to a pandemic-related recruitment call issued by the Irish government. COVID Would-be Emigrants are hospital doctors considering emigration. Some had experienced pandemic-related disruptions to their emigration plans as a result of travel restrictions and border closures. However, most of the drivers of emigration mentioned by respondents related to underlying problems in the Irish health system rather than to the pandemic, i.e. a culture of medical emigration, poor working conditions and the limited availability of posts in the Irish health system. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: This paper illustrates how the pandemic intensified and reinforced, rather than radically altered, the dynamics of doctor emigration from Ireland. Ireland must begin to prioritise doctor retention and return by developing a coherent policy response to the underlying drivers of doctor emigration.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Emigration and Immigration , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Physicians , Professional Practice Location , Adult , Economic Recession , Emigrants and Immigrants , Foreign Medical Graduates , Humans , Ireland , Motivation , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Travel
5.
Pan Afr Med J ; 37: 28, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-836414

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a rapidly growing pandemic that has grown from a few cases in Wuhan, China to millions of infections and hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide within a few months. Sub-Saharan Africa is not spared. Radiology has a key role to play in the diagnosis and management of COVID-19 as literature from Wuhan and Italy demonstrates. We therefore share some critical knowledge and practice areas for radiological suspicion and diagnosis. In addition, emphasis on how guarding against healthcare acquired infections (HAIs) by applying "red" and "green" principle is addressed. Given that pandemics such as COVID-19 can worsen the strain on the scantily available radiological resources in this region, we share some practical points that can be applied to manage these precious resources also needed for other essential services. We have noted that radiology does not feature in many main COVID-19 guidelines, regionally and internationally. This paper therefore suggests areas of collaboration for radiology with other clinical and management teams. We note from our local experience that radiology can play a role in COVID-19 surveillance.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Professional Practice Location/trends , Radiology/organization & administration , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross Infection/transmission , Disease Outbreaks/ethics , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Health Resources , Humans , Knowledge , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Grad Med Educ ; 12(4): 507-511, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745231

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The start of a new academic year in graduate medical education will mark a transition for postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents from medical school into residency. The relocation of individuals has significant implications given the COVID-19 pandemic and variability of the outbreak across the United States, but little is known about the extent of the geographic relocation taking place. OBJECTIVE: We reported historical trends of PGY-1 residents staying in-state and those starting residency from out-of-state to quantify the geographic movement of individuals beginning residency training each year. METHODS: We analyzed historical data collected by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in academic years 2016-2017, 2017-2018, and 2018-2019, comparing the locations of medical school and residency programs for PGY-1 residents to determine the number of matriculants from in-state medical schools and out-of-state medical schools. International medical school graduates (IMGs) were shown separately in the analysis and then combined with out-of-state matriculants. US citizens who trained abroad were counted among IMGs. RESULTS: The total number of PGY-1s increased by 10.3% during the 3-year time period, from 29 338 to 32 348. When combined, IMGs and USMGs transitioning from one state or country to another state accounted for approximately 72% of PGY-1s each year. Approximately 63% of USMGs matriculated to a residency program in a new state, and IMGs made up 24.6% to 23.1% of PGY-1s over the 3-year period. CONCLUSIONS: Each year brings a substantial amount of movement among PGY-1s that highlights the need for policies and procedures specific to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Professional Practice Location , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Education, Medical , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Foreign Medical Graduates , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Workplace
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL