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1.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 22-30, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612687

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the perceptions and experiences of nurses caring for patients and families under the COVID-19 pandemic's socially restrictive practices and policies. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 global pandemic has affected the delivery of health care to patients and their families, with many aspects altered because of the need for social distancing, social isolation, and visitation restriction policies. These policies have created communication challenges for interdisciplinary health care teams, patients, and families. As frontline caregivers, nurses have felt strongly the impact of these challenges. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted among 17 RNs who were caring for patients during the COVID-19 pandemic and were recruited via social media posts on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Watson's theory of human caring served as the conceptual framework for the study. RESULTS: Several themes emerged regarding nurses' experiences of communication with patients and families. These include communication challenges and barriers, prioritization, integration of group communication, nurse self-reflection, and acceptance of gratitude. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings underscore the importance of nurses' communication with patients and families under the pandemic's restricted conditions. They demonstrate the value of nurses' ability to innovate in fostering all parties' participation in the plan of care, and highlight the comfort nurses provide to patients who are isolated from loved ones. Strategies that fostered communication were identified, as were areas for further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Empathy , Nurses/psychology , Professional-Family Relations , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Interviews as Topic/methods , Nurses/trends , Qualitative Research
3.
JAMA ; 326(14): 1373-1374, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490617
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470845

ABSTRACT

Smartphone-enabled, telehealth-based family conferences represent an attractive and safe alternative to deliver communication during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, some may fear that the therapeutic relationship might be filtered due to a lack of direct human contact. The study aims to explore whether shared decision-making model combining VALUE (Value family statements, Acknowledge emotions, Listen, Understand the patient as a person, Elicit questions) and PLACE (Prepare with intention, Listen intently and completely, Agree on what matters most, Connect with the patient's story, Explore emotional cues) framework can help physicians respond empathetically to emotional cues and foster human connectedness in a virtual context. Twenty-five virtual family conferences were conducted in a national medical center in Taiwan. The expression of verbal emotional distress was noted in 20% of patients and 20% of family members, while nonverbal distress was observed in 24% and 28%, respectively. On 10-point Likert scale, the satisfaction score was 8.7 ± 1.5 toward overall communication and 9.0 ± 1.1 on meeting the family's needs. Adopting SDM concepts with VALUE and PLACE approaches helps physicians foster connectedness in telehealth family conferences. The model has high participant satisfaction scores and may improve healthcare quality among the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Communication , Decision Making , Decision Making, Shared , Family , Humans , Pandemics , Professional-Family Relations , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 183, 2021 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403252

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physicians play a key role in driving vaccine acceptance and their recommendations are crucial to address vaccine hesitancy. The aim of the study was to assess knowledge, awareness and attitude of Italian Pediatric Health Care Professionals (pHCPs) on vaccinations. METHODS: An anonymous on-line questionnaire was developed within the Vaccine Committee of Italian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (SIAIP) and spontaneously completed by 231 Pediatricians and Pediatric Nurses (PN). RESULTS: An accurate vaccine education was reported by 70% of pediatricians and 13% of PN but 11% of pediatricians versus 26% of PN consult social media instead of scientific sources for their vaccine update. The investigation on the pHCPs attitudes to vaccination in a personal and family setting highlights poor adherence to vaccinations. Only 63% of pediatricians versus 16% of PN (p < 0.0001) annually received the Flu vaccine. In their family setting 93% of pediatricians versus 51% of PN recommended all vaccinations (p < 0.0001). Anti-flu, anti-rotavirus, anti-zoster and anti-pneumococcal vaccines were not regularly recommended by all pHCPs due to doubts of uselessness (55% of pediatricians versus 40% of PN) and preference for "natural immunity" (44% of pediatricians versus 40% of PN). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that pHCPs' attitude and confidence in regards to vaccines remain suboptimal. Current COVID-19 pandemic and the rapid development of vaccines could increase vaccine hesitancy. Due to the documented pHCPs' influence in the parental decision, educational interventions are needed to improve their level of knowledge and counselling skills in order to address parental vaccine hesitancy and to maintain continuity of immunization services.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pediatric Nursing , Pediatricians/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Professional-Family Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Refusal
8.
Heart Lung ; 50(6): 926-932, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347620

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The family members of a patient admitted to a COVID Intensive Care Unit (COVID-ICU) could not communicate with and stay close to their loved one, which resulted in them becoming dependent on hospital staff for remote updates. OBJECTIVE: To describe the lived experiences of families with a member admitted to a COVID-ICU. METHODS: A phenomenological study was conducted. The subjects were interviewed with open-ended questions to allow them full freedom of expression. The researchers involved in the analysis immersed themselves in the data, independently reading and rereading the transcripts to gain a sense of the entire dataset. RESULTS: Fourteen first-degree family members were recruited. Five main themes emerged: fear, detachment, life on standby, family-related loneliness in the COVID-ICU, and an unexpected event. CONCLUSIONS: Knowing the experience of families who have a relative in the COVID-ICU is essential for recognizing and reducing the risk of developing symptoms of post-intensive care syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family , Critical Illness , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Professional-Family Relations
10.
Am J Crit Care ; 30(4): 256-265, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325840

ABSTRACT

Communication is the essence of the nurse-patient relationship. The critical care nurse's role in facilitating patient communication and enabling communication between patients and their families has never been more important or poignant than during the COVID-19 pandemic. We have witnessed tremendous examples of resourceful, caring nurses serving as the primary communication partner and support for isolated seriously ill patients during this pandemic. However, evidence-based tools and techniques for assisting awake, communication-impaired, seriously ill patients to communicate are not yet systematically applied across all settings. Missed communication or misinterpretation of patients' messages induces panic and fear in patients receiving mechanical ventilation and can have serious deleterious consequences. This lecture presents a 23-year program of research in developing and testing combination interventions (eg, training, tailored assessment, and tools) for best practice in facilitating patient communication during critical illness. Evidence from related nursing and inter pro fessional research is also included. Guidance for unit-based assessment, tailoring, and implementation of evidence-based patient communication protocols also is provided.


Subject(s)
Communication , Critical Care Nursing , Intensive Care Units , Nurse-Patient Relations , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Nurse's Role , Pandemics , Professional-Family Relations , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 7: CD013706, 2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317491

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infectious diseases are a major cause of illness and death among older adults. Vaccines can prevent infectious diseases, including against seasonal influenza, pneumococcal diseases, herpes zoster and COVID-19. However, the uptake of vaccination among older adults varies across settings and groups. Communication with healthcare workers can play an important role in older people's decisions to vaccinate. To support an informed decision about vaccination, healthcare workers should be able to identify the older person's knowledge gaps, needs and concerns. They should also be able to share and discuss information about the person's disease risk and disease severity; the vaccine's effectiveness and safety; and practical information about how the person can access vaccines. Therefore, healthcare workers need good communication skills and to actively keep up-to-date with the latest evidence. An understanding of their perceptions and experiences of this communication can help us train and support healthcare workers and design good communication strategies. OBJECTIVES: To explore healthcare workers' perceptions and experiences of communicating with older adults about vaccination. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL and Scopus on 21 March 2020. We also searched Epistemonikos for related reviews, searched grey literature sources, and carried out reference checking and citation searching to identify additional studies. We searched for studies in any language. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included qualitative studies and mixed-methods studies with an identifiable qualitative component. We included studies that explored the perceptions and experiences of healthcare workers and other health system staff towards communication with adults over the age of 50 years or their informal caregivers about vaccination. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We extracted data using a data extraction form designed for this review. We assessed methodological limitations using a list of predefined criteria. We extracted and assessed data regarding study authors' motivations for carrying out their study. We used a thematic synthesis approach to analyse and synthesise the evidence. We used the GRADE-CERQual (Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative research) approach to assess our confidence in each finding. We examined each review finding to identify factors that may influence intervention implementation and we developed implications for practice. MAIN RESULTS: We included 11 studies in our review. Most studies explored healthcare workers' views and experiences about vaccination of older adults more broadly but also mentioned communication issues specifically. All studies were from high-income countries. The studies focused on doctors, nurses, pharmacists and others working in hospitals, clinics, pharmacies and nursing homes. These healthcare workers discussed different types of vaccines, including influenza, pneumococcal and herpes zoster vaccines. The review was carried out before COVID-19 vaccines were available. We downgraded our confidence in several of the findings from high confidence to moderate, low or very low confidence. One reason for this was that some findings were based on only small amounts of data. Another reason was that the findings were based on studies from only a few countries, making us unsure about the relevance of these findings to other settings. Healthcare workers reported that older adults asked about vaccination to different extents, ranging from not asking about vaccines at all, to great demand for information (high confidence finding). When the topic of vaccination was discussed, healthcare workers described a lack of information, and presence of misinformation, fears and concerns about vaccines among older adults (moderate confidence). The ways in which healthcare workers discussed vaccines with older adults appeared to be linked to what they saw as the aim of vaccination communication. Healthcare workers differed among themselves in their perceptions of this aim and about their own roles and the roles of older adults in vaccine decisions. Some healthcare workers thought it was important to provide information but emphasised the right and responsibility of older adults to decide for themselves. Others used information to persuade and convince older adults to vaccinate in order to increase 'compliance' and 'improve' vaccination rates, and in some cases to gain financial benefits. Other healthcare workers tailored their approach to what they believed the older adult needed or wanted (moderate confidence). Healthcare workers believed that older adults' decisions could be influenced by several factors, including the nature of the healthcare worker-patient relationship, the healthcare worker's status, and the extent to which healthcare workers led by example (low confidence). Our review also identified factors that are likely to influence how communication between healthcare workers and older adults take place. These included issues tied to healthcare workers' views and experiences regarding the diseases in question and the vaccines; as well as their views and experiences of the organisational and practical implementation of vaccine services. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is little research focusing specifically on healthcare workers' perceptions and experiences of communication with older adults about vaccination. The studies we identified suggest that healthcare workers differed among themselves in their perceptions about the aim of this communication and about the role of older adults in vaccine decisions. Based on these findings and the other findings in our review, we have developed a set of questions or prompts that may help health system planners or programme managers when planning or implementing strategies for vaccination communication between healthcare workers and older adults.


Subject(s)
Communication , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccines/administration & dosage , Age Factors , Aged , Caregivers , Decision Making , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/administration & dosage , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Persuasive Communication , Pneumococcal Vaccines/administration & dosage , Professional-Family Relations , Qualitative Research , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
12.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254077, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295523

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurse identification of patient deterioration is critical, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, as patients can deteriorate quickly. While the literature has shown that nurses rely on intuition to make decisions, there is limited information on what sources of data experienced nurses utilize to inform their intuition. The objectives of this study were to identify sources of data that inform nurse decision-making related to recognition of deteriorating patients, and explore how COVID-19 has impacted nurse decision-making. METHODS: In this qualitative study, experienced nurses voluntarily participated in focused interviews. During focused interviews, expert nurses were asked to share descriptions of memorable patient encounters, and questions were posed to facilitate reflections on thoughts and actions that hindered or helped their decision-making. They were also asked to consider the impact of COVID-19 on nursing and decision-making. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, study team members reviewed transcripts and coded responses, and organized key findings into themes. RESULTS: Several themes related to decision-making were identified by the research team, including: identifying patient care needs, workload management, and reflecting on missed care opportunities to inform learning. Participants (n = 10) also indicated that COVID-19 presented a number of unique barriers to nurse decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study indicate that experienced nurses utilize several sources of information to inform their intuition. It is apparent that the demands on nurses in response to pandemics are heightened. Decision-making themes drawn from participants' experiences can to assist nurse educators for training nursing students on decision-making for deteriorating patients and how to manage the potential barriers (e.g., resource constraints, lack of family) associated with caring for patients during these challenging times prior to encountering these issues in the clinical environment. Nurse practice can utilize these findings to increase awareness among experienced nurses on recognizing how pandemic situations can impact to their decision-making capability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Clinical Decision-Making , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Care/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Nurse-Patient Relations , Nursing Assessment , Professional-Family Relations , Qualitative Research , Symptom Assessment , Workload
13.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(6): e2113355, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274641

ABSTRACT

Importance: During the initial surge of the COVID-19 pandemic, family members were often separated from their loved ones admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), with a potential for negative experiences and psychological burden. Objective: To better understand the experiences of bereaved family members of patients who died in an ICU during the COVID-19 pandemic, from the time of hospital admission until after the patient's death. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study used semistructured, in-depth interviews to collect experiences from bereaved family members of patients who died from severe COVID-19 in 12 ICUs during the first wave of the pandemic in France. Purposeful sampling was used to ensure the diversity of study participants with respect to sex, age, relationship with the patient, and geographic location. All data were collected between June and September 2020, and data analysis was performed from August to November 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Interviews were conducted 3 to 4 months after the patient's death and were audio-recorded and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Among 19 family members interviewed (median [range] age, 46 [23-75] years; 14 [74%] women), 3 major themes emerged from qualitative analysis. The first was the difficulty in building a relationship with the ICU clinicians and dealing with the experience of solitude: family members experienced difficulties in establishing rapport and bonding with the ICU team as well as understanding the medical information. Distance communication was not sufficient, and participants felt it increased the feeling of solitude. The second involved the patient in the ICU and the risks of separation: because of restricted access to the ICU, family members experienced discontinuity and interruptions in the relationship with their loved one, which were associated with feelings of powerlessness, abandonment, and unreality. The third was regarding disruptions in end-of-life rituals: family members described "stolen moments" after the patient's death, generating strong feelings of disbelief that may lead to complicated grief. Conclusions and Relevance: This qualitative study found that during the initial wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in France, bereaved family members described a disturbed experience, both during the ICU stay and after the patient's death. Specific family-centered crisis guidelines are needed to improve experiences for patients, families, and clinicians experiences.


Subject(s)
Bereavement , COVID-19 , Family/psychology , Professional-Family Relations , Adult , Aged , Female , France , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
14.
Hosp Pediatr ; 11(6): 636-649, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238799

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Pediatric family-centered rounds (FCRs) have been shown to have benefits in staff satisfaction, teaching, and rounding efficiency, but no systematic review has been conducted to explicitly examine the humanistic impact of FCRs. OBJECTIVE: The objective with this review is to determine if FCRs promote the core values of humanism in medicine by answering the question, "Do FCRs promote humanistic pediatric care?" DATA SOURCES: Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, we conducted a search of PubMed, Web of Science, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Dissertation Abstracts for peer-reviewed pediatric studies through January 1, 2020. We used search terms including FCRs, communication, humanism, and the specific descriptors in the Gold Foundation's definition of humanism. STUDY SELECTION: Abstracts (n = 1003) were assessed for 5 primary outcomes: empathy, enhanced communication, partnership, respect, and satisfaction and service. We evaluated 158 full-text articles for inclusion, reconciling discrepancies through an iterative process. DATA EXTRACTION: Data abstraction, thematic analysis, and conceptual synthesis were conducted on 29 studies. RESULTS: Pediatric family-centered rounds (FCRs) improved humanistic outcomes within all 5 identified themes. Not all studies revealed improvement within every category. The humanistic benefits of FCRs are enhanced through interventions targeted toward provider-family barriers, such as health literacy. Patients with limited English proficiency or disabilities or who were receiving intensive care gained additional benefits. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric FCRs promote humanistic outcomes including increased empathy, partnership, respect, service, and communication. Limitations included difficulty in defining humanism, variable implementation, and inconsistent reporting of humanistic outcomes. Future efforts should include highlighting FCR's humanistic benefits, universal implementation, and adapting FCRs to pandemics such as coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Humanism , Pediatrics/methods , Professional-Family Relations , Teaching Rounds/methods , Child , Child, Hospitalized , Communication , Empathy , Humans
15.
Fam Syst Health ; 39(1): 165-166, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236067

ABSTRACT

In this brief article, the author describes how her husband was first diagnosed with mesothelioma, an incidental finding of routine medical testing. His first surgery was timed to the beginnings of coronavirus (COVID) lockdown. The staging of his cancer aligned with a new stage of the pandemic, and by the time of his first chemotherapy appointment, patients were no longer allowed to bring family along for outpatient visits. Although the author is an expert and educator on psychosocial care in medicine, she has found herself at a complete loss, teaching herself the ropes of how to connect with his treatment team and practicing ambiguous advo cacy. Her hus band will be in recovery for a long time; they will both be in recovery. Mesothelioma has robbed them of certainty and safety, as cancer often does, and just as COVID has done, to everyone. We are all living in the question mark, in the ambiguity-the Con nection is our loneliness, our isolation, and the uncertainty. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mesothelioma/psychology , Professional-Family Relations , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Incidental Findings , Loneliness , Male , Mesothelioma/diagnosis , Mesothelioma/therapy , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Uncertainty , Visitors to Patients
17.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(4): 493-500, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218704

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has affected the hospital experience for patients, visitors, and staff. OBJECTIVE: To understand clinician perspectives on adaptations to end-of-life care for dying patients and their families during the pandemic. DESIGN: Mixed-methods embedded study. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04602520). SETTING: 3 acute care medical units in a tertiary care hospital from 16 March to 1 July 2020. PARTICIPANTS: 45 dying patients, 45 family members, and 45 clinicians. INTERVENTION: During the pandemic, clinicians continued an existing practice of collating personal information about dying patients and "what matters most," eliciting wishes, and implementing acts of compassion. MEASUREMENTS: Themes from semistructured clinician interviews that were summarized with representative quotations. RESULTS: Many barriers to end-of-life care arose because of infection control practices that mandated visiting restrictions and personal protective equipment, with attendant practical and psychological consequences. During hospitalization, family visits inside or outside the patient's room were possible for 36 patients (80.0%); 13 patients (28.9%) had virtual visits with a relative or friend. At the time of death, 20 patients (44.4%) had a family member at the bedside. Clinicians endeavored to prevent unmarked deaths by adopting advocacy roles to "fill the gap" of absent family and by initiating new and established ways to connect patients and relatives. LIMITATION: Absence of clinician symptom or wellness metrics; a single-center design. CONCLUSION: Clinicians expressed their humanity through several intentional practices to preserve personalized, compassionate end-of-life care for dying hospitalized patients during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Canadian Critical Care Trials Group Research Coordinator Fund.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Death , COVID-19/epidemiology , Family/psychology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Terminal Care/psychology , Aged , Empathy , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Professional-Family Relations , SARS-CoV-2
18.
N Engl J Med ; 384(17): 1586-1587, 2021 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211319
20.
Am J Crit Care ; 30(4): 302-311, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1191120

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, evidence-based resources have been sought to support decision-making and strategically inform hospitals' policies, procedures, and practices. While greatly emphasizing protection, most guiding documents have neglected to support and protect the psychosocial needs of frontline health care workers and patients and their families during provision of palliative and end-of-life care. Consequently, the stage has been set for increased anxiety, moral distress, and moral injury and extreme moral hazard. A family-centered approach to care has been unilaterally relinquished to a secondary and nonessential role during the current crisis. This phenomenon violates a foundational public health principle, namely, to apply the least restrictive means to achieve good for the many. Instead, there has been widespread adoption of utilitarian and paternalistic approaches. In many cases the foundational principles of palliative care have also been neglected. No circumstance, even a global public health emergency, should ever cause health care providers to deny their ethical obligations and human commitment to compassion. The lack of responsive protocols for family visitation, particularly at the end of life, is an important gap in the current recommendations for pandemic triage and contingency planning. A stepwise approach to hospital visitation using a tiered, standardized process for responding to emerging clinical circumstances and individual patients' needs should be considered, following the principle of proportionality. A contingency plan, based on epidemiological data, is the best strategy to refocus health care ethics in practice now and for the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Empathy , Organizational Policy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Professional-Family Relations , Visitors to Patients , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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