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1.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol ; 16(11): 1755-1765, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526737

ABSTRACT

Despite evidence of multiorgan tropism of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), direct viral kidney invasion has been difficult to demonstrate. The question of whether SARS-CoV2 can directly infect the kidney is relevant to the understanding of pathogenesis of AKI and collapsing glomerulopathy in patients with COVID-19. Methodologies to document SARS-CoV-2 infection that have been used include immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and electron microscopy. In our review of studies to date, we found that SARS-CoV-2 in the kidneys of patients with COVID-19 was detected in 18 of 94 (19%) by immunohistochemistry, 71 of 144 (49%) by RT-PCR, and 11 of 84 (13%) by in situ hybridization. In a smaller number of patients with COVID-19 examined by immunofluorescence, SARS-CoV-2 was detected in 10 of 13 (77%). In total, in kidneys from 102 of 235 patients (43%), the presence of SARS-CoV-2 was suggested by at least one of the methods used. Despite these positive findings, caution is needed because many other studies have been negative for SARS-CoV-2 and it should be noted that when detected, it was only in kidneys obtained at autopsy. There is a clear need for studies from kidney biopsies, including those performed at early stages of the COVID-19-associated kidney disease. Development of tests to detect kidney viral infection in urine samples would be more practical as a noninvasive way to evaluate SARS-CoV-2 infection during the evolution of COVID-19-associated kidney disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Kidney Diseases/virology , Kidney/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , Biopsy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19 Testing , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Kidney Diseases/diagnosis , Kidney Diseases/mortality , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
2.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(1): 20-31, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526974

ABSTRACT

The current severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a global infection, and is seriously threatening human life, especially cancer patients. Thus, we sought to determine the clinical roles of ACE2 (the cell entry receptor of SARS-CoV-2) in ccRCC (clear cell renal cell carcinoma). TCGA, GEO and TIP datasets, and immunohistochemistry and western blot results were used to determine the prognostic and clinicopathological characteristics of ACE2. ACE2 expression was down-regulated in ccRCC tissues and cell lines. The multivariate Cox regression analysis results indicated that increased ACE2 expression was independent predictor of longer OS (HR: 0.8259, 95%CI: 0.7734-0.8819, P<0.0001) and RFS (HR: 0.8023, 95%CI: 0.7375-0.8729, P<0.0001) in ccRCC patients. Lower ACE2 expression was also associated with advanced tumor stage, higher histological grade and pathological stage, and metastasis. Besides, ACE2 expression was significantly positively and negatively correlated with CD4 Naïve infiltration and CD4 Memory infiltration, respectively. Moreover, higher CD4 Naïve and lower CD4 Memory infiltration levels were associated with better pathological features and longer OS and RFS. Furthermore, high ACE2 expression group in decreased CD4 Naïve, enriched CD4 Naïve and enriched CD4 memory cohort had favorable prognosis. These findings identified that AEC2 was significantly reduced in ccRCC, and decreased ACE2 was related to worse pathological features and poor prognosis. Low ACE2 expression in ccRCC may partially affect the prognosis due to altered immune cells infiltration levels.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/metabolism , Kidney Neoplasms/metabolism , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/immunology , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/immunology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
3.
mSphere ; 6(5): e0075221, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526451

ABSTRACT

During the progression of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), immune response and inflammation reactions are dynamic events that develop rapidly and are associated with the severity of disease. Here, we aimed to develop a predictive model based on the immune and inflammatory response to discriminate patients with severe COVID-19. COVID-19 patients were enrolled, and their demographic and immune inflammatory reaction indicators were collected and analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the independent predictors, which were further used to construct a predictive model. The predictive performance of the model was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curve, and optimal diagnostic threshold was calculated; these were further validated by 5-fold cross-validation and external validation. We screened three key indicators, including neutrophils, eosinophils, and IgA, for predicting severe COVID-19 and obtained a combined neutrophil, eosinophil, and IgA ratio (NEAR) model (NEU [109/liter] - 150×EOS [109/liter] + 3×IgA [g/liter]). NEAR achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.961, and when a threshold of 9 was applied, the sensitivity and specificity of the predicting model were 100% and 88.89%, respectively. Thus, NEAR is an effective index for predicting the severity of COVID-19 and can be used as a powerful tool for clinicians to make better clinical decisions. IMPORTANCE The immune inflammatory response changes rapidly with the progression of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and is responsible for clearance of the virus and further recovery from the infection. However, the intensified immune and inflammatory response in the development of the disease may lead to more serious and fatal consequences, which indicates that immune indicators have the potential to predict serious cases. Here, we identified both eosinophils and serum IgA as prognostic markers of COVID-19, which sheds light on new research directions and is worthy of further research in the scientific research field as well as clinical application. In this study, the combination of NEU count, EOS count, and IgA level was included in a new predictive model of the severity of COVID-19, which can be used as a powerful tool for better clinical decision-making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Clinical Decision Rules , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Disease Progression , Eosinophils/metabolism , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/virology , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/metabolism , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Sensitivity and Specificity
4.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis ; 32(8): 544-549, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526211

ABSTRACT

Standard biomarkers have been widely used for COVID-19 diagnosis and prognosis. We hypothesize that thrombogenicity metrics measured by thromboelastography will provide better diagnostic and prognostic utility versus standard biomarkers in COVID-19 positive patients. In this observational prospective study, we included 119 hospitalized COVID-19 positive patients and 15 COVID-19 negative patients. On admission, we measured standard biomarkers and thrombogenicity using a novel thromboelastography assay (TEG-6s). In-hospital all-cause death and thrombotic occurrences (thromboembolism, myocardial infarction and stroke) were recorded. Most COVID-19 patients were African--Americans (68%). COVID-19 patients versus COVID-19 negative patients had higher platelet-fibrin clot strength (P-FCS), fibrin clot strength (FCS) and functional fibrinogen level (FLEV) (P ≤ 0.003 for all). The presence of high TEG-6 s metrics better discriminated COVID-19 positive from negative patients. COVID-19 positive patients with sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score at least 3 had higher P-FCS, FCS and FLEV than patients with scores less than 3 (P ≤ 0.001 for all comparisons). By multivariate analysis, the in-hospital composite endpoint occurrence of death and thrombotic events was independently associated with SOFA score more than 3 [odds ratio (OR) = 2.9, P = 0.03], diabetes (OR = 3.3, P = 0.02) and FCS > 40 mm (OR = 3.4, P = 0.02). This largest observational study suggested the early diagnostic and prognostic utility of thromboelastography to identify COVID-19 and should be considered hypothesis generating. Our results also support the recent FDA guidance regarding the importance of measurement of whole blood viscoelastic properties in COVID-19 patients. Our findings are consistent with the observation of higher hospitalization rates and poorer outcomes for African--Americans with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Early Diagnosis , European Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data , Female , Fibrin/analysis , Fibrin Clot Lysis Time , Fibrinogen/analysis , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperlipidemias/epidemiology , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology , Treatment Outcome
5.
Lab Med ; 52(5): 493-498, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526169

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the role of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We included 110 patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Biochemical biomarkers, including MR-proADM, were measured at admission. The association of plasma MR-proADM levels with COVID-19 severity, defined as a requirement for mechanical ventilation or in-hospital mortality, was evaluated. RESULTS: Patients showed increased levels of MR-proADM. In addition, MR-proADM was higher in patients who died during hospitalization than in patients who survived (median, 2.59 nmol/L; interquartile range, 2.3-2.95 vs median, 0.82 nmol/L; interquartile range, 0.57-1.03; P <.0001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed good accuracy of MR-proADM for predicting mortality. A MR-proADM value of 1.73 nmol/L was established as the best cutoff value, with 90% sensitivity and 95% specificity (P <.0001). CONCLUSION: We found that MR-proADM could represent a prognostic biomarker of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adrenomedullin/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hypertension/diagnosis , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Protein Precursors/blood , Aged , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Hypertension/blood , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/virology , Interleukin-6/blood , Lung Diseases/blood , Lung Diseases/mortality , Lung Diseases/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Selection , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Triage/methods
6.
Cardiovasc Res ; 117(9): 2045-2053, 2021 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526155

ABSTRACT

Although coronavirus disease 2019 seems to be the leading topic in research number of outstanding studies have been published in the field of aorta and peripheral vascular diseases likely affecting our clinical practice in the near future. This review article highlights key research on vascular diseases published in 2020. Some studies have shed light in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm and dissection suggesting a potential role for kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic options. A first proteogenomic study on fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) revealed a promising novel disease gene and provided proof-of-concept for a protein/lipid-based FMD blood test. The role of NADPH oxidases in vascular physiology, and particularly endothelial cell differentiation, is highlighted with potential for cell therapy development. Imaging of vulnerable plaque has been an intense field of research. Features of plaque vulnerability on magnetic resonance imaging as an under-recognized cause of stroke are discussed. Major clinical trials on lower extremity peripheral artery disease have shown added benefit of dual antithrombotic (aspirin plus rivaroxaban) treatment.


Subject(s)
Aortic Diseases , Biomedical Research/trends , Peripheral Vascular Diseases , Animals , Aortic Diseases/diagnosis , Aortic Diseases/epidemiology , Aortic Diseases/genetics , Aortic Diseases/therapy , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/diagnosis , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/epidemiology , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/genetics , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/therapy , Prognosis
7.
Int Heart J ; 62(5): 1083-1090, 2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523485

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular diseases can affect the clinical course of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19); however, evaluation of COVID-19 contribution to prognosis for each individual disease, such as heart failure, is lacking in South Korea. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate COVID-19 patients with heart failure by matching them with patients with heart failure only and those with COVID-19 only. We performed a nationwide population-based retrospective study using data from the National Health Insurance System. Based on patients with heart failure and COVID-19, up to 1:3 propensity score matching procedures were performed for patients with heart failure only and those with COVID-19 only. The outcome was the composite of complications. After matching, a multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression analysis was performed. The number of patients was 317 for heart failure and COVID-19, 951 for heart failure only, and 884 for COVID-19 only. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the composite of complications of patients with heart failure and COVID-19 compared with those with heart failure only was 3.511 (2.501-4.928), and compared with those with COVID-19 only, they were 1.626 (1.112-2.376). In patients with heart failure and COVID-19, age per 10 years increase and diabetes were significant variables with the adjusted OR (95% CI) [2.206 (1.704-2.856) for age and 2.345 (1.244-4.420) for diabetes] for complications. This study demonstrated that patients with both heart failure and COVID-19 in South Korea are associated with a poor prognosis. Patients with heart failure require more surveillance and precautions for COVID-19, as recommended by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Heart Failure/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Republic of Korea , Retrospective Studies
8.
Int J Lab Hematol ; 43 Suppl 1: 137-141, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526369

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Eosinopenia has been observed during infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of COVID-19. This study evaluated the role of eosinopenia as a diagnostic and prognostic indicator in COVID-19 infection. METHODS: Information on 429 patients with confirmed COVID-19, admitted to Apollo Hospitals, Chennai, India between 04 June 2020 to 15 August 2020, was retrospectively collected through electronic records and analysed. RESULTS: 79.25% of the patients included in the study had eosinopenia on admission. The median eosinophil count in COVID-19-positive patients was 0.015 × 109 /L, and in negative patients, it was 0.249 × 109 /L. Eighteen per cent of the positive patients presented with 0 eosinophil count. Eosinopenia for early diagnosis of COVID-19 had a sensitivity of 80.68% and specificity of 100% with an accuracy of 85.24. Role of eosinopenia in prognostication of COVID-19 was found to be insignificant. There was no statistically significant difference between the median eosinophil counts in survivors and nonsurvivors. Eosinophil trends during the course of disease were found to be similar between survivors and nonsurvivors. CONCLUSIONS: Eosinopenia on admission is a reliable and convenient early diagnostic marker for COVID-19 infection, helping in early identification, triaging and isolation of the patients till nucleic acid test results are available. Role of eosinopenia as a prognostic indicator is insignificant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/blood , Eosinophils , Leukocyte Count , Leukopenia/etiology , Area Under Curve , Biomarkers , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Eosinophilia/blood , Eosinophilia/etiology , Humans , India , Leukopenia/blood , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Selection Bias , Sensitivity and Specificity , Survival Analysis
10.
Front Public Health ; 9: 726491, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518568

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The roles of some indicators in the prognosis of patients with coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) remain unclear and controversial. This study aimed to explore the epidemiologic characteristics of and prognostic factors for COVID-19 to provide updated recommendations for its prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods: For this retrospective study, demographic, epidemiologic, and clinical data were extracted from the medical records of patients admitted to the Maternal and Child Hospital of Hubei Province (Optical Valley) with COVID-19 between February 19, 2020, and March 19, 2020. The primary outcome was the prognosis that was determined at discharge as mentioned in the medical records. Descriptive statistics, univariate analyses, and stepwise logistic regression analysis were used for data analysis. Results: Of the 1,765 patients included, 93.1% were cured and the mortality was 1.8%. Univariate analyses identified 63 factors significantly associated with COVID-19 prognosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that a poorer prognosis was associated with undergoing resuscitation, complex disease manifestations, consultation with outside specialists, elevated basophil or lymphocyte counts, an albumin (ALB)/globulin (A/G) ratio > 2.4, and elevated levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) or creatinine. Patients had a better prognosis if the following conditions were met: dry cough reported as an initial symptom, fatigue as a clinical manifestation, and a diagnosis based on laboratory testing. Conclusion: To prevent clinical deterioration, clinicians should provide special care to patients who underwent resuscitation, with a critical disease, or requiring consultation with outside specialists. Extra attention should be paid to patients with high basophil or lymphocyte counts, a high A/G ratio, and elevated AST or creatinine levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Cough , Humans , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Kardiologiia ; 61(10): 26-35, 2021 Oct 30.
Article in English, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515680

ABSTRACT

Background     Heart damage is one of complications of the novel coronavirus infection. Searching for available predictors for in-hospital death and survival that determine the tactic of managing patients with COVID-19, is a challenge of the present time.Aim      To determine the role echocardiographic (EchoCG) parameters in evaluation of the in-hospital prognosis for patients with the novel coronavirus infection, COVID-19.Material and methods  The study included 158 patients admitted for COVID-19. EchoCG was performed for all patients. The role of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) was analyzed in various age groups. EchoCG data were compared with the clinical picture, including the severity of respiratory failure (RF), blood oxygen saturation (SрО2), data of computed tomography (CT) of the lungs, and blood concentration of troponin. Comorbidity was analyzed, and the highest significance of individual pathologies was determined.Results LV EF ≤40 % determined the worst prognosis of patients with COVID-19 (p<0.0001), including the age group older than 70 years (р=0.013). LV EF did not correlate with the degree of lung tissue damage determined by CT upon admission (р=0.54) and over time (р=0.23). The indexes that determined an adverse in-hospital prognosis to a considerable degree were pericardial effusion (p<0.0001) and pulmonary hypertension (p<0.0001). RV end-diastolic dimension and LV end-diastolic volume did not determine the in-hospital mortality and survival. Blood serum concentration of troponin I higher than 165.13 µg/l was an important predictor for in-hospital death with a high degree of significance (р<0.0001). Th degree of RF considerably influenced the in-hospital mortality (р<0.0001). RF severity was associated with LV EF (р=0.024). The SpO2 value determined an adverse immediate prognosis with a high degree of significance (р=0.0009). This parameter weakly correlated with LV EF (r=0.26; p=0.0009). Patients who required artificial ventilation (AV) constituted a group with the worst survival rate (р<0.0001). LV EF was associated with a need for AV with a high degree of significance (р=0.0006). Comorbidities, such as chronic kidney disease, postinfarction cardiosclerosis and oncologic diseases, to the greatest extent determined the risk of fatal outcome.Conclusion      EchoCG can be recommended for patients with COVID-19 at the hospital stage to determine the tactics of management and for the in-hospital prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular System , Aged , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21923, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510619

ABSTRACT

We developed a tool to guide decision-making for early triage of COVID-19 patients based on a predicted prognosis, using a Korean national cohort of 5,596 patients, and validated the developed tool with an external cohort of 445 patients treated in a single institution. Predictors chosen for our model were older age, male sex, subjective fever, dyspnea, altered consciousness, temperature ≥ 37.5 °C, heart rate ≥ 100 bpm, systolic blood pressure ≥ 160 mmHg, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, chronic kidney disease, cancer, dementia, anemia, leukocytosis, lymphocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. In the external validation, when age, sex, symptoms, and underlying disease were used as predictors, the AUC used as an evaluation metric for our model's performance was 0.850 in predicting whether a patient will require at least oxygen therapy and 0.833 in predicting whether a patient will need critical care or die from COVID-19. The AUCs improved to 0.871 and 0.864, respectively, when additional information on vital signs and blood test results were also used. In contrast, the protocols currently recommended in Korea showed AUCs less than 0.75. An application for calculating the prognostic score in COVID-19 patients based on the results of this study is presented on our website ( https://nhimc.shinyapps.io/ih-psc/ ), where the results of the validation ongoing in our institution are periodically updated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Triage
14.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 370-376, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513257

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) diagnostic and prognostic value in the context of Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) infection in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A case-control study in which 701 confirmed COVID-19 patients (of which 41 were intensive care unit [ICU]-admitted) and 250 control subjects were enrolled. The study was conducted retrospectively in October on patients admitted to 3 separate hospitals in Saudi Arabia namely: King Abdullah Bin Abdulaziz University Hospital (Riyadh), Ohud Hospital (Madinah), and Nojood Medical Center (Madinah) between May and September 2020. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was calculated based on absolute neutrophil and lymphocyte count. Institutional ethical approval was obtained prior to the study. RESULTS: Patients (median age 35 years), of which 54.8% were females, were younger than the control cohort (median age 48 years). Patients had significantly higher NLR compared to the control group. Intensive care unit admitted patients had significantly higher platelet, WBC and neutrophil counts. The ICU patients' NLR was almost twice as of the non-intensive patients. The NLR value of 5.5 was found to be of high specificity (96.4%) and positive predictive value (91.4%) in diagnosing COVID-19. Furthermore, it had a very good sensitivity (86.4%) in predicting severe forms of disease, such as, ICU admission. CONCLUSION: Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is an important tool in determining the COVID-19 clinical status. This study further confirms the prognostic value of NLR in detecting severe infection, and those patients with high NLR should be closely monitored and managed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Lymphocyte Count , Neutrophils , Adult , Blood Cell Count , COVID-19/blood , Case-Control Studies , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index
15.
QJM ; 114(7): 447-453, 2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506797

ABSTRACT

We aim to study the relationship between vitamin D level, risk and severity of Coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) infection in pediatric population through systematic review. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar from December 2019 to June 2021 for retrieving articles studying association between vitamin D deficiencies with COVID-19. Qualitative details were synthesized in evidence table and quantitative data was used for deriving pooled estimate through meta-analysis. After initial search of 2261 articles, eight eligible studies (two reviews) were included in the systematic review. Meta-analysis of the quantitative data (six studies) showed pooled prevalence of vitamin D deficiency as 45.91% (95% CI: 25.148-67.450). In infected pediatric patients, low levels of vitamin D increased the risk of severe disease (odds ratio-5.5; 95% CI: 1.560-19.515; P = 0.008). It was also found that children and adolescents having vitamin D deficiency had greater risk of COVID infection as compared to patients with normal vitamin D levels. Improvement in disease severity with vitamin D supplementation was also noted. The systematic review showed that almost half of the pediatric COVID patients suffer from vitamin D deficiency. It is also clear that the low level of vitamin D is associated with greater risk of infection and poorer outcome in pediatrics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatrics , Vitamin D Deficiency , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology
16.
Med Oncol ; 39(1): 6, 2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506526

ABSTRACT

To assess the prognostic role of different inflammatory indices on the outcome of cancer patients with COVID-19. Sixty-two adults and 22 pediatric cancer patients with COVID-19 infection were assessed for the prognostic value of certain inflammatory indices including the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), monocyte to lymphocyte ratio (MLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR), derived NLR (dNLR), systemic inflammation index (SII), mean platelet volume to platelet ratio (MPR), C-reactive protein to lymphocyte ratio (CRP/L), aggregate index of systemic inflammation (AISI), systemic inflammation response index (SIRI), and neutrophil to lymphocyte, platelet ratio (NLPR). Data were correlated to patients' outcome regarding ICU admission, and incidence of mortality. Increased CRP/L ratio in adult COVID-19 cancer patients was significantly associated with inferior survival [152 (19-2253) in non-survivors, compared to 27.4 (0.8-681) in survivors (P = 0.033)]. It achieved a sensitivity (60%) and a specificity (90.2%) at a cut-off 152, while it achieved a sensitivity of 60% and specificity 95.1% at a cut-off 252 (AUC 0.795, P = 0.033). When combining both CRP/L and NLPR for the prediction of poor outcome in adult cancer patients with COVID19, the sensitivity increased to 80% and the specificity was 70.7% (AUC 0.805, P = 0.027). Increased incidence of ICU admission in pediatric cancer patients associated significantly with the severity of covid19 infection, decreased mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) < 28.3, increased red cell distribution width (RDW) > 16, lymphopenia < 1.04, pseudo Pelger-Huet appearance, and PLR < 196.4 (P = 0.004, P = 0.040, P = 0.029, P = 0. 0.039, P = 0.050, and P = 0.040; respectively). The mean corpuscular volume (MCV), MCH, and RDW could be useful prognostic markers for poor outcome in COVID-19 pediatric cancer patients (P < 0.05 for all). Increased both CRP/L and NLPR associated significantly with poor survival in adult COVID-19 cancer patients, while PLR associated significantly with ICU admission in pediatric COVID-19 cancer patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Inflammation/pathology , Neoplasms/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Blood Platelets/pathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Leukocyte Count/methods , Lymphocytes/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/virology , Neutrophils/pathology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
17.
Acta Biomed ; 92(5): e2021474, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504914

ABSTRACT

Hyponatraemia is frequently encountered in adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is associated with poor prognosis. This review aims to describe for the first time the prevalence, aetiology, prognostic value, pathophysiology, and management of hyponatraemia in children and adolescents with COVID-19, taking into account all relevant studies published in PubMed and Cochrane Library studies until 26th September 2021. Literature search did not detect any studies evaluating the prevalence and prognostic value of sodium disorders in paediatric patients with COVID-19. A broader literature review showed a high prevalence of hyponatraemia in children with bacterial pneumonia, while some studies have reported that hyponatraemia is relatively common in Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). In adults with COVID-19, an inverse association between sodium and interleukin-6 levels has been found, indicating that hyponatraemia could be used as a surrogate marker for the risk of cytokine storm and may facilitate the identification of patients who could benefit from immunomodulatory agents. Studies are urgently needed to evaluate the frequency and prognostic impact of electrolyte abnormalities in children with COVID-19. In the meantime, clinicians are urged to consider hyponatraemia in children with COVID-19 as a potential red flag, investigate the cause and administer fluids and other therapies accordingly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyponatremia , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Humans , Hyponatremia/epidemiology , Hyponatremia/etiology , Hyponatremia/therapy , Prevalence , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 732913, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504188

ABSTRACT

Obesity prevails worldwide to an increasing effect. For example, up to 42% of American adults are considered obese. Obese individuals are prone to a variety of complications of metabolic disorders including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Recent meta-analyses of clinical studies in patient cohorts in the ongoing coronavirus-disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic indicate that the presence of obesity and relevant disorders is linked to a more severe prognosis of COVID-19. Given the significance of obesity in COVID-19 progression, we provide a review of host metabolic and immune responses in the immunometabolic dysregulation exaggerated by obesity and the viral infection that develops into a severe course of COVID-19. Moreover, sequela studies of individuals 6 months after having COVID-19 show a higher risk of metabolic comorbidities including obesity, diabetes, and kidney disease. These collectively implicate an inter-systemic dimension to understanding the association between obesity and COVID-19 and suggest an interdisciplinary intervention for relief of obesity-COVID-19 complications beyond the phase of acute infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Obesity/immunology , Obesity/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , Disease Progression , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity , Metabolic Diseases/immunology , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Obesity/complications , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
19.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21633, 2021 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503836

ABSTRACT

Although the serum lipidome is markedly affected by COVID-19, two unresolved issues remain: how the severity of the disease affects the level and the composition of serum lipids and whether serum lipidome analysis may identify specific lipids impairment linked to the patients' outcome. Sera from 49 COVID-19 patients were analyzed by untargeted lipidomics. Patients were clustered according to: inflammation (C-reactive protein), hypoxia (Horowitz Index), coagulation state (D-dimer), kidney function (creatinine) and age. COVID-19 patients exhibited remarkable and distinctive dyslipidemia for each prognostic factor associated with reduced defense against oxidative stress. When patients were clustered by outcome (7 days), a peculiar lipidome signature was detected with an overall increase of 29 lipid species, including-among others-four ceramide and three sulfatide species, univocally related to this analysis. Considering the lipids that were affected by all the prognostic factors, we found one sphingomyelin related to inflammation and viral infection of the respiratory tract and two sphingomyelins, that are independently related to patients' age, and they appear as candidate biomarkers to monitor disease progression and severity. Although preliminary and needing validation, this report pioneers the translation of lipidome signatures to link the effects of five critical clinical prognostic factors with the patients' outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Lipids/blood , Serum/chemistry , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Dyslipidemias/metabolism , Female , Humans , Italy , Lipidomics/methods , Lipids/analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sphingomyelins/blood
20.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 20(1): 218, 2021 11 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503722

ABSTRACT

Type 2 diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors for heart failure, the prevalence of which is increasing worldwide. The aim of the review is to highlight the current perspectives of the pathophysiology of heart failure as it pertains to type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the proposed mechanistic bases, explaining the myocardial damage induced by diabetes-related stressors and other risk factors, i.e., cardiomyopathy in type 2 diabetes. We highlight the complex pathology of individuals with type 2 diabetes, including the relationship with chronic kidney disease, metabolic alterations, and heart failure. We also discuss the current criteria used for heart failure diagnosis and the gold standard screening tools for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Currently approved pharmacological therapies with primary use in type 2 diabetes and heart failure, and the treatment-guiding role of NT-proBNP are also presented. Finally, the influence of the presence of type 2 diabetes as well as heart failure on COVID-19 severity is briefly discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Disease Management , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Mass Screening/methods , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Heart Failure/blood , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Humans , Mass Screening/trends , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Peptide Fragments/blood , Prognosis
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