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1.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 152: w30212, 2022 08 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2202462

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: Awake prone positioning (aPP) in non-intubated patients with severe SARS-CoV-2-related pneumonia improves oxygenation and reduces the intubation rate, but no early predictors for success or failure of the strategy have been described. The main objective of this study was to assess whether response to the first aPP in terms of PaO2/FiO2, alveolar-arterial gradient (Aa-O2), respiratory rate and PaCO2 could predict the need for intubation. As secondary objective, we assessed the effects of aPP on the same parameters for all the sessions considered together. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of consecutive SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia patients suffering from acute respiratory failure with moderate to severe hypoxaemia for whom aPP was performed for at least 45 minutes based on the prescription of the clinician in charge according to predefined criteria. Respiratory rate, blood gases and oxygenation parameters (PaO2/FiO2 and Aa-O2), before and after the first aPP were compared between patients who were subsequently intubated or not. Effects of all the aPP sessions together were also analysed. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-six patients were admitted for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia during the study period. Among them, 50 received aPP lasting at least 45 minutes. Because 17 denied consent for data analysis and 2 were excluded because of a "do not intubate order", 31 patients (for a total of 116 aPP sessions without any severe adverse events reported) were included. Among them, 10 (32.3%) were intubated. Mean age ± standard deviation (SD) was 60 ± 12 years. At ICU admission, respiratory rate was 26 ± 7/minute, median PaO2/FiO2 94 (interquartile range [IQR] 74-116) mm Hg and median Aa-O2 412 (IQR 286-427) mm Hg (markedly increased). Baseline characteristics did not statistically differ between patients who subsequently needed intubation or not. During the first aPP, PaO2/FiO2 increased and Aa-O2 decreased. When comparing patients who later where intubated or not, we observed, in the non intubated group only, a clinically significant decrease in median Aa-O2, from 294 (280-414) to 204 (107-281) mm Hg, corresponding to a 40% (26-56%) reduction, and a PaO2/FiO2 increase, from 103 (84-116) to 162 (138-195), corresponding to an increase of 48% (11-93%). The p value is <0.005 for both. When all the aPP sessions (n = 80) were considered together, aPP was associated with a significant increase in PaO2/FiO2 from 112 (80-132) to 156 (86-183) mm Hg (p <0.001) and Aa-O2 decrease from 304 (244-418) to 224 (148-361) mm Hg (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Awake pronation in spontaneously breathing patients is feasible, and improves PaO2/FiO2 and Aa-O2. Response to the first session seems to be associated with lower intubation rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Respiratory Insufficiency , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Hypoxia/complications , Hypoxia/therapy , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects , Prone Position , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Wakefulness
3.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 154, 2022 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866391

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The physiological effects of prone ventilation in ARDS patients have been discussed for a long time but have not been fully elucidated. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has emerged as a tool for bedside monitoring of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, allowing the opportunity to obtain data. This study aimed to investigate the effect of prone positioning (PP) on ventilation-perfusion matching by contrast-enhanced EIT in patients with ARDS. DESIGN: Monocenter prospective physiologic study. SETTING: University medical ICU. PATIENTS: Ten mechanically ventilated ARDS patients who underwent PP. INTERVENTIONS: We performed EIT evaluation at the initiation of PP, 3 h after PP initiation and the end of PP during the first PP session. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The regional distribution of ventilation and perfusion was analyzed based on EIT images and compared to the clinical variables regarding respiratory and hemodynamic status. Prolonged prone ventilation improved oxygenation in the ARDS patients. Based on EIT measurements, the distribution of ventilation was homogenized and dorsal lung ventilation was significantly improved by PP administration, while the effect of PP on lung perfusion was relatively mild, with increased dorsal lung perfusion observed. The ventilation-perfusion matched region was found to increase and correlate with the increased PaO2/FiO2 by PP, which was attributed mainly to reduced shunt in the lung. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged prone ventilation increased dorsal ventilation and perfusion, which resulted in improved ventilation-perfusion matching and oxygenation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04725227. Registered on 25 January 2021.


Subject(s)
Lung , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Electric Impedance , Humans , Perfusion , Prone Position , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
5.
Respir Res ; 23(1): 320, 2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139301

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has specific characteristics compared to ARDS in other populations. Proning is recommended by analogy with other forms of ARDS, but few data are available regarding its physiological effects in this population. This study aimed to assess the effects of proning on oxygenation parameters (PaO2/FiO2 and alveolo-arterial gradient (Aa-gradient)), blood gas analysis, ventilatory ratio (VR), respiratory system compliance (CRS) and estimated dead space fraction (VD/VT HB). We also looked for variables associated with treatment failure. METHODS: Retrospective monocentric study of intubated COVID-19 ARDS patients managed with an early intubation, low to moderate positive end-expiratory pressure and early proning strategy hospitalized from March 6 to April 30 2020. Blood gas analysis, PaO2/FiO2, Aa-gradient, VR, CRS and VD/VT HB were compared before and at the end of each proning session with paired t-tests or Wilcoxon tests (p < 0.05 considered as significant). Proportions were assessed using Fischer exact test or Chi square test. RESULTS: Forty-two patients were included for a total of 191 proning sessions, median duration of 16 (5-36) hours. Considering all sessions, PaO2/FiO2 increased (180 [148-210] vs 107 [90-129] mmHg, p < 0.001) and Aa-gradient decreased (127 [92-176] vs 275 [211-334] mmHg, p < 0.001) with proning. CRS (36.2 [30.0-41.8] vs 32.2 [27.5-40.9] ml/cmH2O, p = 0.003), VR (2.4 [2.0-2.9] vs 2.3 [1.9-2.8], p = 0.028) and VD/VT HB (0.72 [0.67-0.76] vs 0.71 [0.65-0.76], p = 0.022) slightly increased. Considering the first proning session, PaO2/FiO2 increased (186 [165-215] vs 104 [94-126] mmHg, p < 0.001) and Aa-gradient decreased (121 [89-160] vs 276 [238-321] mmHg, p < 0.001), while CRS, VR and VD/VT HB were unchanged. Similar variations were observed during the subsequent proning sessions. Among the patients who experienced treatment failure (defined as ICU death or need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), fewer expressed a positive response in terms of oxygenation (defined as increase of more than 20% in PaO2/FiO2) to the first proning (67 vs 97%, p = 0.020). CONCLUSION: Proning in COVID-19 ARDS intubated patients led to an increase in PaO2/FiO2 and a decrease in Aa-gradient if we consider all the sessions together, the first one or the 4 subsequent sessions independently. When considering all sessions, CRS increased and VR and VD/VT HB only slightly increased.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Adult , Retrospective Studies , Prone Position , Respiration, Artificial , COVID-19/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy
7.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(12): 1793-1795, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2128543
8.
JBJS Case Connect ; 11(1)2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115210

ABSTRACT

CASE: We describe a preliminary report of 3 cases of ulnar neuropathy after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and treatment with intermittent prone positioning. CONCLUSION: Ulnar neuropathy may be associated with recent COVID-19 infection. The natural process of the disease and intermittent prone positioning are likely risk factors contributing to this finding. Conservative management seems to lead to improvement of symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects , Patient Positioning/adverse effects , Prone Position , Ulnar Neuropathies/etiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 19(10): 1634-1635, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054423
14.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 29: e3494, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054554

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to analyze, in the scientific literature, the knowledge available on the use of the prone position in pregnant women diagnosed with COVID-19 or other health conditions. METHOD: an integrative literature review developed through the following guiding question: What is the scientific knowledge available on the use of the prone position in pregnant women with COVID-19 or other health conditions? The search for studies was carried out in eight databases. RESULTS: using the prone position in pregnant women with Acute Respiratory Distress syndrome allowed for improvements in lung compliance and oxygenation. It also allowed reducing uterine compression on the maternal large vessels, and a reduction in blood pressure was observed in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia. The prone position was also safe in the surgical management of pregnant patients. In addition, the following conditions stood out as disadvantages related to the prone position in pregnant women: possibility of aortocaval compression, causing severe hypotension, and inability to easily monitor fetal status or to perform emergency Cesarean sections. CONCLUSION: the prone position was considered safe, reliable and comfortable for its use in the clinical management of pregnant women, where specific care measures must be taken to avoid compression of gravid abdomen, as well as fetal monitoring is important to detect placental circulation impairment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Placenta , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Prone Position , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 16528, 2022 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050546

ABSTRACT

Real-time effects of changing body position and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on regional lung overdistension and collapse in individual patients remain largely unknown and not timely monitored. The aim of this study was to individualize PEEP in supine and prone body positions seeking to reduce lung collapse and overdistension in mechanically ventilated patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that prone positioning with bedside titrated PEEP would provide attenuation of both overdistension and collapse. In this prospective observational study, patients with COVID-19-induced ARDS under mechanical ventilation were included. We used electrical impedance tomography (EIT) with decremental PEEP titration algorithm (PEEPEIT-titration), which provides information on regional lung overdistension and collapse, along with global respiratory system compliance, to individualize PEEP and body position. PEEPEIT-titration in supine position followed by PEEPEIT-titration in prone position were performed. Immediately before each PEEPEIT-titration, the same lung recruitment maneuver was performed: 2 min of PEEP 24 cmH2O and driving pressure of 15 cmH2O. Forty-two PEEPEIT-titration were performed in ten patients (21 pairs supine and prone positions). We have found larger % of overdistension along the PEEP titration in prone than supine position (P = 0.042). A larger % of collapse along the PEEP titration was found in supine than prone position (P = 0.037). A smaller respiratory system compliance was found in prone than supine position (P < 0.0005). In patients with COVID-19-induced ARDS, prone body position, when compared with supine body position, decreased lung collapse at low PEEP levels, but increased lung overdistension at PEEP levels greater than 10 cm H2O.Trial registration number: NCT04460859.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Positive-Pressure Respiration , Pulmonary Atelectasis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Lung/pathology , Prone Position , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy
19.
Prague Med Rep ; 123(3): 140-165, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2030374

ABSTRACT

Before coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged, proning had been demonstrated to improve oxygenation in those with acute hypoxic respiratory failure and be performed in non-intensive care settings. This benefit was further exemplified by the COVID-19 pandemic, leading to awake prone positioning (APP). We assessed the efficacy of routine APP versus standard care in preventing death and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) in non-intubated hypoxic COVID-19 patients. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and medRxiv databases were used from January 1st, 2020, to January 15th, 2022, to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Routine APP group were encouraged to be self-prone, whereas the standard care group received care according to local clinical practice and allowed APP crossover as rescue therapy. We included eight COVID-19 RCTs assessing 809 APP vs. 822 standard care patients. APP group had less IMV requirement (26.5% vs. 30.9%; OR - odds ratio 0.77; P=0.03) than the standard care group, with subgroup analysis showing greater benefit (32.5% vs. 39.1%; OR 0.75; P=0.02) for those mainly requiring oxygen support of non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC). The time to IMV initiation was similar (mean 8.3 vs. 10.0 days; P=0.66) for patients requiring NIMV and HFNC. Patients mainly receiving supplemental oxygen and non-rebreather masks had improved oxygenation parameters, although not statistically significant. Other outcomes involving all-cause hospital mortality, hospital and ICU (intensive care unit) length of stay, and adverse events were comparable. APP appeared to be an important modality for reducing IMV requirements, especially in those requiring NIMV and HFNC.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Oxygen , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/adverse effects , Prone Position , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Wakefulness
20.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 277, 2022 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029725

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent reports of patients with severe, late-stage COVID-19 ARDS with reduced respiratory system compliance described paradoxical decreases in plateau pressure and increases in respiratory system compliance in response to anterior chest wall loading. We aimed to assess the effect of chest wall loading during supine and prone position in ill patients with COVID-19-related ARDS and to investigate the effect of a low or normal baseline respiratory system compliance on the findings. METHODS: This is a single-center, prospective, cohort study in the intensive care unit of a COVID-19 referral center. Consecutive mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients with COVID-19-related ARDS were enrolled and classified as higher (≥ 40 ml/cmH2O) or lower respiratory system compliance (< 40 ml/cmH2O). The study included four steps, each lasting 6 h: Step 1, supine position, Step 2, 10-kg continuous chest wall compression (supine + weight), Step 3, prone position, Step 4, 10-kg continuous chest wall compression (prone + weight). The mechanical properties of the respiratory system, gas exchange and alveolar dead space were measured at the end of each step. RESULTS: Totally, 40 patients were enrolled. In the whole cohort, neither oxygenation nor respiratory system compliance changed between supine and supine + weight; both increased during prone positioning and were unaffected by chest wall loading in the prone position. Alveolar dead space was unchanged during all the steps. In 16 patients with reduced compliance, PaO2/FiO2 significantly increased from supine to supine + weight and further with prone and prone + weight (107 ± 15.4 vs. 120 ± 18.5 vs. 146 ± 27.0 vs. 159 ± 30.4, respectively; p < 0.001); alveolar dead space decreased from both supine and prone position after chest wall loading, and respiratory system compliance significantly increased from supine to supine + weight and from prone to prone + weight (23.9 ± 3.5 vs. 30.9 ± 5.7 and 31.1 ± 5.7 vs. 37.8 ± 8.7 ml/cmH2O, p < 0.001). The improvement was higher the lower the baseline compliance. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike prone positioning, chest wall loading had no effects on respiratory system compliance, gas exchange or alveolar dead space in an unselected cohort of critically ill patients with C-ARDS. Only patients with a low respiratory system compliance experienced an improvement, with a higher response the lower the baseline compliance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Thoracic Wall , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Prone Position/physiology , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Mechanics/physiology
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