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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736921

ABSTRACT

Empathy and lifelong learning are two professional competencies that depend on the four principles of professionalism: humanism, altruism, excellence, and accountability. In occupational health, there is evidence that empathy prevents work distress. However, in the case of lifelong learning, the evidence is still scarce. In addition, recent studies suggest that the development of lifelong learning varies in physicians and nurses and that it is sensitive to the influence of cultural stereotypes associated with professional roles. This study was performed with the purpose of determining the specific role that empathy and lifelong learning play in the reduction in occupational stress. This study included a sample composed by 40 physicians and 40 nurses with high dedication to clinical work in ambulatory consultations from a public healthcare institution in Paraguay. Somatization, exhaustion, and work alienation, described as indicators of occupational stress, were used as dependent variables, whereas empathy, lifelong learning, gender, discipline, professional experience, civil status, and family burden were used as potential predictors. Three multiple regression models explained 32% of the variability of somatization based on a linear relationship with empathy, lifelong learning, and civil status; 73% of the variability of exhaustion based on a linear relationship with empathy, somatization, work alienation, and discipline; and 62% of the variability of work alienation based on a linear relationship with lifelong learning, exhaustion, and discipline. These findings indicate that empathy and lifelong learning play important roles in the prevention of work distress in physicians and nurses. However, this role varies by discipline.


Subject(s)
Occupational Stress , Physicians , Education, Continuing , Empathy , Humans , Professionalism
2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 780139, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731857

ABSTRACT

Background: A large number of nurses across China joined the anti-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) front-line in Hubei province, where the local healthcare system faced unprecedented challenges in the early 2020. Few studies have reported the psychological experiences of nurses from other regions who voluntarily participated in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Hubei province. Aim: To describe the psychological experiences of nurses who were involved in the anti-COVID-19 pandemic battle in Hubei province from January to April 2020. Methods: This was a qualitative descriptive study using purposive and snowball sampling strategies for participant recruitment. Twenty-four nurses were approached and twenty-one of them completed telephone interviews in April 2020. The interviews took an average of 75 min (range 34-140 min). Data were analyzed thematically after verbatim transcription of the interviews. Results: Our analysis generated three primary themes: (I) Contexts; (II) Psychological responses; and (III) Coping strategies (most participants identified suitable coping strategies including relaxing activities and seeking social support). Participants' psychological responses varied in four phases of the journey through the experience: (i) initiation phase: obligations and concerns/fears; (ii) transition phase: from overwhelmed to increased confidence; (iii) adaptation phase: a sense of achievement and exhaustion; and (iv) completion phase: professional and personal growth. Conclusion: Nurses had concerns, fears, and faced challenges working on the COVID-19 front-line. However, they were motivated by a strong sense of professional commitment. Most nurses successfully achieved personal and professional growth as they identified a range of coping strategies. Future research is needed to explore the long-term impact of the COVID-19 related working experiences on these nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Motivation , Pandemics , Professionalism , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Volunteers/psychology
3.
Oncol Nurs Forum ; 49(2): 101-102, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704046

ABSTRACT

The omicron variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus continues to overwhelm healthcare systems. The anticipated temporary disruption of the COVID-19 pandemic is now in its third year. Across multiple settings, nurses have continued to provide direct care, lead in healthcare organizations and political arenas, conduct research, and teach the next generation of nurses amid a novel virus and politicization of the healthcare infrastructure that has led to enmity toward healthcare providers. This editorial focuses on the next steps for demonstrating gratitude for the nurses who have persisted, continuing to do their jobs and honoring their professional creed in conditions that have extracted personal, professional and, for some, moral costs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Humans , Nurses , Professionalism , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Curr Opin Anaesthesiol ; 35(2): 195-200, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684842

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: COVID-19 pandemic has created profound ethical challenges, not only for clinical decision-making but also for defining physician professional conduct. RECENT FINDINGS: Multiple ethical questions arose as the COVID-19 pandemic ravaged globally, including physician obligations in a pandemic, allotment of personal protective equipment, care of unvaccinated patients, discern between evidence-based and unreliable information, addressing end-of-life wishes, implications of involving medical students in a public health crisis, and finally physician burnout aggravated by a pandemic. SUMMARY: There is a need to redefine existing medical professionalism standards so that future healthcare professionals are well prepared to deal with similar public health crisis.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Professionalism , SARS-CoV-2
5.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262786, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633643

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: It is necessary to identify factors that influence nurses' intention to care for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients to improve the quality of care during the pandemic. This study identifies factors that influence nurses' intention to care for COVID-19 patients, focusing on positive psychological capital and nursing professionalism. METHODS: This study adopted a descriptive correlational design. Data were collected between August 16 and August 30, 2020, through self-administered questionnaires from 148 bedside nurses caring for COVID-19 patients, from four hospitals designated for COVID-19 treatment. Modified versions of the Nursing Intention Questionnaire for SARS Patient Care, Psychological Capital Questionnaire, and Hall's Professional Inventory were used. The collected data were analyzed using stepwise multiple regression. RESULTS: In total, 165 questionnaires were distributed, and 148 questionnaires (89.7%) were included in the final analysis. Factors influencing nurses' intention to care were: age (30<: ß = .18, p = .026; ≥50: ß = .23, p = .005), department (ICU: ß = -.26, p = .001), sufficient clinical experience and skills to care for COVID-19 patients (sufficient: ß = .18, p = .019), and positive psychological capital (ß = .22, p = .044). The model's explanatory power (R2) was 48%. CONCLUSIONS: Strategies to increase nurses' positive psychological capital are necessary to improve nursing care quality by increasing intention to care when facing novel infectious diseases such as COVID-19. Furthermore, adequate education and training on managing novel infectious diseases should be implemented to provide nurses with relevant experience and skills regarding caring for patients infected with these diseases. Through various studies, strategies for improving nurses' positive psychological capital need to be suggested to improve the quality of care by increasing the nurses' intention to care during the emergence of a novel infectious disease, such as COVID-19. Additionally, adequate education and training on managing the novel infectious diseases, sufficient for the nurses to believe they have the experience and skills for caring for the infected patients, will be needed.


Subject(s)
Attitude , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Professionalism , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Self Report , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
J Korean Acad Nurs ; 51(6): 678-688, 2021 Dec.
Article in Korean | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614085

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing nurses' performance of care in COVID-19 wards. METHODS: The participants were 132 nurses who worked in COVID-19 wards at three hospitals, and were recruited from April 1 to May 31, 2021. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, and multiple regression analysis with SPSS/WIN 24.0 program. RESULTS: Nursing performance was significantly and positively correlated with ethical sensitivity (r = .75, p < .001), nursing professionalism (r = .67, p < .001), and social support (r = .67, p < .001). Nursing professionalism was positively correlated with ethical sensitivity (r = .64, p < .001) and social support (r = .55, p < .001). Multiple regression analysis for nursing performance revealed that the most significant factor was ethical sensitivity (ß = .47, p < .001). Ethical sensitivity, nursing professionalism, and social support explained 66.0% of total variance in nursing performance. CONCLUSION: Ethical sensitiviy, nursing professionalism, and social support significantly influence nurses' performace of care in COVID-19 wards. It suggests that intervention programs should be directed at improving nurses' ethical sensitivity, bolstering social support, and enhancing nursing professionalism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Hospitals , Humans , Professionalism , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Work ; 68(4): 969-979, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557738

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Professionalism, stress and demographic factors are the three key influences in nurses' intention to provide care. OBJECTIVES: This study examined the levels of work intention, stress and professionalism of nurses and determine the relationship between nursing work intention and factors in response to COVID-19. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 362 nurses from COVID-19-devoted hospitals in Iran. A self-administered electronic-based questionnaire was developed and used to determine levels of stress, professionalism, and nursing intention. Multiple regression analysis was carried out to analyze the correlation between nursing intention with respect to stress and professionalism. RESULTS: The overall stress, professionalism, and nursing intention scores were 48.56, 21.46, and 17.83 respectively. There were significant differences in nursing intention scores between gender, marital status, and having training groups (p < 0.05). The regression analysis revealed that nursing intention had a significant relationship with older age (p < 0.001,S.E = 1.11,B = 17.02), higher income level (p < 0.001,S.E = 1.81,B = 6.98), having previous training (p = 0.008,S.E = 1.22,B = 3.27), higher stress level (p < 0.001,S.E = 2.37,B = -21.39), and high professionalism level (p < 0.001,S.E = 1.16,B = 11.99). CONCLUSION: Having an adequate staff requirement plan, planning appropriate training for nurses, and proactive psychological support are crucial to prevent burnout and continue to provide nursing services.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Intention , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Professionalism , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Nurse Educ Today ; 93: 104516, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454378

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this review was to identify pedagogical practices that contribute to professional identity formation in undergraduate nursing education and to map the components of professional identity described within these practices. DESIGN: A scoping review using a six-stage methodological framework was used to capture a range of evidence describing how professional identity has been conceptualized and integrated into nursing curriculum. DATA SOURCES: Databases searched included: Ovid MEDLINE: Epub Ahead of Print, In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE® Daily and Ovid MEDLINE® 1946-Present, EBSCO CINAHL (1981 to present), OVID PsycINFO (1806 to Present), ProQuest ERIC, ASSIA, and Sociological Abstracts. Additional studies were identified by scanning the reference lists of relevant articles. REVIEW METHODS: The study team collaboratively designed the data charting table and two coauthors independently screened the studies using Covidence software. Qualitative content analysis was used to categorize learning outcomes into five components of professional identity that were associated with pedagogical practices identified in the studies. RESULTS: A total of 114 peer-reviewed journal articles were initially charted. Articles were categorized as intervention studies (46, 40%), perspective studies (40, 35%), theoretical papers (17, 15%), or reviews (11, 10%). To ensure feasibility in collating and reporting the results, the review focused on the 46 empirical intervention studies that described associations between pedagogical practices and professional identity formation learning outcomes for students. CONCLUSIONS: This scoping review illustrates the range of contexts in which nursing students learn, the multidimensional nature of identity formation, as well as the breadth of pedagogical practices and learning outcomes that guide course design. The results can be used to inform future curriculum planning and to identify focused research questions to extend our understanding of evidence-based teaching practices supporting professional identity formation.


Subject(s)
Learning , Nurse's Role , Professionalism , Students, Nursing/psychology , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Humans
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444209

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate nursing professionalism as a mediating factor in the relationship between resilience and job stress levels for nurses working in long-term care hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted from January to March 2021 in seven long-term care hospitals in the Seoul metropolitan area to measure resilience, nursing professionalism, and job stress among nurses. Simple and multiple regression analyses along with the Sobel test were performed to verify the mediating effect of nursing professionalism. RESULTS: Data from 200 nurses were included in the final analysis. Results showed that individual and occupational characteristics could lead to differences in nurses' resilience, job stress levels, and nursing professionalism. Nursing professionalism had a significant mediating effect on the relationship between resilience and job stress levels. The effect of resilience on job stress levels was significant (ß = -0.16, p = 0.024). After controlling for nursing professionalism, the effect declined and was not statistically significant (ß = -0.09, p = 0.251). CONCLUSION: There is a need to increase individual resilience and nursing professionalism through intervention programs and policy proposals to manage job stress among long-term care hospital nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Occupational Stress , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Long-Term Care , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Professionalism , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Health Soc Behav ; 62(3): 255-270, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409985

ABSTRACT

From 1940 to 1980, studies of medical education were foundational to sociology, but attention shifted away from medical training in the late 1980s. Recently, there has been a marked return to this once pivotal topic, reflecting new questions and stakes. This article traces this resurgence by reviewing recent substantive research trends and setting the agenda for future research. We summarize four current research foci that reflect and critically map onto earlier projects in this subfield while driving theoretical development elsewhere in the larger discipline: (1) professional socialization, (2) knowledge regimes, (3) stratification within the profession, and (4) sociology of the field of medical education. We then offer six potential future directions where more research is needed: (1) inequalities in medical education, (2) socialization across the life course and new institutional forms of gatekeeping, (3) provider well-being, (4) globalization, (5) medical education as knowledge-based work, and (6) effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Sociology , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Forecasting , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , Models, Educational , Professionalism , Racism , Sexism , Socioeconomic Factors , Sociology/history , Sociology/methods , Sociology/trends
15.
Andes Pediatr ; 92(4): 503-510, 2021 Aug.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404368

ABSTRACT

Professionalism is a well-defined competence in the education of residents. However, it is a complex construct, sensitive to social and cultural variables. It can be defined as the necessary skill, good jud gment and appropriate behavior expected of people trained to do their jobs well. It is a competence that does not remain stable over time and declines when the professional is subjected to high levels of stress, associated with quality of care, education, ethics, moral, philosophy and humanism. It is an essential competence for the professional and therefore we must rethink the curricula to include ways to teach and evaluate professionalism. It is essential to design programs that balance the workload with the well-being of future professionals. We must generate an adequate learning environment where the trainee is an active protagonist, and self-care is made visible as an essential competence to maintain the balance between personal and professional life. This article presents a review and reflects on this topic which is becoming increasingly important in the postgraduate training of future specialists.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Internship and Residency , Professionalism , Humans , Professional Competence , Self Care , Work-Life Balance
18.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2120642, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355859

ABSTRACT

Importance: As medical faculty have central roles during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to study the pandemic's association with the vitality and careers of medical school faculty. Objective: To examine how the COVID-19 pandemic affected midcareer research faculty in academic medicine. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study included medical school faculty who participated in the C-Change Mentoring and Leadership Institute. All US medical school faculty recipients of recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) RO1, RO1-equivalent, and K awards were invited to apply to the institute. The 99 applicants who met inclusion criteria were stratified by degree (MD or MD/PhD vs PhD), gender, and race/ethnicity. Enrollment was offered to applicants randomly selected for 40 spots, demographically balanced by sex, underrepresented in medicine minority (URMM) status, and degree. In April 2020, an inquiry was emailed to faculty enrolled in the institute requesting responses to questions about meaning in work, career choice, and values. A qualitative analysis of narrative data responses, using grounded theory, was undertaken to determine key themes. This study is part of a NIH-funded randomized trial to test the efficacy of a group peer mentoring course for midcareer faculty and study the course's mechanisms of action. Main Outcomes and Measures: Key themes in data. Results: Of 40 enrolled participants, 39 responded to the inquiry, for a response rate of 97%. The analytic sample included 39 faculty members; 19 (47%) were women, 20 (53%) identified as URMM, and 20 (53%) had an MD or MD with PhD vs 19 (47%) with PhD degrees. Key themes in the data that emerged describing faculty lived experience of the pandemic included increased meaningfulness of work; professionalism and moral responsibility; enhanced relationships with colleagues; reassertion of career choice; disrupted research; impact on clinical work; attention to health disparities, social justice and advocacy; increased family responsibilities; psychological stress; and focus on leadership. Conclusions and Relevance: During the pandemic, diverse PhD and physician investigators reported increased meaningfulness in work and professionalism and enhanced relationships, all intrinsic motivators associated with vitality. Working during the pandemic appears to have produced intrinsic rewards positively associated with vitality, in addition to adverse mental health effects. These findings have implications for combatting burnout and retaining investigators in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Professionalism , Research Personnel/psychology , Adult , Career Choice , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
20.
Rev Clin Esp (Barc) ; 221(8): 494-495, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294167
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