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1.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(9)2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684241

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a highly pathogenic virus that evades antiviral immunity by interfering with host protein synthesis, mRNA stability, and protein trafficking. The SARS-CoV-2 nonstructural protein 1 (Nsp1) uses its C-terminal domain to block the messenger RNA (mRNA) entry channel of the 40S ribosome to inhibit host protein synthesis. However, how SARS-CoV-2 circumvents Nsp1-mediated suppression for viral protein synthesis and if the mechanism can be targeted therapeutically remain unclear. Here, we show that N- and C-terminal domains of Nsp1 coordinate to drive a tuned ratio of viral to host translation, likely to maintain a certain level of host fitness while maximizing replication. We reveal that the stem-loop 1 (SL1) region of the SARS-CoV-2 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) is necessary and sufficient to evade Nsp1-mediated translational suppression. Targeting SL1 with locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides inhibits viral translation and makes SARS-CoV-2 5' UTR vulnerable to Nsp1 suppression, hindering viral replication in vitro at a nanomolar concentration, as well as providing protection against SARS-CoV-2-induced lethality in transgenic mice expressing human ACE2. Thus, SL1 allows Nsp1 to switch infected cells from host to SARS-CoV-2 translation, presenting a therapeutic target against COVID-19 that is conserved among immune-evasive variants. This unique strategy of unleashing a virus' own virulence mechanism against itself could force a critical trade-off between drug resistance and pathogenicity.


Subject(s)
5' Untranslated Regions/genetics , Immune Evasion/genetics , Protein Biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Animals , Base Sequence , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immune Evasion/drug effects , Mice, Transgenic , Models, Biological , Oligonucleotides, Antisense/pharmacology , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
2.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24442, 2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1577650

ABSTRACT

Therapeutic interventions targeting viral infections remain a significant challenge for both the medical and scientific communities. While specific antiviral agents have shown success as therapeutics, viral resistance inevitably develops, making many of these approaches ineffective. This inescapable obstacle warrants alternative approaches, such as the targeting of host cellular factors. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the major respiratory pathogen of infants and children worldwide, causes respiratory tract infection ranging from mild upper respiratory tract symptoms to severe life-threatening lower respiratory tract disease. Despite the fact that the molecular biology of the virus, which was originally discovered in 1956, is well described, there is no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment against RSV infection. Here, we demonstrate that targeting host factors, specifically, mTOR signaling, reduces RSV protein production and generation of infectious progeny virus. Further, we show that this approach can be generalizable as inhibition of mTOR kinases reduces coronavirus gene expression, mRNA transcription and protein production. Overall, defining virus replication-dependent host functions may be an effective means to combat viral infections, particularly in the absence of antiviral drugs.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/metabolism , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , A549 Cells , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral/drug effects , Humans , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein/genetics , Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein/metabolism , Regulatory-Associated Protein of mTOR/antagonists & inhibitors , Regulatory-Associated Protein of mTOR/genetics , Regulatory-Associated Protein of mTOR/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/pathology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/drug effects , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics
3.
Antiviral Res ; 197: 105232, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588314

ABSTRACT

We report the in vitro antiviral activity of DZNep (3-Deazaneplanocin A; an inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase) against SARS-CoV-2, besides demonstrating its protective efficacy against lethal infection of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV, a member of the Coronaviridae family). DZNep treatment resulted in reduced synthesis of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and proteins without affecting other steps of viral life cycle. We demonstrated that deposition of N6-methyl adenosine (m6A) in SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the infected cells recruits heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1), an RNA binding protein which serves as a m6A reader. DZNep inhibited the recruitment of hnRNPA1 at m6A-modified SARS-CoV-2 RNA which eventually suppressed the synthesis of the viral genome. In addition, m6A-marked RNA and hnRNPA1 interaction was also shown to regulate early translation to replication switch of SARS-CoV-2 genome. Furthermore, abrogation of methylation by DZNep also resulted in defective synthesis of the 5' cap of viral RNA, thereby resulting in its failure to interact with eIF4E (a cap-binding protein), eventually leading to a decreased synthesis of viral proteins. Most importantly, DZNep-resistant mutants could not be observed upon long-term sequential passage of SARS-CoV-2 in cell culture. In summary, we report the novel role of methylation in the life cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and propose that targeting the methylome using DZNep could be of significant therapeutic value against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Genome, Viral/drug effects , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenosine/pharmacology , Animals , Chick Embryo , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing , DNA Methylation/drug effects , DNA Methylation/physiology , Drug Resistance, Viral/drug effects , Genome, Viral/genetics , Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1/metabolism , Humans , Lethal Dose 50 , Mice , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , RNA, Viral/drug effects , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Rabbits , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Vero Cells
4.
Cell Rep ; 37(2): 109806, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466094

ABSTRACT

Tactical disruption of protein synthesis is an attractive therapeutic strategy, with the first-in-class eIF4A-targeting compound zotatifin in clinical evaluation for cancer and COVID-19. The full cellular impact and mechanisms of these potent molecules are undefined at a proteomic level. Here, we report mass spectrometry analysis of translational reprogramming by rocaglates, cap-dependent initiation disruptors that include zotatifin. We find effects to be far more complex than simple "translational inhibition" as currently defined. Translatome analysis by TMT-pSILAC (tandem mass tag-pulse stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture mass spectrometry) reveals myriad upregulated proteins that drive hitherto unrecognized cytotoxic mechanisms, including GEF-H1-mediated anti-survival RHOA/JNK activation. Surprisingly, these responses are not replicated by eIF4A silencing, indicating a broader translational adaptation than currently understood. Translation machinery analysis by MATRIX (mass spectrometry analysis of active translation factors using ribosome density fractionation and isotopic labeling experiments) identifies rocaglate-specific dependence on specific translation factors including eEF1ε1 that drive translatome remodeling. Our proteome-level interrogation reveals that the complete cellular response to these historical "translation inhibitors" is mediated by comprehensive translational landscape remodeling.


Subject(s)
Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Protein Synthesis Inhibitors/pharmacology , Animals , Benzofurans/pharmacology , Cell Line, Tumor , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-4A/drug effects , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-4A/metabolism , Humans , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred NOD , Primary Cell Culture , Protein Biosynthesis/physiology , Proteomics/methods , Ribosomes/metabolism , Transcriptome/drug effects , Transcriptome/genetics , Triterpenes/pharmacology
5.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5536, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428813

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are important human pathogens for which no specific treatment is available. Here, we provide evidence that pharmacological reprogramming of ER stress pathways can be exploited to suppress CoV replication. The ER stress inducer thapsigargin efficiently inhibits coronavirus (HCoV-229E, MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2) replication in different cell types including primary differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells, (partially) reverses the virus-induced translational shut-down, improves viability of infected cells and counteracts the CoV-mediated downregulation of IRE1α and the ER chaperone BiP. Proteome-wide analyses revealed specific pathways, protein networks and components that likely mediate the thapsigargin-induced antiviral state, including essential (HERPUD1) or novel (UBA6 and ZNF622) factors of ER quality control, and ER-associated protein degradation complexes. Additionally, thapsigargin blocks the CoV-induced selective autophagic flux involving p62/SQSTM1. The data show that thapsigargin hits several central mechanisms required for CoV replication, suggesting that this compound (or derivatives thereof) may be developed into broad-spectrum anti-CoV drugs.


Subject(s)
Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/physiology , Animals , Autophagy/drug effects , Bronchi/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cell Extracts , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/genetics , Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/virology , Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Macrolides/pharmacology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Proteome/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Thapsigargin/pharmacology , Unfolded Protein Response/drug effects , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
6.
Biochemistry ; 60(24): 1869-1875, 2021 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387102

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is an antiviral drug initially designed against the Ebola virus. The results obtained with it both in biochemical studies in vitro and in cell line assays in vivo were very promising, but it proved to be ineffective in clinical trials. Remdesivir exhibited far better efficacy when repurposed against SARS-CoV-2. The chemistry that accounts for this difference is the subject of this study. Here, we examine the hypothesis that remdesivir monophosphate (RMP)-containing RNA functions as a template at the polymerase site for the second run of RNA synthesis, and as mRNA at the decoding center for protein synthesis. Our hypothesis is supported by the observation that RMP can be incorporated into RNA by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) of both viruses, although some of the incorporated RMPs are subsequently removed by exoribonucleases. Furthermore, our hypothesis is consistent with the fact that RdRp of SARS-CoV-2 selects RMP for incorporation over AMP by 3-fold in vitro, and that RMP-added RNA can be rapidly extended, even though primer extension is often paused when the added RMP is translocated at the i + 3 position (with i the nascent base pair at an initial insertion site of RMP) or when the concentrations of the subsequent nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) are below their physiological concentrations. These observations have led to the hypothesis that remdesivir might be a delayed chain terminator. However, that hypothesis is challenged under physiological concentrations of NTPs by the observation that approximately three-quarters of RNA products efficiently overrun the pause.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Ebolavirus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/genetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/genetics , Alanine/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Base Pairing , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , RNA/genetics , RNA/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism
7.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295894

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a key entry point of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus known to induce Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We have recently outlined a concept to reduce ACE2 expression by the administration of glycyrrhizin, a component of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract, via its inhibitory activity on 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11betaHSD2) and resulting activation of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). We hypothesized that in organs such as the ileum, which co-express 11betaHSD2, MR and ACE2, the expression of ACE2 would be suppressed. We studied organ tissues from an experiment originally designed to address the effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract on stress response. Male Sprague Dawley rats were left undisturbed or exposed to chronic mild stress for five weeks. For the last two weeks, animals continued with a placebo diet or received a diet containing extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra root at a dose of 150 mg/kg of body weight/day. Quantitative PCR measurements showed a significant decrease in gene expression of ACE2 in the small intestine of rats fed with diet containing Glycyrrhiza glabra extract. This effect was independent of the stress condition and failed to be observed in non-target tissues, namely the heart and the brain cortex. In the small intestine we also confirmed the reduction of ACE2 at the protein level. Present findings provide evidence to support the hypothesis that Glycyrrhiza glabra extract may reduce an entry point of SARS-CoV-2. Whether this phenomenon, when confirmed in additional studies, is linked to the susceptibility of cells to the virus requires further studies.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dietary Supplements , Glycyrrhiza , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Glycyrrhizic Acid/administration & dosage , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Male , Plant Extracts/administration & dosage , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
8.
Biochemistry ; 60(24): 1869-1875, 2021 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263454

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is an antiviral drug initially designed against the Ebola virus. The results obtained with it both in biochemical studies in vitro and in cell line assays in vivo were very promising, but it proved to be ineffective in clinical trials. Remdesivir exhibited far better efficacy when repurposed against SARS-CoV-2. The chemistry that accounts for this difference is the subject of this study. Here, we examine the hypothesis that remdesivir monophosphate (RMP)-containing RNA functions as a template at the polymerase site for the second run of RNA synthesis, and as mRNA at the decoding center for protein synthesis. Our hypothesis is supported by the observation that RMP can be incorporated into RNA by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) of both viruses, although some of the incorporated RMPs are subsequently removed by exoribonucleases. Furthermore, our hypothesis is consistent with the fact that RdRp of SARS-CoV-2 selects RMP for incorporation over AMP by 3-fold in vitro, and that RMP-added RNA can be rapidly extended, even though primer extension is often paused when the added RMP is translocated at the i + 3 position (with i the nascent base pair at an initial insertion site of RMP) or when the concentrations of the subsequent nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) are below their physiological concentrations. These observations have led to the hypothesis that remdesivir might be a delayed chain terminator. However, that hypothesis is challenged under physiological concentrations of NTPs by the observation that approximately three-quarters of RNA products efficiently overrun the pause.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Ebolavirus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/genetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/genetics , Alanine/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Base Pairing , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , RNA/genetics , RNA/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism
9.
Mol Ther ; 29(3): 1174-1185, 2021 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-985497

ABSTRACT

Self-amplifying RNA (saRNA) is a cutting-edge platform for both nucleic acid vaccines and therapeutics. saRNA is self-adjuvanting, as it activates types I and III interferon (IFN), which enhances the immunogenicity of RNA vaccines but can also lead to inhibition of translation. In this study, we screened a library of saRNA constructs with cis-encoded innate inhibiting proteins (IIPs) and determined the effect on protein expression and immunogenicity. We observed that the PIV-5 V and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) ORF4a proteins enhance protein expression 100- to 500-fold in vitro in IFN-competent HeLa and MRC5 cells. We found that the MERS-CoV ORF4a protein partially abates dose nonlinearity in vivo, and that ruxolitinib, a potent Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) inhibitor, but not the IIPs, enhances protein expression of saRNA in vivo. Both the PIV-5 V and MERS-CoV ORF4a proteins were found to enhance the percentage of resident cells in human skin explants expressing saRNA and completely rescued dose nonlinearity of saRNA. Finally, we observed that the MERS-CoV ORF4a increased the rabies virus (RABV)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and neutralization half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) by ∼10-fold in rabbits, but not in mice or rats. These experiments provide a proof of concept that IIPs can be directly encoded into saRNA vectors and effectively abate the nonlinear dose dependency and enhance immunogenicity.


Subject(s)
Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/pharmacology , Viral Envelope Proteins/administration & dosage , Animals , Cell Line , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/drug effects , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/immunology , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/pathogenicity , Fibroblasts , Gene Expression Regulation , HeLa Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/biosynthesis , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/immunology , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology , Nitriles , Parainfluenza Virus 5/drug effects , Parainfluenza Virus 5/immunology , Parainfluenza Virus 5/pathogenicity , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Pyrimidines , Rabbits , Rabies virus/drug effects , Rabies virus/immunology , Rabies virus/pathogenicity , Rats , STAT Transcription Factors/antagonists & inhibitors , STAT Transcription Factors/genetics , STAT Transcription Factors/immunology , Signal Transduction , Vaccines, Synthetic/biosynthesis , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology
10.
Cell Cycle ; 19(24): 3399-3405, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972502

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes COVID-19. Until now, diverse drugs have been used for the treatment of COVID-19. These drugs are associated with severe side effects, e.g. induction of erythrocyte death, named eryptosis. This massively affects the oxygen (O2) supply of the organism. Therefore, three elementary aspects should be considered simultaneously: (1) a potential drug should directly attack the virus, (2) eliminate virus-infected host cells and (3) preserve erythrocyte survival and functionality. It is known that PKC-α inhibition enhances the vitality of human erythrocytes, while it dose-dependently activates the apoptosis machinery in nucleated cells. Thus, the use of chelerythrine as a specific PKC-alpha and -beta (PKC-α/-ß) inhibitor should be a promising approach to treat people infected with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Benzophenanthridines/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Erythrocytes/immunology , Protein Kinase C beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Protein Kinase C-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Respiratory Tract Diseases/virology , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Apoptosis/drug effects , Benzophenanthridines/adverse effects , Benzophenanthridines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/metabolism , Erythrocytes/drug effects , Erythrocytes/metabolism , Humans , Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1/metabolism , Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2/metabolism , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , RNA Viruses/genetics , RNA Viruses/metabolism , Respiratory Tract Diseases/enzymology , Respiratory Tract Diseases/metabolism
11.
Nature ; 583(7816): 469-472, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-261173

ABSTRACT

A new coronavirus was recently discovered and named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Infection with SARS-CoV-2 in humans causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and has been rapidly spreading around the globe1,2. SARS-CoV-2 shows some similarities to other coronaviruses; however, treatment options and an understanding of how SARS-CoV-2 infects cells are lacking. Here we identify the host cell pathways that are modulated by SARS-CoV-2 and show that inhibition of these pathways prevents viral replication in human cells. We established a human cell-culture model for infection with a clinical isolate of SARS-CoV-2. Using this cell-culture system, we determined the infection profile of SARS-CoV-2 by translatome3 and proteome proteomics at different times after infection. These analyses revealed that SARS-CoV-2 reshapes central cellular pathways such as translation, splicing, carbon metabolism, protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and nucleic acid metabolism. Small-molecule inhibitors that target these pathways prevented viral replication in cells. Our results reveal the cellular infection profile of SARS-CoV-2 and have enabled the identification of drugs that inhibit viral replication. We anticipate that our results will guide efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie the modulation of host cells after infection with SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, our findings provide insights for the development of therapies for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Proteomics , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/growth & development , COVID-19 , Caco-2 Cells , Carbon/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Kinetics , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Proteome/metabolism , Proteostasis , RNA Splicing , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Virus Replication/drug effects
12.
Nature ; 583(7816): 459-468, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-152254

ABSTRACT

A newly described coronavirus named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has infected over 2.3 million people, led to the death of more than 160,000 individuals and caused worldwide social and economic disruption1,2. There are no antiviral drugs with proven clinical efficacy for the treatment of COVID-19, nor are there any vaccines that prevent infection with SARS-CoV-2, and efforts to develop drugs and vaccines are hampered by the limited knowledge of the molecular details of how SARS-CoV-2 infects cells. Here we cloned, tagged and expressed 26 of the 29 SARS-CoV-2 proteins in human cells and identified the human proteins that physically associated with each of the SARS-CoV-2 proteins using affinity-purification mass spectrometry, identifying 332 high-confidence protein-protein interactions between SARS-CoV-2 and human proteins. Among these, we identify 66 druggable human proteins or host factors targeted by 69 compounds (of which, 29 drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, 12 are in clinical trials and 28 are preclinical compounds). We screened a subset of these in multiple viral assays and found two sets of pharmacological agents that displayed antiviral activity: inhibitors of mRNA translation and predicted regulators of the sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors. Further studies of these host-factor-targeting agents, including their combination with drugs that directly target viral enzymes, could lead to a therapeutic regimen to treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Drug Repositioning , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Protein Interaction Maps , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/classification , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cloning, Molecular , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Mass Spectrometry , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Binding , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Protein Domains , Protein Interaction Mapping , Receptors, sigma/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , SKP Cullin F-Box Protein Ligases/metabolism , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/genetics
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