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2.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 108(3): 494-497, 2020 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743487
3.
J Ambul Care Manage ; 43(4): 312-316, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733334

ABSTRACT

The ongoing pandemic has disrupted the health care system, creating challenges for health care workers and patients alike. As workflows and job responsibilities have been adapted to provide care to coronavirus-infected patients, many primary care services have been postponed. This change has led to significant financial impacts that will be difficult to overcome. Ambulatory care pharmacists can help fill gaps both in access to primary care services and in the financial deficit, if given the opportunity to practice at the top of their skillset and bill for their face-to-face and telehealth services both during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pharmacists , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Professional Role , Betacoronavirus , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Pandemics , United States/epidemiology
5.
J Ambul Care Manage ; 43(4): 301-305, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733330

ABSTRACT

Over 100 Community Health Representatives (CHRs) as part of the oldest and largest Community Health Worker (CHW) program in the United States serve the Dine People on the Navajo Nation. The CHRs work under a tribally determined scope of practice that embraces the importance of self-determination of tribal nations, a philosophy central to the CHW field nationally. Navajo CHRs are the epitome of frontline workers, as they extend their traditional role to encompass long-term emergency response during coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). This article describes the Navajo CHR role in the pandemic through the lens of an interview with the program's director, Mae-Gilene Begay.


Subject(s)
Community Health Workers , Coronavirus Infections/ethnology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Indians, North American , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Professional Role , United States Indian Health Service/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , Humans , Pandemics , United States/epidemiology
6.
Front Health Serv Manage ; 37(1): 27-32, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-730515

ABSTRACT

As community transmission of COVID-19 first emerged in the United States and then quickly spread, America's military accepted an important role in responding to the growing pandemic. The Department of Defense (DOD) rapidly mobilized and deployed personnel, expeditionary medical capabilities, supplies, and equipment to hot spots across the country. How does a military with an expeditionary focus and armed for war abroad quickly pivot to support national response efforts to a public health crisis here at home? Coinciding with the DOD's established flexible response methodology, the US Army adapted a three-pronged approach to prevent, detect, and treat COVID-19 while protecting the force and safeguarding the American people. This approach is providing strategic and operational lessons for improving healthcare delivery, informing public health decisions, and allocating healthcare resources for future pandemic response and civil emergency support efforts.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Military Medicine/organization & administration , Military Personnel , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Professional Role , United States
7.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 17: E74, 2020 07 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690380

ABSTRACT

Medically underserved patients in rural areas are more vulnerable to poor health outcomes, including the risks associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Pharmacists, student pharmacists, and other health care professionals are working together to implement new, innovative ways to deliver the same standard of care during the COVID-19 pandemic to these vulnerable patients. These services include telehealth with virtual and telephone medication therapy management sessions led by ambulatory care pharmacists and student pharmacists. Pharmacists, student pharmacists, and other health care professionals should continue to adapt to these new technologies to improve health outcomes for their patients during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Medically Underserved Area , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pharmacists/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Rural Population , Chronic Disease , Community Pharmacy Services , Florida , Humans , Medication Therapy Management/organization & administration , Professional Role , Telemedicine
9.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 17: E69, 2020 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671674

ABSTRACT

Community pharmacists assist patients to manage disease and prevent complications. Despite the enormous challenge the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has dealt to the health care system, community pharmacists have maintained the delivery of critical health services to communities, including those most at risk for COVID-19. Community pharmacists are in a key position to deliver priority pandemic responses including point-of-care testing for chronic disease management, vaccinations, and COVID-19 testing.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Community Pharmacy Services/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pharmacists , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Professional Role , Adult , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Disease Management , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Point-of-Care Testing , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
11.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8146, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646989

ABSTRACT

This commentary, written primarily by a recent pharmacy graduate, discusses the impact of COVID-19 on the class of 2020. Everyone has been impacted by COVID-19, but pharmacy students have been affected by and experienced COVID-19 in unique ways. This was the first class to complete pharmacy practice experiences in an online format, miss out on milestone events including graduation, and face uncertainty about becoming licensed and entering the job market in the midst of a pandemic. However, instead of discouraging them, these events have in many ways strengthened the resilience of the class of 2020. Additionally, COVID-19 has highlighted the importance of continued advocacy for the profession and articulation of the pharmacist's expanded role and value to the health care team, and inspired the class of 2020 to join the ranks of colleagues nationwide in raising awareness in these areas. Nevertheless, uncertainty over their future and that of their peers lingers as COVID-19 has forever changed pharmacy education and practice.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Students, Pharmacy/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Professional Role , Resilience, Psychological
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(13)2020 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635459

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is the disease supported by SARS-CoV-2 infection, which causes a severe form of pneumonia. Due to the pathophysiological characteristics of the COVID-19 syndrome, the particular transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2, and the high globalization of our era, the epidemic emergency from China has spread rapidly all over the world. Human-to-human transmission seems to occur mainly through close contact with symptomatic people affected by COVID-19, and the main way of contagion is via the inhalation of respiratory droplets, for example when patients talk, sneeze or cough. The ability of the virus to survive outside living organisms, in aerosol or on fomites has also been recognized. The dental practitioners are particularly exposed to a high risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection because they cannot always respect the interpersonal distance of more than a meter and are exposed to saliva, blood, and other body fluids during surgical procedures. Moreover, many dental surgeries can generate aerosol, and the risk of airborne infection is to be considered higher. The aim of this paper is to provide practical advice for dentists based on the recent literature, which may be useful in reducing the risk of spreading COVID-19 during clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dental Care/methods , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Patterns, Dentists'/standards , Betacoronavirus , Dental Care/standards , Dentists , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Mass Screening , Personal Protective Equipment , Professional Role
15.
Educ Prim Care ; 31(4): 200-204, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615285

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically impacted undergraduate medical studies. Whilst challenges for knowledge and clinical skills are being actively addressed, wider considerations such as the impact on professional identity development have been mostly neglected thus far. A robust professional identity is linked to professional behaviour and has been shown to reduce burnout and be an important factor for general practice career choice amongst medical students. The Communities of Practice Model is a sociocultural approach that conceptualises the formation of professional identity through student engagement within a community. We argue the current suspension of clinical placements holds the potential to negatively influence such identity acquisition. In this commentary we explore how the Communities of Practice Model may inform professional identity development of medical students within the COVID-19 environment, considering digital communities and volunteering roles within primary care. We further encourage educators and institutions to consider professional identity in future planning to address the challenges posed by the current situation, both in terms of placement loss but also changes in the way primary care is delivered. Such considerations will be essential if we are to avoid problems relating to poor medical student professional identity development in future.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Professional Role , Social Identification , Students, Medical/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , Primary Health Care , Volunteers
16.
Br Dent J ; 228(12): 916-918, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614896

ABSTRACT

To limit the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), Britain enforced a strict national lockdown, which is affecting the lives of millions, including dental professionals. As a result, all routine dental work has been suspended and general dental practitioners (GDPs) are inevitably faced with financial difficulties, as well as an impending strain on dental services once the lockdown is lifted. In contrast, South Korea (SK) has effectively managed to keep the virus at bay without a lockdown and continues to deliver routine dental care throughout this period. This article compares the current status of primary dental care in the UK and SK under COVID-19, in order to explore how the dental profession can better mitigate the repercussions of a future epidemic crisis.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Dentists , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Professional Role , Betacoronavirus , Dental Care , Humans , Republic of Korea
19.
Farm Hosp ; 44(7): 32-35, 2020 06 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599569

ABSTRACT

The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the University Hospital of Fuenlabrada was  forced to critically increase its capacity in the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective of this work is to describe the activities promoted by the pharmacist in the care  of the critically ill patient in this context. A new organizational structure was  designed, analyzing the tasks necessary to make the processes profitable. Two  pharmacists joined the critical patient care to help the pharmacist who was  already integrated in the ICU team. The development of the operational  structure was carried out on three levels. The healthcare activity highlights the  daily participation of pharmacists in the two clinical sessions in which the ICU  teams evaluated all cases and made decisions. This in turn facilitated the  pharmaceutical validation that was carried out in the critical units themselves. In addition, one of the pharmacists created the Immuno-COVID Committee, in  which they participated together with different specialists for therapeutic  decision-making in the most complex cases. On the other hand, the availability  of human and material resources allowed the implantation of centralized  elaboration in the Pharmacy Service of many intravenous mixtures, including  antibiotics elastomers Pumps for continuous infusion, and non-sterile  elaborations. In logistics management, in addition to the acquisition of COVID- 19 therapies, the reconciliation with nursing activity stands out. The physical presence of the pharmacist favored the detection of needs, the  availability in time of medications in the unit, including sterile and non-sterile  preparations, and coordination with the central pharmacy. In knowledge  management, the participation of the pharmacist in the working group for the  development of the hospital management protocol COVID-19 stands out. The  daily presence in the unit and the joint work with the entire multidisciplinary team demonstrate the value that the pharmacist can bring. In addition to  efficient resource management, support for clinical decision-making and  improvement actions, it provides the climate of inter-professional trust necessary to respond to the complexity of the critical patient and promote joint  projects.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Pharmacists , Pneumonia, Viral , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care , Decision Making , Disease Management , Equipment and Supplies, Hospital/supply & distribution , Health Services Needs and Demand , Hospitals, University , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Interdisciplinary Communication , Patient Care Team , Pharmaceutical Preparations/supply & distribution , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Professional Role , Spain/epidemiology
20.
BMJ Glob Health ; 5(6)2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-596594

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), affects 213 countries or territories globally. We received a request from National Health Systems Resource Centre, a public agency in India, to conduct rapid evidence synthesis (RES) on community health workers (CHWs) for COVID-19 prevention and control in 3 days. METHODS: We searched PubMed, websites of ministries (n=3), public agencies (n=6), multilateral institutions (n=3), COVID-19 resource aggregators (n=5) and preprints (n=1) (without language restrictions) for articles on CHWs in pandemics. Two reviewers screened the records independently with a third reviewer resolving disagreements. One reviewer extracted data with another reviewer cross-checking it. A framework on CHW performance in primary healthcare not specific to pandemic was used to guide data extraction and narrative analysis. RESULTS: We retrieved 211 records and finally included 36 articles. Most of the evidence was from low-and middle-income countries with well-established CHW programmes. Evidence from CHW programmes initiated during pandemics and for CHW involvement in pandemic response in high-income countries was scant. CHW roles and tasks change substantially during pandemics. Clear guidance, training for changed roles and definition of what constitutes essential activities (ie, those that must to be sustained) is required. Most common additional activities during pandemics were community awareness, engagement and sensitisation (including for countering stigma) and contact tracing. CHWs were reported to be involved in all aspects of contact tracing - this was reported to affect routine service delivery. CHWs have often been stigmatised or been socially ostracised during pandemics. Providing PPE, housing allowance, equal training opportunities, transportation allowance, improving salaries (paid on time and for a broad range of services) and awards in high-profile public events contributed to better recruitment and retention. We also created inventories of resources with guiding notes on guidelines for health workers (n=24), self-isolation in the community (n=10) and information, education and counselling materials on COVID-19 (n=16). CONCLUSIONS: CHWs play a critical role in pandemics. It is important to ensure role clarity, training, supportive supervision, as well as their work satisfaction, health and well-being. More implementation research on CHWs in pandemics is required.


Subject(s)
Community Health Workers , Coronavirus Infections , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Professional Role , Betacoronavirus , Community Health Services , Community Health Workers/organization & administration , Community Health Workers/standards , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Decision Making , Humans , India , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
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