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1.
J Mol Model ; 27(11): 323, 2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525539

ABSTRACT

The world has face the COVID-19 pandemic which has already caused millions of death. Due to the urgency in fighting the virus, we study five residues of free amino acids present in the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S). We investigated the spontaneous interaction between amino acids and silver ions (Ag+), considering these ions as a virucide chemical agent for SARS-CoV-2. The amino acid-Ag+ systems were investigated in a gaseous medium and a simulated water environment was described with a continuum model (PCM) the calculations were performed within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Calculations related to the occupied orbitals of higher energy showed that Ag+ has a tendency to interact with the nitrile groups (-NH). The negative values of the Gibbs free energies show that the interaction process between amino acids-Ag+ in both media occurs spontaneously. There is a decrease in Gibbs free energy from the amino acid-Ag+ interactions immersed in a water solvation simulator.


Subject(s)
Amino Acids/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Density Functional Theory , Silver/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Amino Acids/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Binding Sites , Cations, Monovalent , Gene Expression , Humans , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Silver/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Static Electricity , Thermodynamics
2.
J Virol ; 95(16): e0061721, 2021 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486509

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic of COVID-19 is caused by a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) is the critical determinant of viral tropism and infectivity. To investigate whether naturally occurring RBD mutations during the early transmission phase have altered the receptor binding affinity and infectivity, we first analyzed in silico the binding dynamics between SARS-CoV-2 RBD mutants and the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor. Among 32,123 genomes of SARS-CoV-2 isolates (December 2019 through March 2020), 302 nonsynonymous RBD mutants were identified and clustered into 96 mutant types. The six dominant mutations were analyzed applying molecular dynamics simulations (MDS). The mutant type V367F continuously circulating worldwide displayed higher binding affinity to human ACE2 due to the enhanced structural stabilization of the RBD beta-sheet scaffold. The MDS also indicated that it would be difficult for bat SARS-like CoV to infect humans. However, the pangolin CoV is potentially infectious to humans. The increased infectivity of V367 mutants was further validated by performing receptor-ligand binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), surface plasmon resonance, and pseudotyped virus assays. Phylogenetic analysis of the genomes of V367F mutants showed that during the early transmission phase, most V367F mutants clustered more closely with the SARS-CoV-2 prototype strain than the dual-mutation variants (V367F+D614G), which may derivate from recombination. The analysis of critical RBD mutations provides further insights into the evolutionary trajectory of early SARS-CoV-2 variants of zoonotic origin under negative selection pressure and supports the continuing surveillance of spike mutations to aid in the development of new COVID-19 drugs and vaccines. IMPORTANCE A novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has caused the pandemic of COVID-19. The origin of SARS-CoV-2 was associated with zoonotic infections. The spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) is identified as the critical determinant of viral tropism and infectivity. Thus, whether mutations in the RBD of the circulating SARS-CoV-2 isolates have altered the receptor binding affinity and made them more infectious has been the research hot spot. Given that SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus, the significance of our research is in identifying and validating the RBD mutant types emerging during the early transmission phase and increasing human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor binding affinity and infectivity. Our study provides insights into the evolutionary trajectory of early SARS-CoV-2 variants of zoonotic origin. The continuing surveillance of RBD mutations with increased human ACE2 affinity in human or other animals is critical to the development of new COVID-19 drugs and vaccines against these variants during the sustained COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Gene Expression , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Kinetics , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Phenylalanine/chemistry , Phenylalanine/metabolism , Phylogeny , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thermodynamics , Valine/chemistry , Valine/metabolism , Virulence , Virus Attachment
3.
J Virol ; 95(15): e0046321, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486505

ABSTRACT

The OC43 coronavirus is a human pathogen that usually causes only the common cold. One of its key enzymes, similar to other coronaviruses, is the 2'-O-RNA methyltransferase (MTase), which is essential for viral RNA stability and expression. Here, we report the crystal structure of the 2'-O-RNA MTase in a complex with the pan-methyltransferase inhibitor sinefungin solved at 2.2-Å resolution. The structure reveals an overall fold consistent with the fold observed in other coronaviral MTases. The major differences are in the conformation of the C terminus of the nsp16 subunit and an additional helix in the N terminus of the nsp10 subunits. The structural analysis also revealed very high conservation of the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) binding pocket, suggesting that the SAM pocket is a suitable spot for the design of antivirals effective against all human coronaviruses. IMPORTANCE Some coronaviruses are dangerous pathogens, while some cause only common colds. The reasons are not understood, although the spike proteins probably play an important role. However, to understand the coronaviral biology in sufficient detail, we need to compare the key enzymes from different coronaviruses. We solved the crystal structure of 2'-O-RNA methyltransferase of the OC43 coronavirus, a virus that usually causes mild colds. The structure revealed some differences in the overall fold but also revealed that the SAM binding site is conserved, suggesting that development of antivirals against multiple coronaviruses is feasible.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Methyltransferases/genetics , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Viral Proteins/genetics
4.
J Mol Model ; 27(11): 323, 2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1465873

ABSTRACT

The world has face the COVID-19 pandemic which has already caused millions of death. Due to the urgency in fighting the virus, we study five residues of free amino acids present in the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S). We investigated the spontaneous interaction between amino acids and silver ions (Ag+), considering these ions as a virucide chemical agent for SARS-CoV-2. The amino acid-Ag+ systems were investigated in a gaseous medium and a simulated water environment was described with a continuum model (PCM) the calculations were performed within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Calculations related to the occupied orbitals of higher energy showed that Ag+ has a tendency to interact with the nitrile groups (-NH). The negative values of the Gibbs free energies show that the interaction process between amino acids-Ag+ in both media occurs spontaneously. There is a decrease in Gibbs free energy from the amino acid-Ag+ interactions immersed in a water solvation simulator.


Subject(s)
Amino Acids/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Density Functional Theory , Silver/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Amino Acids/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Binding Sites , Cations, Monovalent , Gene Expression , Humans , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Silver/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Static Electricity , Thermodynamics
5.
Curr Top Med Chem ; 21(16): 1429-1438, 2021 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468281

ABSTRACT

As a part of the efforts to quickly develop pharmaceutical treatments for COVID-19 through repurposing existing drugs, some researchers around the world have combined the recently released crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro in complex with a covalently bonded inhibitor with virtual screening procedures employing molecular docking approaches. In this context, protease inhibitors (PIs) clinically available and currently used to treat infectious diseases, particularly viral ones, are relevant sources of promising drug candidates to inhibit the SARS-CoV-2 Mpro, a key viral enzyme involved in crucial events during its life cycle. In the present perspective, we summarized the published studies showing the promising use of HIV and HCV PIs as potential repurposing drugs against the SARS-CoV-2 Mpro.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus M Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Drug Repositioning , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus M Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus M Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus M Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Kinetics , Models, Molecular , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Thermodynamics
6.
Mol Syst Biol ; 17(9): e10079, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406892

ABSTRACT

We modeled 3D structures of all SARS-CoV-2 proteins, generating 2,060 models that span 69% of the viral proteome and provide details not available elsewhere. We found that ˜6% of the proteome mimicked human proteins, while ˜7% was implicated in hijacking mechanisms that reverse post-translational modifications, block host translation, and disable host defenses; a further ˜29% self-assembled into heteromeric states that provided insight into how the viral replication and translation complex forms. To make these 3D models more accessible, we devised a structural coverage map, a novel visualization method to show what is-and is not-known about the 3D structure of the viral proteome. We integrated the coverage map into an accompanying online resource (https://aquaria.ws/covid) that can be used to find and explore models corresponding to the 79 structural states identified in this work. The resulting Aquaria-COVID resource helps scientists use emerging structural data to understand the mechanisms underlying coronavirus infection and draws attention to the 31% of the viral proteome that remains structurally unknown or dark.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/chemistry , Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/genetics , Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins/chemistry , Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins/genetics , Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Molecular Mimicry , Neuropilin-1/chemistry , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Protein Interaction Mapping/methods , Protein Multimerization , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Matrix Proteins/chemistry , Viral Matrix Proteins/genetics , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism , Viroporin Proteins/chemistry , Viroporin Proteins/genetics , Viroporin Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication
7.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 220, 2020 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387194
8.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 141, 2021 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387322

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses spike (S) glycoproteins mediate viral entry into host cells by binding to host receptors. However, how the S1 subunit undergoes conformational changes for receptor recognition has not been elucidated in Alphacoronavirus. Here, we report the cryo-EM structures of the HCoV-229E S trimer in prefusion state with two conformations. The activated conformation may pose the potential exposure of the S1-RBDs by decreasing of the interaction area between the S1-RBDs and the surrounding S1-NTDs and S1-RBDs compared to the closed conformation. Furthermore, structural comparison of our structures with the previously reported HCoV-229E S structure showed that the S trimers trended to open the S2 subunit from the closed conformation to open conformation, which could promote the transition from pre- to postfusion. Our results provide insights into the mechanisms involved in S glycoprotein-mediated Alphacoronavirus entry and have implications for vaccine and therapeutic antibody design.


Subject(s)
CD13 Antigens/metabolism , Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Cell Line, Tumor , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Humans , Models, Molecular , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Multimerization/physiology , Protein Structure, Quaternary , Protein Subunits/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/ultrastructure
9.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5350-5357, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384240

ABSTRACT

PARP14 and PARP9 play a key role in macrophage immune regulation. SARS-CoV-2 is an emerging viral disease that triggers hyper-inflammation known as a cytokine storm. In this study, using in silico tools, we hypothesize about the immunological phenomena of molecular mimicry between SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 and the human PARP14 and PARP9. The results showed an epitope of SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 protein that contains consensus sequences for both human PARP14 and PARP9 that are antigens for MHC Classes 1 and 2, which can potentially induce an immune response against human PARP14 and PARP9; while its depletion causes a hyper-inflammatory state in SARS-CoV-2 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Neoplasm Proteins/chemistry , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , Consensus Sequence , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/genetics , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Gene Expression , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Mimicry , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Neoplasm Proteins/immunology , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/genetics , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/immunology , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Thermodynamics
10.
Molecules ; 25(19)2020 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389458

ABSTRACT

A novel series of some hydrazones bearing thiazole moiety were generated via solvent-drop grinding of thiazole carbohydrazide 2 with various carbonyl compounds. Also, dehydrative-cyclocondensation of 2 with active methylene compounds or anhydrides gave the respective pyarzole or pyrazine derivatives. The structures of the newly synthesized compounds were established based on spectroscopic evidences and their alternative syntheses. Additionally, the anti-viral activity of all the products was tested against SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) using molecular docking combined with molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The average binding affinities of the compounds 3a, 3b, and 3c (-8.1 ± 0.33 kcal/mol, -8.0 ± 0.35 kcal/mol, and -8.2 ± 0.21 kcal/mol, respectively) are better than that of the positive control Nelfinavir (-6.9 ± 0.51 kcal/mol). This shows the possibility of these three compounds to effectively bind to SARS-CoV-2 Mpro and hence, contradict the virus lifecycle.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Hydrazones/chemical synthesis , Protease Inhibitors/chemical synthesis , Pyrazines/chemical synthesis , Pyrazoles/chemical synthesis , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Binding Sites , COVID-19 , Coronavirus 3C Proteases , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cysteine Endopeptidases/chemistry , Cysteine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Drug Discovery , Humans , Hydrazones/pharmacology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Pyrazines/pharmacology , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thermodynamics , User-Computer Interface , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
11.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(36)2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366850

ABSTRACT

To investigate the evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the immune population, we coincupi bated the authentic virus with a highly neutralizing plasma from a COVID-19 convalescent patient. The plasma fully neutralized the virus for seven passages, but, after 45 d, the deletion of F140 in the spike N-terminal domain (NTD) N3 loop led to partial breakthrough. At day 73, an E484K substitution in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) occurred, followed, at day 80, by an insertion in the NTD N5 loop containing a new glycan sequon, which generated a variant completely resistant to plasma neutralization. Computational modeling predicts that the deletion and insertion in loops N3 and N5 prevent binding of neutralizing antibodies. The recent emergence in the United Kingdom, South Africa, Brazil, and Japan of natural variants with similar changes suggests that SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to escape an effective immune response and that vaccines and antibodies able to control emerging variants should be developed.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Convalescence , Gene Expression , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immune Sera/chemistry , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Neutralization Tests , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Vero Cells
12.
J Am Chem Soc ; 143(33): 13205-13211, 2021 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349637

ABSTRACT

The receptor binding and proteolysis of Spike of SARS-CoV-2 release its S2 subunit to rearrange and catalyze viral-cell fusion. This deploys the fusion peptide for insertion into the cell membranes targeted. We show that this fusion peptide transforms from intrinsic disorder in solution into a wedge-shaped structure inserted in bilayered micelles, according to chemical shifts, 15N NMR relaxation, and NOEs. The globular fold of three helices contrasts the open, extended forms of this region observed in the electron density of compact prefusion states. In the hydrophobic, narrow end of the wedge, helices 1 and 2 contact the fatty acyl chains of phospholipids, according to NOEs and proximity to a nitroxide spin label deep in the membrane mimic. The polar end of the wedge may engage and displace lipid head groups and bind Ca2+ ions for membrane fusion. Polar helix 3 protrudes from the bilayer where it might be accessible to antibodies.


Subject(s)
Micelles , Peptides/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions , Peptides/chemistry , Phospholipids/chemistry , Phospholipids/metabolism , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Subunits/chemistry , Protein Subunits/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
13.
Science ; 373(6559): 1109-1116, 2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341301
14.
Biochim Biophys Acta Biomembr ; 1863(11): 183697, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316392

ABSTRACT

Fusion peptides (FP) are prominent hydrophobic segments of viral fusion proteins that play critical roles in viral entry. FPs interact with and insert into the host lipid membranes, triggering conformational changes in the viral protein that leads to the viral-cell fusion. Multiple membrane-active domains from the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) spike protein have been reported to act as the functional fusion peptide such as the peptide sequence located between the S1/S2 and S2' cleavage sites (FP1), the S2'-adjacent fusion peptide domain (FP2), and the internal FP sequence (cIFP). Using a combined biophysical approach, we demonstrated that the α-helical coiled-coil-forming internal cIFP displayed the highest membrane fusion and permeabilizing activities along with membrane ordering effect in phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidylglycerol (PG) unilamellar vesicles compared to the other two N-proximal fusion peptide counterparts. While the FP1 sequence displayed intermediate membranotropic activities, the well-conserved FP2 peptide was substantially less effective in promoting fusion, leakage, and membrane ordering in PC/PG model membranes. Furthermore, Ca2+ did not enhance the FP2-induced lipid mixing activity in PC/phosphatidylserine/cholesterol lipid membranes, despite its strong erythrocyte membrane perturbation. Nonetheless, we found that the three putative SARS-CoV membrane-active fusion peptide sequences here studied altered the physical properties of model and erythrocyte membranes to different extents. The importance of the distinct membranotropic and biological activities of all SARS-CoV fusion peptide domains and the pronounced effect of the internal fusion peptide sequence to the whole spike-mediated membrane fusion process are discussed.


Subject(s)
Erythrocyte Membrane/metabolism , Phospholipids/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Calcium/chemistry , Calcium/metabolism , Erythrocyte Membrane/chemistry , Humans , Phospholipids/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Domains , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Unilamellar Liposomes/chemistry , Unilamellar Liposomes/metabolism
15.
Arch Virol ; 166(9): 2541-2549, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309045

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 spike protein Q677P/H mutation and furin cleavage site (FCS) have been shown to affect cell tropism and virus transmissibility. Here, we analyzed the frequency of Q677P/H and FCS point mutations in 1,144,793 human and 1042 animal spike protein sequences and from those of the emergent variants B.1.1.7, B.1.351, P.1, B.1.429 + B.1.427, and B.1.525, which were deposited in the database of the GISAID Initiative. Different genetic polymorphisms, particularly P681H and A688V, were detected in the FCS, mainly in human isolates, and otherwise, only pangolin and bat sequences had these mutations. Multiple FCS amino acid deletions such as Δ680SPRRA684 and Δ685RSVA688 were only detected in eight and four human isolates, respectively. Surprisingly, deletion of the entire FCS motif as Δ680SPRRARSVA688 and Δ680SPRRARSVAS689 was detected only in three human isolates. On the other hand, analysis of FCS from emergent variants showed no deletions in the FCS except for spike P681del, which was detected in seven B.1.1.7 isolates from the USA. Spike Q677P was detected only once in variant, B.1.1.7, whereas Q677H was detected in all variants, i.e., B.1.1.7 (n = 1938), B.1.351 (n = 28), P.1 (n = 9), B.1.429 + B.1.427 (n = 132), and B.1.525 (n = 1584). Structural modeling predicted that mutations or deletions at or near the FCS significantly alter the cleavage loop structure and would presumably affect furin binding. Taken together, our results show that Q677H and FCS point mutations are prevalent and may have various biological effects on the circulating variants. Therefore, we recommend urgent monitoring and surveillance of the investigated mutations, as well as laboratory assessment of their pathogenicity and transmissibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Furin/metabolism , Polymorphism, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Chiroptera/virology , Epidemiological Monitoring , Eutheria/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Furin/chemistry , Gene Expression , Humans , Models, Molecular , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Proteolysis , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
16.
Structure ; 29(7): 655-663.e4, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263379

ABSTRACT

Emerging SARS-CoV-2 strains, B.1.1.7 and B.1.351, from the UK and South Africa, respectively, show decreased neutralization by monoclonal antibodies and convalescent or vaccinee sera raised against the original wild-type virus, and are thus of clinical concern. However, the neutralization potency of two antibodies, 1-57 and 2-7, which target the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the spike, was unaffected by these emerging strains. Here, we report cryo-EM structures of 1-57 and 2-7 in complex with spike, revealing each of these antibodies to utilize a distinct mechanism to bypass or accommodate RBD mutations. Notably, each antibody represented an immune response with recognition distinct from those of frequent antibody classes. Moreover, many epitope residues recognized by 1-57 and 2-7 were outside hotspots of evolutionary pressure for ACE2 binding and neutralizing antibody escape. We suggest the therapeutic use of antibodies, such as 1-57 and 2-7, which target less prevalent epitopes, could ameliorate issues of monoclonal antibody escape.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal/genetics , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Binding Sites , Cloning, Molecular , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Epitopes/metabolism , Gene Expression , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/immunology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
17.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 3287, 2021 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253936

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 nsp16/nsp10 enzyme complex modifies the 2'-OH of the first transcribed nucleotide of the viral mRNA by covalently attaching a methyl group to it. The 2'-O methylation of the first nucleotide converts the status of mRNA cap from Cap-0 to Cap-1, and thus, helps the virus evade immune surveillance in host cells. Here, we report two structures of nsp16/nsp10 representing pre- and post-release states of the RNA product (Cap-1). We observe overall widening of the enzyme upon product formation, and an inward twisting motion in the substrate binding region upon product release. These conformational changes reset the enzyme for the next round of catalysis. The structures also identify a unique binding mode and the importance of a divalent metal ion for 2'-O methylation. We also describe underlying structural basis for the perturbed enzymatic activity of a clinical variant of SARS-CoV-2, and a previous SARS-CoV outbreak strain.


Subject(s)
Magnesium/chemistry , RNA Caps/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , Biocatalysis , Cloning, Molecular , Crystallography, X-Ray , Escherichia coli/genetics , Escherichia coli/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Humans , Magnesium/metabolism , Methylation , Methyltransferases , Models, Molecular , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , RNA Caps/chemistry , RNA Caps/genetics , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , S-Adenosylmethionine/chemistry , S-Adenosylmethionine/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Substrate Specificity , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/genetics
18.
J Virol ; 95(15): e0046321, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236419

ABSTRACT

The OC43 coronavirus is a human pathogen that usually causes only the common cold. One of its key enzymes, similar to other coronaviruses, is the 2'-O-RNA methyltransferase (MTase), which is essential for viral RNA stability and expression. Here, we report the crystal structure of the 2'-O-RNA MTase in a complex with the pan-methyltransferase inhibitor sinefungin solved at 2.2-Å resolution. The structure reveals an overall fold consistent with the fold observed in other coronaviral MTases. The major differences are in the conformation of the C terminus of the nsp16 subunit and an additional helix in the N terminus of the nsp10 subunits. The structural analysis also revealed very high conservation of the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) binding pocket, suggesting that the SAM pocket is a suitable spot for the design of antivirals effective against all human coronaviruses. IMPORTANCE Some coronaviruses are dangerous pathogens, while some cause only common colds. The reasons are not understood, although the spike proteins probably play an important role. However, to understand the coronaviral biology in sufficient detail, we need to compare the key enzymes from different coronaviruses. We solved the crystal structure of 2'-O-RNA methyltransferase of the OC43 coronavirus, a virus that usually causes mild colds. The structure revealed some differences in the overall fold but also revealed that the SAM binding site is conserved, suggesting that development of antivirals against multiple coronaviruses is feasible.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Methyltransferases/genetics , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Viral Proteins/genetics
19.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5350-5357, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206838

ABSTRACT

PARP14 and PARP9 play a key role in macrophage immune regulation. SARS-CoV-2 is an emerging viral disease that triggers hyper-inflammation known as a cytokine storm. In this study, using in silico tools, we hypothesize about the immunological phenomena of molecular mimicry between SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 and the human PARP14 and PARP9. The results showed an epitope of SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 protein that contains consensus sequences for both human PARP14 and PARP9 that are antigens for MHC Classes 1 and 2, which can potentially induce an immune response against human PARP14 and PARP9; while its depletion causes a hyper-inflammatory state in SARS-CoV-2 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Neoplasm Proteins/chemistry , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , Consensus Sequence , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/genetics , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Gene Expression , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Mimicry , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Neoplasm Proteins/immunology , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/genetics , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/immunology , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Thermodynamics
20.
Mol Cell ; 81(12): 2656-2668.e8, 2021 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179919

ABSTRACT

A deficient interferon (IFN) response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has been implicated as a determinant of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To identify the molecular effectors that govern IFN control of SARS-CoV-2 infection, we conducted a large-scale gain-of-function analysis that evaluated the impact of human IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) on viral replication. A limited subset of ISGs were found to control viral infection, including endosomal factors inhibiting viral entry, RNA binding proteins suppressing viral RNA synthesis, and a highly enriched cluster of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/Golgi-resident ISGs inhibiting viral assembly/egress. These included broad-acting antiviral ISGs and eight ISGs that specifically inhibited SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV-1 replication. Among the broad-acting ISGs was BST2/tetherin, which impeded viral release and is antagonized by SARS-CoV-2 Orf7a protein. Overall, these data illuminate a set of ISGs that underlie innate immune control of SARS-CoV-2/SARS-CoV-1 infection, which will facilitate the understanding of host determinants that impact disease severity and offer potential therapeutic strategies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factors/genetics , Interferon Type I/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics , Animals , Antigens, CD/chemistry , Antigens, CD/immunology , Binding Sites , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Endoplasmic Reticulum/genetics , Endoplasmic Reticulum/immunology , Endoplasmic Reticulum/virology , GPI-Linked Proteins/chemistry , GPI-Linked Proteins/genetics , GPI-Linked Proteins/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation , Golgi Apparatus/genetics , Golgi Apparatus/immunology , Golgi Apparatus/virology , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Regulatory Factors/classification , Interferon Regulatory Factors/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/immunology , Virus Internalization , Virus Release/genetics , Virus Release/immunology , Virus Replication/genetics , Virus Replication/immunology
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