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1.
Can J Urol ; 29(4): 11224-11230, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1989837

ABSTRACT

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening remains the mainstay for early detection of prostate cancer. Although PSA is a nonspecific prostate cancer biomarker, its specificity for high grade prostate cancer can be enhanced by pre-biopsy liquid biomarkers including the Exosome Dx Prostate IntelliScore (EPI) test. EPI is a stand-alone urine genomic test that measures 3 exosome-derived gene expression signatures without the need for digital rectal examination (DRE) or inclusion of standard of care parameters in the test algorithm. EPI has broad clinical utility as a risk stratification tool for clinically significant high grade prostate cancer in men considering diagnostic prostate biopsy (MRI-targeted and systematic biopsy). During the COVID-19 pandemic, the EPI At-Home Collection Kit was introduced and quickly became an important component of tele-urology. The EPI test has emerged as a prioritization tool for primary care referral to urologists and for prostate biopsy scheduling. EPI provides an objective and actionable genomic risk assessment tool for high grade prostate cancer and is a critical part of the informed decision-making regarding biopsy (targeted, systematic or both) in both urology and primary care practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exosomes , Prostatic Neoplasms , Urology , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Biopsy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Exosomes/genetics , Exosomes/pathology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Primary Health Care , Prostate/pathology , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Prostatic Neoplasms/genetics , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology
2.
3.
BMC Urol ; 22(1): 88, 2022 Jun 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962805

ABSTRACT

AIM: The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare in Australia have yet to be fully determined. There are well documented decreases in the rates of screening and diagnostic testing for many cancers in 2020, with commensurate stage migration of cancers when they are eventually detected. We aimed to determine whether there was a decrease in the rate of prostate cancer (PC) screening and testing in Australia in 2020. METHOD: Data was extracted from the Department of Human Services (DHS) website for Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) item numbers for tests pertinent to detection of Prostate Cancer. This data is de-identified and publicly available. Data was analysed at both a national, and a state level. RESULTS: For 2020 nationwide the percentage change for prostate cancer testing was minor with 97% as many PSA tests, 99% as many prostate MRIs, and 105% as many prostate biopsies as the average for the preceding years. The differences were not significant (PSA tests p = 0.059 and prostate biopsies p = 0.109). The predicted values are fairly similar to both the average values for the preceding 5 years and the actual number of tests done in 2020. With exception of PSA tests in Victoria the actual number of tests performed was within the 95% Prediction Interval (performed: 167,426; predicted 171,194-196,699; p = 0.015). CONCLUSION: The current pandemic has had a widespread reach across Australia, with varying impact across each state and territory. Contrary to the trends across the world, our data suggest that during 2020 in Australia most areas remained unaffected in terms of prostate cancer testing excluding Victoria, which had statistically significant decrease in the number of PSA tests correlating with the extended lockdown that occurred in the state.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prostatic Neoplasms , Aged , Communicable Disease Control , Early Detection of Cancer , Humans , Male , National Health Programs , Pandemics , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Victoria
4.
Pharmacoeconomics ; 40(7): 699-714, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1920313

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) imposes a substantial and ongoing burden on the US healthcare system and society. Molnupiravir is a new oral antiviral for treating COVID-19 in outpatient settings. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness profile of molnupiravir versus best supportive care in the treatment of adult patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 at risk of progression to severe disease, from a US payer's perspective. METHODS: The model was developed using a decision tree for the short-term acute phase of COVID-19 and a Markov state transition model for the long-term post-acute phase. This model compared molnupiravir with best supportive care as consistent with the MOVe-OUT trial. Costs were reported in 2021 US dollars. Transition probabilities were derived from the phase III MOVe-OUT trial and the TriNetX real-world electronic health records database. Costs were derived from the TriNetX database and utility values from a de novo, vignette-based utility study. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (DSA/PSA) were conducted. Primary outcomes included proportion hospitalized, proportion who died overall and by highest healthcare setting at the end of the acute phase, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and incremental costs per QALY gained over a lifetime (100 years) horizon, discounted at 3% annually and assessed at a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY. RESULTS: In this model, the use of molnupiravir led to an increase in QALYs (0.210) and decrease in direct total medical costs (-$895) per patient across a lifetime horizon, compared with best supportive care in COVID-19 outpatients. Molnupiravir was the dominant intervention when compared with best supportive care. Patients treated with molnupiravir were less likely to be hospitalized (6.38% vs. 9.20%) and more likely to remain alive (99.88% vs. 98.71%) during the acute phase. Through DSA, molnupiravir treatment effect of hospitalization reduction was identified to be the most influential parameter, and through PSA, molnupiravir remained dominant in 84% of the total simulations and, overall, 100% cost effective. CONCLUSION: This analysis suggests that molnupiravir is cost effective compared with best supportive care for the treatment of adult outpatients with COVID-19. However, our study was limited by the unavailability of the most recent information on the rapidly evolving pandemic, including new viral variants, patient populations affected, and changes in standards of care. Further research should explore the impact of vaccination on the cost effectiveness of molnupiravir and other therapies, based on real-world data, to account for these changes, including the impact of vaccination and immunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Outpatients , Adult , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Cytidine/analogs & derivatives , Humans , Hydroxylamines , Male , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Quality-Adjusted Life Years
5.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(1)2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741647

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among males worldwide. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a predictive indicator of prostate pathology. Men with elevated PSA levels are at increased risk of developing PC. There is currently no UK national PC screening programme, therefore patients often present to general practices (GPs) at later stages of pathology, worsening patient prognosis and outcomes. LOCAL PROBLEM: The location of the GP surgery had a large patient population at increased risk of PC, namely Afro-Caribbean/Asian males. METHODS: We conducted baseline measurements to identify male patients over the age of 65 and/or male patients who were at high risk of developing PC. These included previous referred patients or patients with a PSA over 10.0. We then implemented three plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles and measured their effect after 2 weeks of starting the respective intervention. INTERVENTIONS: PDSA1: Generating a list of target patients who have not had repeat/follow-up/referral and directly contacting by telephone to invite them for a blood test.PDSA2: Creating patient-specific electronic pop-up reminders on the electronic-patient-record system for PSA follow-up/referral/repeat test.Planned PDSA3: Patient education of prostate health and general self-checking, as well as benefits/risks of undergoing PSA screening in the form of patient focus groups and informative leaflets. RESULTS: We identified 220 male patients over 65 registered at a large South London GP surgery. 77.7% of eligible patients had a PSA measurement since 1 April 2019. Our results showed an overall increase in screening of 13.5% from baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Our project identified patients that may potentially have undiagnosed prostate pathology. However, a key factor for not reaching our goal was blood test refusal. This was further exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, impacting the capacity to disseminate appropriate information to the local population on the importance of PSA screening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practice , Prostatic Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology
6.
J Mater Chem B ; 10(6): 870-879, 2022 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704333

ABSTRACT

In this study, we developed a crystal-reconstructed-BiVO4 aptamer photoelectrochemical (PEC) biosensor by a high-energy laser treatment technique. This biosensor achieves a limit of detection (LOD) (0.82 ag mL-1), linear detection range (1 ag mL-1 to 2 ng mL-1), and resolution ratio (∼18 molecules per mL) for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tumor biomarker detection. Furthermore, reconstructed surface microstructure and oxygen vacancy doping energy formation after crystal reconstruction induce the stereo-hindrance effect and photogenerated hole energy is reduced during PSA target detection. In this case, a photocurrent inhibition phenomenon for PSA detection is noticed. Based on this photocurrent inversion phenomenon, some dysoxidizable nucleonic acid tumor (miRNA-21) and virus biomarkers (RdRp-COVID) can be detected with a LOD level of ∼10-16 M by linking the corresponding base paring probe on the surface of the crystal-reconstructed photoanode. In addition to high sensitivity, this PEC biosensor presents high detection specificity, stability, and accuracy in clinical verification. Thus, this crystal-reconstructed PEC biosensor shows application potential in the fields of multi-tumor or viral biomarker detection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Biomarkers, Tumor , Electrochemical Techniques/methods , Humans , Male , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Semiconductors
7.
Clin Nucl Med ; 47(2): e187-e189, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684923

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: A 79-year-old man with a history of prostate adenocarcinoma treated with prostatectomy underwent 18F-FCH PET/CT for restaging purpose, which was negative for relapse but showed the presence of choline-positive lymph nodes in the left axilla. The patient underwent a COVID-19 vaccination in the left arm 6 days prior. Thus, PET/CT findings were considered as inflammatory lymph nodes. With the current drive of global COVID-19 immunization, this case underlines the importance of knowing vaccination history to interpret correctly the findings and to avoid false-positive reports.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Prostatic Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines , Choline/analogs & derivatives , Humans , Male , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Positron-Emission Tomography , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Prostatectomy , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
8.
Curr Opin Urol ; 32(3): 311-317, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684904

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to uncertainty on the optimal management for prostate cancer (PCa). This narrative review aims to shed light on the optimal diagnosis and management of patients with or suspected to have PCa. RECENT FINDINGS: Faecal-oral or aerosol transmission is possible during prostate procedures; caution must be in place when performing digital rectal examinations, transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies and prostate surgeries requiring general anaesthesia. Patients must also be triaged using preoperative polymerase chain reaction tests for COVID-19. COVID-19 has accelerated the adoption of multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), reducing the need for prostate biopsy unless when absolutely indicated, and the risk of COVID-19 spread can be reduced. Combined with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density, amongst other factors, multiparametric MRI could reduce unnecessary biopsies in patients with little chance of clinically significant PCa. Treatment of PCa should be stratified by the risk level and preferences of the patient. COVID-19 has accelerated the development of telemedicine and clinicians should utilise safe and effective teleconsultations to protect themselves and their patients. SUMMARY: COVID-19 transmission during prostate procedures is possible. Patients with a Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) of <3 and PSA density <0.15 ng/ml/ml are deemed low-risk and are safe to undergo surveillance without MRI-targeted biopsy. Intermediate- or high-risk patients should be offered definitive treatment within four months or 30days of diagnosis to avoid compromising treatment outcomes; three-month courses of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy can be considered when a delay of surgery is anticipated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prostatic Neoplasms , Androgen Antagonists , Humans , Image-Guided Biopsy/methods , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Male , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/therapy , Retrospective Studies
9.
J Rheumatol ; 49(5): 523-530, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674900

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) hospitalization risk in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) compared with matched non-IMID comparators from the general population. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, matched cohort study using health administrative data from January to July 2020 in Ontario, Canada. Cohorts for each of the following IMIDs were assembled: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA), ankylosing spondylitis, systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs), multiple sclerosis (MS), iritis, inflammatory bowel disease, polymyalgia rheumatica, and vasculitis. Each patient was matched with 5 non-IMID comparators based on sociodemographic factors. We compared the cumulative incidence of hospitalizations for COVID-19 and their outcomes between IMID and non-IMID patients. RESULTS: A total of 493,499 patients with IMID (417 hospitalizations) and 2,466,946 non-IMID comparators (1519 hospitalizations) were assessed. The odds of being hospitalized for COVID-19 were significantly higher in patients with IMIDs compared with their matched non-IMID comparators (matched unadjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.37, adjusted OR 1.23). Significantly higher risk of hospitalizations was found in patients with iritis (OR 1.46), MS (OR 1.83), PsA (OR 2.20), RA (OR 1.42), SARDs (OR 1.47), and vasculitis (OR 2.07). COVID-19 hospitalizations were associated with older age, male sex, long-term care residence, multimorbidity, and lower income. The odds of complicated hospitalizations were 21% higher among all IMID vs matched non-IMID patients, but this association was attenuated after adjusting for demographic factors and comorbidities. CONCLUSION: Patients with IMIDs were at higher risk of being hospitalized with COVID-19. This risk was explained in part by their comorbidities.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Iritis , Multiple Sclerosis , Vasculitis , Arthritis, Psoriatic/epidemiology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Iritis/complications , Male , Ontario/epidemiology , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Vasculitis/complications
10.
J Rheumatol ; 49(5): 531-536, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625905

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We assessed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine uptake among individuals with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) and the Ontario general population. METHODS: We studied all residents aged ≥ 16 years who were alive and enrolled in the Ontario Health Insurance Plan as of December 14, 2020, when vaccination commenced (n = 12,435,914). Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), psoriasis (PsO), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were identified using established disease-specific case definitions applied to health administrative data. Vaccination status was extracted from the provincial COVaxON registry. Weekly cumulative proportions of first and second doses up until October 3, 2021, were expressed as the vaccinated percentage of each disease group, compared to the general Ontario population, and stratified by age. RESULTS: By October 3, 2021, the cumulative percentage with at least 1 dose was 82.1% for the general population, 88.9% for those with RA, 87.4% for AS, 90.6% for PsA, 87.3% for PsO, and 87.0% for IBD. There was also a higher total cumulative percentage with 2 doses among IMIDs (83.8-88.2%) vs the general population (77.9%). The difference was also evident when stratifying by age. Individuals with IMIDs in the youngest age group initially had earlier uptake than the general population but remain the lowest age group with 2 doses (70.6% in the general population vs. 73.7-79.2% across IMID groups). CONCLUSION: While implementation of COVID-19 vaccination programs has differed globally, these Canadian estimates are the first to reassuringly show higher COVID-19 vaccine uptake among individuals with IMIDs.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Psoriasis , Spondylitis, Ankylosing , Arthritis, Psoriatic/epidemiology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/epidemiology , Male , Ontario/epidemiology , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Spondylitis, Ankylosing/epidemiology , Vaccination
12.
Urology ; 159: 16-21, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525974

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of SARS CoV-2 on serum total PSA levels in men with BPH diagnosed with COVID-19. METHODS: The PSA (Kit: Immunoassay Program- Cycle 18, Siemens Atellica IM Analyzer) levels in patients who had had a PSA check at least 3 months, but no more than 6 months, prior to diagnosis of acute COVID-19 infection, were examined retrospectively. PSA levels were measured and recorded from these patients on the first day of diagnosis of COVID-19. These patients were called back for urology outpatient follow-up at the third month after the end of the COVID-19 treatment. PSA levels measured in the pre-COVID-19 period, during the period of active infection with COVID-19, and in the post-COVID-19 period were compared. RESULTS: In total, 91 patients had a serum PSA level of 1.58 ± 1.09 ng/mL in the pre-COVID-19 period, a serum PSA level of 4.34 ± 3.78 ng/mL measured in the COVID-19 period and 2.09 ± 2.70 ng/mL in the post-COVID-19 period. It was determined that the serum PSA level measured during active COVID-19 infection was statistically significantly higher than the PSA levels measured according to the pre-COVID-19 period and the post-COVID-19 period (P < .001, P < .001; respectively). CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 infection in men diagnosed with BPH causes significant increases in PSA levels during the active period of the disease. Measurement of PSA values used in the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and follow-up of prostate diseases in the acute period of infection and in the early period after infection treatment may cause false evaluations that may affect the diagnosis and treatment steps of prostate diseases in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Prostate-Specific Antigen/blood , Prostatic Hyperplasia/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prostatic Hyperplasia/blood
14.
JCO Clin Cancer Inform ; 5: 1028-1033, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468135

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study examined changes in prostate disease screening (prostatic-specific antigen [PSA] testing), prostate biopsy testing, and prostate cancer diagnoses during the COVID-19 pandemic through December 2020. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This analysis included test results from men ≥ 40 years, without prior International Classification of Diseases-10 record of prostate cancer since January 2016, who received PSA or prostate biopsy testing at Quest Diagnostics during January 2018-December 2020. Monthly trends were evaluated for three periods: prepandemic (January 2018-February 2020), early-pandemic (March-May 2020), and late-pandemic (June-December 2020). RESULTS: Meeting inclusion criteria were 16,365,833 PSA and 48,819 prostate biopsy results. The average monthly number of PSA tests declined from 465,187 prepandemic to 295,786 early-pandemic (36.4% decrease; P = .01) before rebounding to 483,374 (3.9% increase; P = .23) late-pandemic. The monthly average number of PSA results ≥ 50 ng/mL (23,356; 0.14% of all PSA results) dipped from 659 prepandemic to 506 early-pandemic (23.2% decrease; P = .02) and rebounded to 674 late-pandemic (2.3% increase; P = .65). The average monthly number of prostate biopsy results decreased from 1,453 prepandemic to 903 early-pandemic (37.9% decrease; P = .01) before rebounding to 1,190 late-pandemic (18.1% decrease; P = .01). The average monthly number for Gleason score ≥ 8 (6,241; 12.8% of all prostate biopsies) declined from 182 prepandemic to 130 early-pandemic (28.6% decrease; P = .02) and decreased to 161 late-pandemic (11.5% decrease; P = .02). CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that a substantial number of prostate screening opportunities and cancer diagnoses have been missed. Efforts are needed to bring such patients back for screening and diagnostic testing and to restore appropriate care for non-COVID-19-related medical conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Early Detection of Cancer/statistics & numerical data , Prostate-Specific Antigen/analysis , Prostatic Neoplasms , Biopsy , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prostate , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology
15.
Clin Nucl Med ; 47(2): e187-e189, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447686

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: A 79-year-old man with a history of prostate adenocarcinoma treated with prostatectomy underwent 18F-FCH PET/CT for restaging purpose, which was negative for relapse but showed the presence of choline-positive lymph nodes in the left axilla. The patient underwent a COVID-19 vaccination in the left arm 6 days prior. Thus, PET/CT findings were considered as inflammatory lymph nodes. With the current drive of global COVID-19 immunization, this case underlines the importance of knowing vaccination history to interpret correctly the findings and to avoid false-positive reports.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Prostatic Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines , Choline/analogs & derivatives , Humans , Male , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Positron-Emission Tomography , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Prostatectomy , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
16.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e048144, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443592

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The primary objective of the ReIMAGINE Prostate Cancer Screening Study is to explore the uptake of an invitation to prostate cancer screening using MRI. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The ReIMAGINE Prostate Cancer Screening Study is a prospective single-centre feasibility study. Eligible men aged 50-75 years with no prior prostate cancer diagnosis or treatment will be identified through general practitioner practices and randomly selected for invitation. Those invited will be offered an MRI scan and a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test. The screening MRI scan consists of T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted and research-specific sequences, without the use of intravenous contrast agents. Men who screen positive on either MRI or PSA density will be recommended to have standard of care (National Health Service) tests for prostate cancer assessment, which includes multiparametric MRI. The study will assess the acceptability of an MRI-based prostate screening assessment and the prevalence of cancer detected in MRI-screened men. Summary statistics will be used to explore baseline characteristics in relation to acceptance rates and prevalence of cancer. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: ReIMAGINE Prostate Cancer Screening is a single-site screening study to assess the feasibility of MRI as a screening tool for prostate cancer. Ethical approval was granted by London-Stanmore Research Ethics Committee Heath Research Authority (reference 19/LO/1129). Study results will be published in peer-reviewed journals after completion of data analysis and used to inform the design of a multicentre screening study in the UK. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov Registry (NCT04063566).


Subject(s)
Prostate-Specific Antigen , Prostatic Neoplasms , Aged , Early Detection of Cancer , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , State Medicine
18.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 67Suppl 1(Suppl 1): 86-90, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362149

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This article aims to alert health professionals for cancer screening in the face of the possibility of new waves of disease. METHODS: A narrative review was conducted through a search in MEDLINE, Lilacs, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and international medical societies publications. RESULTS: Breast cancer: in high-risk patients (confirmed familial cancer syndrome or with high-risk tools scores), clinicians should act according to usual recommendations; in average-risk individuals, consider screening with mammography with a longer time span (maximum of two years). Cervical cancer: women turning 25 years old who have already been immunized and with no previous Pap test can have the test postponed during the pandemic; if there is no previous dose of Human Papillomavirus vaccination, initiation of screening should be recommended following a more rigid approach for COVID prevention; in women over 30 years of age who have never participated in cervical screening, the first screening exam is also essential. Colorectal cancer: if the individual is at elevated risk for familial cancer, the screening with colonoscopy according to usual recommendations should be supported; if at average risk consider screening with Fecal Occult Blood Test. Prostate cancer: there is a trend to postpone routine prostate cancer screening until the pandemic subsides. CONCLUSIONS: The decision to keep cancer screening must be discussed and individualized, considering the possibility of new waves of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Prostatic Neoplasms , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Adult , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Male , Mass Screening , Prostate-Specific Antigen , SARS-CoV-2 , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control
19.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 61(5): 1795-1801, 2022 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343712

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the reliability of virtual video-assisted visits, added to the tight-control strategy for inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRDs), in identifying patients who need treatment adjustment. METHODS: Tightly followed-up adult patients with RA, PsA, AS or SLE took part in a video consultation during COVID19 lockdown and repeated the same rheumatology evaluations through a face-to-face visit within 2 weeks. The sensitivity and specificity of the virtual visits for treatment decisions (categorized as: unchanged, adjusted/escalated, tapered/discontinued, need for further examinations), and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for virtually measured disease activity and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were calculated with 95% CIs using face-to-face visits as the reference method. RESULTS: In 89 out of 106 patients (84.0%), face-to-face visits confirmed the remotely delivered treatment decision. Video-visiting showed excellent sensitivity (94.1% with 95% CI: 71.3%, 99.9%) and specificity (96.7%; 95% CI: 90.8%, 99.3%) in identifying the need for treatment adjustment due to inadequate disease control. The major driver for the low sensitivity of virtual video consultation (55.6%; 95% CI: 21.2%, 86.3%) in identifying the need for treatment tapering was SLE diagnosis [odds ratio (OR) 10.0; 95% CI: 3.1, 32.3; P <0.001], mostly because of discordance with face-to-face consultation in glucocorticoid tapering. Remotely evaluated PROs showed high reliability (ICC range 0.80-0.95), while disease activity measures had less consistent data (ICC range 0.50-0.95), especially for those diseases requiring more extensive physical examination, such as in SLE and PsA. CONCLUSION: Video-visiting proved to have high reliability in identifying the need for treatment adjustment and might support the IRDs standard tight-control strategy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/diagnosis , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/therapy , Male , Pandemics , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Referral and Consultation , Reproducibility of Results , Telemedicine/methods
20.
Aging Male ; 24(1): 92-94, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328899

ABSTRACT

Digital rectal examination (DRE) is routinely performed as part of a urology clinical assessment in patients with a clinical suspicion of prostate cancer. An abnormal DRE or a raised prostate specific antigen (PSA) level are part of the criteria for primary care referral to secondary care due to a suspicion of prostate cancer. The current Coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in the rapid adoption of virtual consultations in the form of telephone or video consultations making clinical examination difficult. In the case of prostate cancer diagnostic pathways, often clinicians now rely on PSA measurements and MRI, where radiological services are available, without the requirement for a DRE. We discuss the limited role DRE has in the modern prostate cancer diagnostic pathway due to the widespread adoption of MRI particularly in the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
Digital Rectal Examination , Prostate-Specific Antigen/blood , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2
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