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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242820

ABSTRACT

While the prevalence rates of Internet addiction (IA) amongst young people during the pandemic are disturbing, few studies have investigated the risk and protective factors of IA in Hong Kong university students under COVID-19. In this study, we examined the relationship between COVID-19-related stress and IA and the role of psychological morbidity and positive psychological attributes in the relationship. In summer 2022, 978 university students completed a survey assessing pandemic-related stress, psychological morbidity, and positive psychological attributes. While psychological morbidity was indexed by depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behavior, positive psychological attributes included life satisfaction, flourishing, adversity beliefs, emotional competence, resilience, and family functioning measures. Results showed that stress and psychological morbidity positively predicted IA, and psychological morbidity mediated the association between stress and IA. Positive psychological attributes negatively predicted stress and IA, and mediated the connection between stress and IA. Positive psychological attributes moderated the mediating effect of psychological morbidity on the relationship between stress and IA. In addition to theoretical contributions, this study contributes to IA prevention and treatment: reducing psychological morbidity and promoting positive psychological attributes are promising strategies to address IA issues in young people.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Humans , Adolescent , Universities , Protective Factors , Internet Addiction Disorder , Pandemics , Students/psychology , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , Behavior, Addictive/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Risk Factors , Internet
2.
Cancer Med ; 12(8): 9662-9667, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2293533

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 pandemic had a considerable impact among haematological patients. On the other hand, the effect of this disease on patients (pts) affected by Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is not clearly defined. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate mortality-hospitalization rates and possible protective factors for hospitalization in CML pts affected by COVID. METHODS: We collected data from CML patients followed at our institution whotested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection. The following variables were assessed: demographical data, type of TKI therapy, vaccination status, presence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), period of infection, COVID-19 presenting symptoms, severity and mortality. Data were collected retrospectively and then analysed in univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Out of a total of 325 CML pts treated at our institution, we recorded 72 SARS-CoV-2pts (22%) who tested positive with a SARS-CoV-2 PCR assay. Twenty two were infected in 2020 (30%), 16 patients in 2021 (22%) and 34 in 2022 (46%); with a hospitalization rate of 27%, 25% and 3% respectively. Of the 72 confirmed infections, 13 pts (18%; (CI) 10-28) were asymptomatic and 48 (66%; CI: 55-76) had mild symptoms. A total of 11 pts were admitted to hospital and 3 of these required ICU admission. No deaths were recorded. The probability of hospitalization was significantly reduced if patients were vaccinated (odds ratio OR 0.037 with CI: 0-0.33 p 0.002) or treated with Bosutinib (OR 0.06 with CI: 0-0.5 p 0.008). CONCLUSION: In the present study, no significant increase in mortality was noted among patients with CML as compared to the general population inItaly. Vaccination and treatment with bosutinib were identified as baseline characteristics that were associated with a decreased risk of hospitalitazion resulting from COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , Protective Factors , Pandemics , Hospitalization , Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive/drug therapy
3.
Curr Psychiatry Rep ; 25(4): 165-174, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286605

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review examines the challenges faced by parents in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, their emotional reactions, and risk and protective factors in their adjustment. Clinical and policy implications are discussed, and recommendations for future study are offered. RECENT FINDINGS: The literature reveals numerous stresses experienced by parents during the pandemic. Many parents facing COVID-19-related challenges suffered traumatic stress, depression, and/or anxiety, though most have adapted well over time. Demographic factors, pre-existing vulnerabilities, employment and household responsibilities, and family structure and cohesion influenced psychological outcomes. The pandemic lockdown created obstacles to accessing medical, mental health, educational, social, recreational, and other supportive programs and services for families, further increasing the burden on parents. The pandemic has exacerbated existing vulnerabilities and triggered pervasive parental stress. The lockdown affected families differently based on their pre-existing vulnerabilities and available resources. Additional research using more rigorous methodological approaches is warranted to identify and address the needs of parents during public health crises like pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Protective Factors , Communicable Disease Control , Pandemics , Parents , Stress, Psychological
4.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol ; 58(7): 1109-1120, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2263089

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Many studies report about risk factors associated with adverse changes in mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic while few studies report about protective and buffering factors, especially in older adults. We present an observational study to assess protective and buffering factors against COVID-19 related adverse mental health changes in older adults. METHODS: 899 older adults (55 +) in the Netherlands were followed from 2018/19 to two pandemic time points (June-October 2020 and March-August 2021). Questionnaires included exposure to pandemic-related adversities ("COVID-19 exposure"), depressive and anxiety symptoms, loneliness, and pre-pandemic functioning. Linear regression analyses estimated main effects of COVID-19 exposure and protective factors on mental health changes; interaction effects were tested to identify buffering factors. RESULTS: Compared to pre-pandemic, anxiety symptoms, depression symptoms and loneliness increased. A higher score on the COVID-19 adversity index was associated with stronger negative mental health changes. Main effects: internet use and high mastery decreased depressive symptoms; a larger network decreased anxiety symptoms; female gender, larger network size and praying decreased loneliness. COVID-19 vaccination buffered against COVID-19 exposure-induced anxiety and loneliness, a partner buffered against COVID-19 exposure induced loneliness. CONCLUSION: Exposure to COVID-19 adversity had a cumulative negative impact on mental health. Improving coping, finding meaning, stimulating existing religious and spiritual resources, network interventions and stimulating internet use may enable older adults to maintain mental health during events with large societal impact, yet these factors appear protective regardless of exposure to specific adversities. COVID-19 vaccination had a positive effect on mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , Female , Aged , Longitudinal Studies , Netherlands , Protective Factors , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics , Anxiety , Loneliness , Depression
5.
Psychiatry Res ; 323: 115119, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262789

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is an ongoing global crisis, with a multitude of factors that affect mental health worldwide. We explored potential predictors for the emergence and maintenance of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in the general population in Israel. METHODS: Across the span of 16 months, 2478 people completed a repeated self-report survey which inquired psychiatric symptoms and pandemic related stress factors (PRSF). We applied mixed-effects models to assess how each stressor contributes to depression, anxiety and PTSS at each time point, and longitudinally assessed participants who completed at least two consecutive surveys (n = 400). We weighted our sample to increase representativeness of the population. RESULTS: Fatigue was the strongest predictor for depression, anxiety and PTSS at all time points, and predicted deterioration overtime. Financial concerns associated with depression and anxiety at all time points, and with their deterioration overtime. Health related concerns were uniquely associated with anxiety and PTSS at all time points and their deterioration, but not with depression. Improvement in sense of protection overtime associated with decrease in depression and anxiety. Hesitancy towards vaccination was associated to higher financial concerns and lower sense of protection by the authorities. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings accentuate the multitude of risk factors for psychiatric morbidity during COVID-19, and the centrality of fatigue in determining mental health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Israel/epidemiology , Protective Factors , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care
6.
J Fr Ophtalmol ; 46(5): 527-535, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262113

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the impact of lens status on macular function among patients treated for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD) in whom scheduled intravitreal injections were delayed. METHODS: We reviewed demographic and clinical data as well as macular optical coherence tomographic images of 34 patients (48 eyes) who did not follow their injection schedule during the first wave of COVID-19 in Israel. Functional worsening was defined as a loss of at least 0.1 in decimal best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Morphological worsening was defined as new or increased subretinal/intraretinal fluid or a new hemorrhage. OCT indices of quality were used as a measure for cataract density and progression. RESULTS: Pseudophakia was associated with a better functional outcome than phakic status: there was a loss of 0.06±0.12 vs. 0.15±0.10 decimal BCVA in the pseudophakic and phakic eyes, respectively (P=.001). A similar trend was observed for morphological changes over the same period: there was an increase in macular thickness of 9±26% vs.12±40%, respectively (P=0.79). During the first wave of COVID-19, the index of OCT quality remained stable for phakic eyes (26±3.6 before the first wave of COVID-19, 26±2.9 afterward; P=1) and pseudophakic eyes (30±2.4 before the first wave of COVID-19, 30±2.6 afterward; P=1). CONCLUSION: Pseudophakic eyes with nvAMD that missed their scheduled intravitreal injections experienced fewer morphological and functional complications than phakic eyes with nvAMD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Macular Degeneration , Humans , Angiogenesis Inhibitors , COVID-19/complications , Intravitreal Injections , Macular Degeneration/complications , Macular Degeneration/diagnosis , Macular Degeneration/epidemiology , Protective Factors , Pseudophakia/epidemiology , Pseudophakia/complications , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, Optical Coherence/methods , Treatment Outcome
7.
Inj Prev ; 29(3): 259-261, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2260672

ABSTRACT

Using a shared risk and protective factor (SRPF) approach to prevention acknowledges a shift in the ways we work. The fundamental question at the root of our efforts should no longer be how we address a single, specific public health issue. Instead, we should be asking how we can develop a system that supports well-being holistically. We should be striving to increase the resources to which people have access in a way that proactively prevents multiple public health issues, improves the context in which people live out their lives, and develops a broad spectrum of resilience.The fields of injury and violence prevention (IVP) and public health are at a critical juncture to address the true causes of injuries and violence. It is imminently vital for all stakeholders across IVP to work upstream and align funding, interventions, and evaluations in ways that embrace SRPF approaches. The value of this approach is multifold: it tackles multiple population health outcomes through multisector interventions, it positively impacts social determinants of health; it is sustainable and it maximises financial resources. While theoretical buy-in for the SRPF approach is high, there remain challenges in the field to operationalise such an approach. The time is now for the field to collectively embrace an SRPF approach and rally together to strengthen the evidence base. Researchers, practitioners, funders and national organisations must align their goals in prioritising upstream, primary prevention through addressing SRPF to enhance public health infrastructure and reduce societal inequities.


Subject(s)
Public Health , Violence , Humans , Protective Factors , Violence/prevention & control , Risk Factors
8.
J Patient Rep Outcomes ; 7(1): 29, 2023 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2259456

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic presents a unique, amplified threat to those living with a cancer diagnosis, but personal factors may play a role in how this affects well-being. This cross-sectional study (1) describes the impacts of COVID-19 on cancer patients' lives, and (2) explores the extent to which specific impacts of COVID-19 and noted protective factors, hope and resilience, predict two crucial patient-reported outcomes, depression and anxiety, after controlling for relevant sociodemographic and clinical factors. METHODS: 520 cancer patients and survivors in the U.S. completed an online survey during the first year of the pandemic and answered questions about COVID-19 areas of impact, psychological well-being, hope, and resilience. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to analyze the unique impact of each group of variables on patient-reported levels of depression and anxiety during the pandemic. RESULTS: Participants strongly endorsed COVID-19 impact across several areas of life, especially social activity, well-being, and ability to acquire basic essentials. Regression models explained a substantial amount of variance in patient-reported depression (R2 = .50, p < .001) and anxiety (R2 = .44, p < .001), revealing COVID-19 financial impact as a significant predictor of depression (ß = 0.07), and COVID-19 family impact as a significant predictor of anxiety (ß = 0.14), even after controlling for the effects of relevant sociodemographic and clinical variables. Additionally, resilience and hope were the largest predictors of both depression (ß = - 0.19 and - 0.37, respectively) and anxiety (ß = - 0.18 and - 0.29), suggesting that they account for unique variance in patient-reported mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic and might serve as important protective factors. CONCLUSIONS: The current results add to existing literature documenting the significant effect of COVID-19 on those living with cancer. COVID-19 impact, including financial and family well-being, as well as positive psychological constructs, hope and resilience, play a crucial role in levels of patient-reported depression and anxiety during the pandemic. As COVID-19 continues to evolve, health care providers should routinely assess psychological well-being and needs related to COVID-19 financial and family impact in an effort to appropriately align individuals with resources and support, and consider how hope and resilience can be fostered to serve as psychological buffers during this time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Depression/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Protective Factors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology
9.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0282744, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2267243

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Thousands of Eastern Europeans find employment caring for older individuals as transmigrating live-in home care workers in private households in Germany. Studies have shown that the stressors threatening their well-being are multifaceted and include inequalities and a high practical and emotional workload, but research on protective factors is still scarce. AIM & METHODS: This qualitative descriptive study focuses on both the stressors and factors that promote care workers' well-being and contribute to their psychological resilience. In guideline-based interviews, 14 female and one male care workers were asked about their stressors and the factors that help them cope. RESULTS: Identified stressors included separation from their own family, strained relationship with either or both the care recipient (dementia) and their relatives (violation of worker´s rights and devaluation of care work), and permanent availability and lack of free time due to a 24-h care schedule. Resilience factors were both external and internal and included positive social relationships, self-determination, experience in care work, and intrinsic job motivation. CONCLUSION: Live-ins reside in an ambiguous setting, exposed to both structural and individual strains. However, external and internal resilience factors contribute to a generally positive attitude toward their job and indicate the agency of this precariously employed group. A socially anchored appreciation of their work and an officially controlled expansion of free time are mandatory to improve the working conditions of live-in care workers.


Subject(s)
Home Care Services , Transients and Migrants , Humans , Male , Female , Protective Factors , Interpersonal Relations , Germany
10.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1010264, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2256812

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate and model the interactions between a range of risk and protective factors for suicidal ideation using general population data collected during the critical phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Bayesian network analyses were applied to cross-sectional data collected 1 month after the COVID-19 lockdown measures were implemented in Austria and the United Kingdom. In nationally representative samples (n = 1,005 Austria; n = 1,006 UK), sociodemographic features and a multi-domain battery of health, wellbeing and quality of life (QOL) measures were completed. Predictive accuracy was examined using the area under the curve (AUC) within-sample (country) and out-of-sample. Results: The AUC of the Bayesian network models were ≥ 0.84 within-sample and ≥0.79 out-of-sample, explaining close to 50% of variability in suicidal ideation. In total, 15 interrelated risk and protective factors were identified. Seven of these factors were replicated in both countries: depressive symptoms, loneliness, anxiety symptoms, self-efficacy, resilience, QOL physical health, and QOL living environment. Conclusions: Bayesian network models had high predictive accuracy. Several psychosocial risk and protective factors have complex interrelationships that influence suicidal ideation. It is possible to predict suicidal risk with high accuracy using this information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicidal Ideation , Humans , Quality of Life , Protective Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Bayes Theorem , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(3)2023 01 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2225157

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in December 2019 and the associated restrictions, mental health in children and adolescents has been increasingly discussed in the media. Negative impacts of the pandemic, including a sharp increase in psychopathology and, consequently, reduced quality of life, appear to have particularly affected children and young people, who may be especially vulnerable to the adverse effects of isolation. Nevertheless, many children and adolescents have managed to cope well with the restrictions, without deterioration of their mental health. The present study therefore explored the links between COVID-19 infection (in oneself or a family member, as well as the death of a family member due to the virus), protective factors such as self-efficacy, resilience, self-esteem, and health-related quality of life, and measures of psychopathology such as depression scores, internalizing/externalizing problems, emotion dysregulation, and victimization. For this purpose, we examined data from 2129 adolescents (mean age = 12.31, SD = 0.67; 51% male; 6% born outside of Germany) using a structural equation model. We found medium to high loadings of the manifest variables with the latent variables (COVID-19, protective factors, and psychopathology). Protective factors showed a significant negative correlation with psychopathology. However, COVID-19 had a weak connection with psychopathology in our sample. External pandemic-related factors (e.g., restrictions) and their interaction with existing psychopathology or individual protective factors appear to have a greater influence on young people's mental health than the impact of the virus per se. Sociopolitical efforts should be undertaken to foster prevention and promote individual resilience, especially in adolescence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Child , Humans , Male , Adolescent , Female , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Protective Factors , Pandemics , Quality of Life , COVID-19/epidemiology
12.
Schizophr Res ; 252: 309-316, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2183032

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Although plenty of evidence has shown the huge negative impact of COVID-19 on individuals' mental health conditions, little is known about its impact on the psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) in the general population. We aim to explore the prevalence of PLEs and relevant influential factors among adolescents during COVID-19 lockdown. METHODS: A total of 3234 students completed one online survey between April to May 2020. PLEs were assessed using the 15-item Positive Subscale of the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE-P15). Resilience, social support, childhood trauma, and a series of socio-demographic factors were also evaluated. RESULTS: In this sample, 51.4 % adolescents reported having at least one PLE, while 11.6 % experienced PLEs frequently during COVID-19 lockdown. Senior high school students showed more frequent PLEs than college students (p < 0.001). Female gender (OR = 1.77), history of mental disorders (OR = 3.07) or chronic physical illness (OR = 2.04), having relatives or friends being infected with COVID-19 (OR = 3.12), longer daily exposure to media coverage of the COVID-19 (OR = 1.60), and more childhood trauma (OR = 1.54-3.49) were correlated with more frequent PLEs, while higher resilience (OR = 0.35-0.54) and more perceived social support (OR = 0.63-0.72) were associated with decreased odds for frequent PLEs. Additionally, there were several differences among the influential factors between senior high school and college students. CONCLUSIONS: PLEs were relatively common among Chinese adolescents, with higher prevalence among senior high school students during COVID-19 lockdown. Adolescents with specific characteristics should receive more attention in the development of intervention measures in mental health during pandemic lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Psychotic Disorders , Humans , Adolescent , Female , Psychotic Disorders/psychology , Prevalence , Protective Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Risk Factors
13.
PLoS One ; 18(1): e0279034, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2197065

ABSTRACT

Confinements due to the COVID-19 outbreak affected sleep and mental health of adults, adolescents and children. Already preschool children experienced acutely worsened sleep, yet the possible resulting effects on executive functions remain unexplored. Longitudinally, sleep quality predicts later behavioral-cognitive outcomes. Accordingly, we propose children's sleep behavior as essential for healthy cognitive development. By using the COVID-19 confinement as an observational-experimental intervention, we tested whether worsened children's sleep affects executive functions outcomes 6 months downstream. We hypothesized that acutely increased night awakenings and sleep latency relate to reduced later executive functions. With an online survey during the acute confinement phase we analyzed sleep behavior in 45 children (36-72 months). A first survey referred to the (retrospective) time before and (acute) situation during confinement, and a follow-up survey assessed executive functions 6 months later (6 months retrospectively). Indeed, acutely increased nighttime awakenings related to reduced inhibition at FOLLOW-UP. Associations were specific to the confinement-induced sleep-change and not the sleep behavior before confinement. These findings highlight that specifically acute changes of children's nighttime sleep during sensitive periods are associated with behavioral outcome consequences. This aligns with observations in animals that inducing poor sleep during developmental periods affects later brain function.


Subject(s)
Executive Function , Sleep , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Executive Function/physiology , Protective Factors , Retrospective Studies , Sleep/physiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/physiopathology , Child
14.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 46, 2023 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196139

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Men account for three-quarters of all suicide deaths in many Western nations including Australia. Whilst extensive research has examined risk factors for suicidal ideation and behaviour in men, protective factors remain underexplored, particularly social support, resilience and coping behaviours. Such factors are important to examine particularly in the context of COVID-19, where enforced isolation (among other negative lifestyle effects) has created widespread risk for the development of suicidal ideation. This mixed-methods study aimed to examine associations of various protective factors with suicidal ideation in men, using data from an online survey conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, we aimed to qualitatively investigate men's self-reported protective strategies when experiencing suicidal thoughts and behaviour. METHODS: A convenience sample of 700 men (age M = 50.3 years; SD = 15.2 years) responded to an online survey including quantitative measures of suicidal ideation, planning and attempt, alongside employment and relationship status, coping, social support, resilience, and a qualitative free-text item gauging men's self-reported protective strategies. Multinomial logistic regression was applied to compare odds of sub-categories of suicide risk (ideation; planning) according to protective factors. Qualitative responses were analysed via thematic analysis. RESULTS: Men in a relationship, and those lower in emotion-focused and avoidant coping reported lower odds of suicidal ideation. Maintaining employment throughout the pandemic was protective against suicidal ideation and planning; as was greater perceived social support from friends. Greater self-reported resilience was protective against suicidal ideation and planning. Qualitative analyses led to the development of two themes: coping and connecting, reflecting men's intra- and interpersonal management strategies; and sustaining selflessness, where men's imaginings of the collateral damage of their suicidal behaviour was protective against action on suicidal thoughts or plans. CONCLUSIONS: Findings of this study speak to the nuanced roles of interpersonal connections, resilience and coping behaviours in protecting against suicidal ideation and planning in men. In addition, qualitative insights further cement men's identification with familial protector and/or provider roles as protective against suicidal action.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicidal Ideation , Male , Humans , Middle Aged , Protective Factors , Pandemics , Men , Risk Factors
15.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 42: 55-59, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2165074

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted the quality of life of individuals around the world, including health care professionals. There has been little research that examines the role of resilience concerning the impact of COVID-19 on the quality of life of nursing students. This study aimed to determine how resilience influenced the quality of life among nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional research design was adopted for this study. A total of two hundred sixty-eight nursing students from three universities, South India responded in the web-based survey. Data was collected using self-reported questionnaires in June 2021. RESULTS: Our findings revealed that the participants' resilience was normal, which had a moderate impact on the quality of life of nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 impact on QoL significantly differed with year of education (F = 3.087; p < 0.02) and university (F = 6.697, p < 0.001). Bivariate analysis revealed significant inverse relationships between the impact of COVID-19 on quality of life with resilience (r = -0.259; p < 0.001) and perceived knowledge on COVID-19(r = -0.168; p < 0.006). CONCLUSION: In our study, we found that resilience had a moderate impact on the quality of life of nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, it is important to promote students' resilience and improve their quality of life during stressful situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , Quality of Life , Protective Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics
16.
Addict Behav ; 139: 107590, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2158322

ABSTRACT

This large-scale meta-analysis aimed to provide the most comprehensive synthesis to date of the available evidence from the pre-COVID period on risk and protective factors for (internet) gaming disorder (as defined in the DSM-5 or ICD-11) across all studied populations. The risk/protective factors included demographic characteristics, psychological, psychopathological, social, and gaming-related factors. In total, we have included 1,586 effects from 253 different studies, summarizing data from 210,557 participants. Apart from estimating these predictive associations and relevant moderating effects, we implemented state-of-the-art adjustments for publication bias, psychometric artifacts, and other forms of bias arising from the publication process. Additionally, we carried out an in-depth assessment of the quality of underlying evidence by examining indications of selective reporting, statistical inconsistencies, the typical power of utilized study designs to detect theoretically relevant effects, and performed various sensitivity analyses. The available evidence suggests the existence of numerous moderately strong and highly heterogeneous risk factors (e.g., male gender, depression, impulsivity, anxiety, stress, gaming time, escape motivation, or excessive use of social networks) but only a few empirically robust protective factors (self-esteem, intelligence, life satisfaction, and education; all having markedly smaller effect sizes). We discuss the theoretical implications of our results for prominent theoretical models of gaming disorder and for the existing and future prevention strategies. The impact of various examined biasing factors on the available evidence seemed to be modest, yet we identified shortcomings in the measurement and reporting practices.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Video Games , Humans , Male , Protective Factors , Behavior, Addictive/psychology , Video Games/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Internet
17.
Am J Case Rep ; 23: e938450, 2022 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2164248

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Patients with multiple comorbidities who are infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have a higher risk of mortality. However, treatment with mepolizumab may be a key factor in counteracting the risk of these comorbidities. We present a patient who had an uneventful recovery from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), despite having 5 independent risk factors for severe disease and increased mortality. CASE REPORT A 75-year-old man with a long-standing history of asthma, chronic bronchitis, coronary artery disease, and hypertension presented to the Emergency Department in November 2020 with a 4-day history of fever, chills, shortness of breath, cough, and fatigue. Six months prior to this presentation, the patient was hospitalized for severe chronic bronchitis and acute exacerbation of asthma. His medications included mepolizumab, aclidinium, ramipril, diltiazem, aspirin, albuterol sulfate, and micronized budesonide/micronized formoterol fumarate dihydrate. Physical examination was unremarkable, except for cardiopulmonary distress. Laboratory tests showed leucocytosis. His chest X-ray revealed infiltrates and interstitial edema in the lower lung fields. A PCR test for SARS-CoV-2 was positive. COVID-19 pneumonia was diagnosed, and the patient was admitted to the hospital, where he was treated with acetaminophen, amoxicillin, dexamethasone, and supplemental oxygen. The patient remained stable and was discharged from the hospital the following day. He was free of all symptoms after 21 days. CONCLUSIONS This case of a 75-year-old man who presented with mild COVID-19 supports the findings from other reports of improvement in clinical outcomes for some patients with asthma who received treatment with mepolizumab.


Subject(s)
Asthma , Bronchitis, Chronic , COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Protective Factors , Risk Factors , Asthma/drug therapy
18.
Front Public Health ; 10: 738634, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142305

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic may result in detrimental consequences for stroke patient's wellbeing. Family functioning and optimism could help stroke patients cope with crises leading to possible improvements in life satisfaction. This study aims to explore the protective effects of family functioning and optimism on life satisfaction among stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. This study was designed as a cross-sectional survey. A total of 207 stroke inpatients who were receiving pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation in general public hospital of Liaoning province during the COVID-19 pandemic in China were consecutive selected and interviewed by online questionnaires via the WeChat platform effectively from April 8 to 30, 2020. The scales included: Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Family Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve (APGAR) Scale and Revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R). Hierarchical multiple regression (HMR) analysis was conducted to test the associated factors of life satisfaction. Stroke patient's life satisfaction was at a high level (Mean = 26.46, SD = 6.23) during the pandemic. Stroke patient's residence, duration of stroke, stroke type, and community shut down measures were the strong predictors of life satisfaction. Family functioning and optimism increased life satisfaction among stroke patients. This study contributes to the research on the association between family functioning and optimism on life satisfaction among stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Interventions that improve family functioning and enhance optimism should be provided in order to elevate life satisfaction for stroke patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Personal Satisfaction , Protective Factors , Stroke/epidemiology
19.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277631, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140656

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 caused high psychological burden for many people. Some people tend to excessive social media use (SMU) to escape the negative emotions which can foster addictive tendencies. The present study investigated positive mental health (PMH) and mindfulness as protective factors that could reduce the risk for addictive SMU. Data of 1,049 participants from Germany were assessed via online surveys in autumn 2021. The current results reveal a positive relationship between COVID-19 burden and addictive SMU. Both were negatively linked to PMH and mindfulness. In a moderated mediation analysis, the relationship between COVID-19 burden and addictive SMU was mediated by PMH. Mindfulness moderated the association between PMH and addictive SMU. The COVID-19 situation can be burdensome and contribute to dysfunctional coping strategies such as addictive SMU. However, PMH and mindfulness serve as protective factors. The protective effect of mindfulness could be especially important for persons with low PMH.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Social Media , Humans , Protective Factors , Mental Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks
20.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 79, 2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139319

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses are frequently exposed to chronic stress in the workplace generating harmful effects such as job strain and burnout. On the contrary, resilience has been shown to be a beneficial variable. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between dimensions of the Job Demand Control-Support model, resilience and burnout in nurses, and examine the mediating role of resilience between job strain and burnout. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional study reported in line with the STROBE guidelines. Active nurses were invited to complete an online questionnaire in September, 2020. With snowball sampling, 1013 nurses, with a mean age of 34.71, filled out the Job Content Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Resilience Scale. RESULTS: The results showed the existence of four groups of professionals based on job strain. The nurses in the "High Strain" group (high demands and low control) showed higher scores in emotional exhaustion and cynicism, while those in the "Active Job" group scored higher in personal realization and resilience. The findings showed that job strain affects burnout in nurses, and this effect is mediated by resilience. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study showed that a high level of resilience could exert a fundamental role in ensuring well-being and proper job performance by nurses. Nursing managers should see to the personable variables or competencies that provide and favor an opportunity for nurses to widen and improve their practice, in pursuance of satisfying and responding better to people's needs and the systems they work for.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Protective Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/psychology
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