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1.
Cancer Cell ; 40(1): 3-5, 2022 01 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517077

ABSTRACT

Anti-COVID-19 immunity dynamics were assessed in patients with cancer in a prospective clinical trial. Waning of immunity was detected 4-6 months post-vaccination with significant increases in anti-spike IgG titers after booster dosing, and 56% of seronegative patients seroconverted post-booster vaccination. Prior anti-CD20/BTK inhibitor therapy was associated with reduced vaccine efficacy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunization, Secondary , Immunoglobulin G/biosynthesis , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Prospective Studies , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Rituximab/adverse effects , Rituximab/therapeutic use , Seroconversion , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination
2.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 22(5): 693-707, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pivotal phase III studies demonstrated that abrocitinib, an oral, once-daily, JAK1-selective inhibitor, is effective treatment for moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD) as monotherapy and in combination with topical therapy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term safety of abrocitinib 200 mg and 100 mg in an integrated analysis of a phase IIb study, four phase III studies, and one long-term extension study. METHODS: Two cohorts were analyzed: a placebo-controlled cohort from 12- to 16-week studies and an all-abrocitinib cohort including patients who received one or more abrocitinib doses. Adverse events (AEs) of interest and laboratory data are reported. RESULTS: Total exposure in the all-abrocitinib cohort (n = 2856) was 1614 patient-years (PY); exposure was ≥ 24 weeks in 1248 patients and ≥ 48 weeks in 606 (maximum 108 weeks). In the placebo-controlled cohort (n = 1540), dose-related AEs (200 mg, 100 mg, placebo) were nausea (14.6%, 6.1%, 2.0%), headache (7.8%, 5.9%, 3.5%), and acne (4.7%, 1.6%, 0%). Platelet count was reduced transiently in a dose-dependent manner; 2/2718 patients (200-mg group) had confirmed platelet counts of < 50 × 103/mm3 at week 4. Incidence rates (IRs) were 2.33/100PY and 2.65/100 PY for serious infection, 4.34/100PY and 2.04/100PY for herpes zoster, and 11.83/100PY and 8.73/100PY for herpes simplex in the 200-mg and 100-mg groups, respectively. IRs for nonmelanoma skin cancer, other malignancies, and major adverse cardiovascular events were < 0.5/100PY for both doses. Five venous thromboembolism events occurred (IR 0.30/100PY), all in the 200-mg group. There were three deaths due to gastric carcinoma (diagnosed at day 43), sudden death, and COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Abrocitinib, with proper patient and dose selection, has a manageable tolerability and longer-term safety profile appropriate for long-term use in patients with moderate-to-severe AD. TRIAL REGISTRIES: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02780167, NCT03349060, NCT03575871, NCT03720470, NCT03627767, NCT03422822.


Subject(s)
Dermatitis, Atopic/drug therapy , Infections/epidemiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrimidines/adverse effects , Skin Neoplasms/epidemiology , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Acne Vulgaris/chemically induced , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Female , Headache/chemically induced , Herpes Simplex/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/chemically induced , Platelet Count , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Risk Factors , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Time Factors , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Young Adult
3.
Expert Rev Hematol ; 14(9): 819-830, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349725

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Ibrutinib is a highly effective drug for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and is well tolerated even by older patients and those unfit to receive conventional immuno-chemotherapy. AREAS COVERED: The occurrence of adverse events was revealed as a major cause of ibrutinib failure in the real-world. Ibrutinib-induced lymphocytosis carries the risk of an untimely interruption of therapy because it may be misinterpreted as disease progression. In addition, drug interactions can worsen ibrutinib-associated toxicities by increasing the plasma concentration of ibrutinib. In this review, we present a case of major hemorrhage and atrial fibrillation (AF) during ibrutinib use and summarize the adverse events associated with ibrutinib. Furthermore, the practical management of ibrutinib-associated toxicities was covered with reference to a drug interaction mechanism. EXPERT OPINION: Clinicians should examine the prescribed drugs prior to ibrutinib initiation and carefully monitor toxicities while taking ibrutinib. A reduced dose of ibrutinib with the concurrent use of CYP3A inhibitors such as antifungal agents could be an attractive strategy to reduce toxicities and may confer financial benefits. Reducing unexpected toxicities is as significant as achieving treatment response in the era of life-long therapy with ibrutinib in patients with CLL.


Subject(s)
Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/drug therapy , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Adenine/adverse effects , Adenine/pharmacology , Adenine/therapeutic use , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Disease Management , Drug Interactions , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/etiology , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/therapy , Humans , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/complications , Male , Piperidines/adverse effects , Piperidines/pharmacology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304662

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, on red blood cell parameters in the context of iron homeostasis in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and evaluate its effect on cell size in vitro. Everolimus has a significant impact on red blood cell parameters in patients with TSC. The most common alteration was microcytosis. The mean MCV value decreased by 9.2%, 12%, and 11.8% after 3, 6, and 12 months of everolimus treatment. The iron level declined during the first 3 months, and human soluble transferrin receptor concentration increased during 6 months of therapy. The size of K562 cells decreased when cultured in the presence of 5 µM everolimus by approximately 8%. The addition of hemin to the cell culture with 5 µM everolimus did not prevent any decrease in cell size. The stage of erythroid maturation did not affect the response to everolimus. Our results showed that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus caused red blood cell microcytosis in vivo and in vitro. This effect is not clearly related to a deficit of iron and erythroid maturation. This observation confirms that mTOR signaling plays a complex role in the control of cell size.


Subject(s)
Cell Size/drug effects , Erythrocytes/drug effects , Erythrocytes/pathology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Adolescent , Biomarkers , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cell Line , Child , Child, Preschool , Erythrocyte Indices , Erythrocytes/metabolism , Everolimus/administration & dosage , Everolimus/adverse effects , Everolimus/pharmacology , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Iron/metabolism , K562 Cells , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects
5.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(9): 957-968, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275790

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The major complication of COVID-19 is hypoxaemic respiratory failure from capillary leak and alveolar oedema. Experimental and early clinical data suggest that the tyrosine-kinase inhibitor imatinib reverses pulmonary capillary leak. METHODS: This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was done at 13 academic and non-academic teaching hospitals in the Netherlands. Hospitalised patients (aged ≥18 years) with COVID-19, as confirmed by an RT-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2, requiring supplemental oxygen to maintain a peripheral oxygen saturation of greater than 94% were eligible. Patients were excluded if they had severe pre-existing pulmonary disease, had pre-existing heart failure, had undergone active treatment of a haematological or non-haematological malignancy in the previous 12 months, had cytopenia, or were receiving concomitant treatment with medication known to strongly interact with imatinib. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either oral imatinib, given as a loading dose of 800 mg on day 0 followed by 400 mg daily on days 1-9, or placebo. Randomisation was done with a computer-based clinical data management platform with variable block sizes (containing two, four, or six patients), stratified by study site. The primary outcome was time to discontinuation of mechanical ventilation and supplemental oxygen for more than 48 consecutive hours, while being alive during a 28-day period. Secondary outcomes included safety, mortality at 28 days, and the need for invasive mechanical ventilation. All efficacy and safety analyses were done in all randomised patients who had received at least one dose of study medication (modified intention-to-treat population). This study is registered with the EU Clinical Trials Register (EudraCT 2020-001236-10). FINDINGS: Between March 31, 2020, and Jan 4, 2021, 805 patients were screened, of whom 400 were eligible and randomly assigned to the imatinib group (n=204) or the placebo group (n=196). A total of 385 (96%) patients (median age 64 years [IQR 56-73]) received at least one dose of study medication and were included in the modified intention-to-treat population. Time to discontinuation of ventilation and supplemental oxygen for more than 48 h was not significantly different between the two groups (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0·95 [95% CI 0·76-1·20]). At day 28, 15 (8%) of 197 patients had died in the imatinib group compared with 27 (14%) of 188 patients in the placebo group (unadjusted HR 0·51 [0·27-0·95]). After adjusting for baseline imbalances between the two groups (sex, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease) the HR for mortality was 0·52 (95% CI 0·26-1·05). The HR for mechanical ventilation in the imatinib group compared with the placebo group was 1·07 (0·63-1·80; p=0·81). The median duration of invasive mechanical ventilation was 7 days (IQR 3-13) in the imatinib group compared with 12 days (6-20) in the placebo group (p=0·0080). 91 (46%) of 197 patients in the imatinib group and 82 (44%) of 188 patients in the placebo group had at least one grade 3 or higher adverse event. The safety evaluation revealed no imatinib-associated adverse events. INTERPRETATION: The study failed to meet its primary outcome, as imatinib did not reduce the time to discontinuation of ventilation and supplemental oxygen for more than 48 consecutive hours in patients with COVID-19 requiring supplemental oxygen. The observed effects on survival (although attenuated after adjustment for baseline imbalances) and duration of mechanical ventilation suggest that imatinib might confer clinical benefit in hospitalised patients with COVID-19, but further studies are required to validate these findings. FUNDING: Amsterdam Medical Center Foundation, Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek/ZonMW, and the European Union Innovative Medicines Initiative 2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Imatinib Mesylate/administration & dosage , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Capillary Permeability/drug effects , Combined Modality Therapy/adverse effects , Combined Modality Therapy/methods , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Placebos/administration & dosage , Placebos/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
6.
Acta Haematol ; 144(6): 620-626, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263968

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Currently, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection is a major public health problem worldwide. Although most patients present a mild infection, effective strategies are required for patients who develop the severe disease. Anti-inflammatory treatment with JAK inhibitors has been considered in SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: In this study, we presented our experience in a group of severe SARS-CoV-2 Chilean patients. This prospective study was performed on consecutive patients presenting severe respiratory failure owing to COVID-19 or high-risk clinical condition associated with SARS-CoV-2, and who were treated with ruxolitinib for management of associated inflammation. Overall, 18 patients presenting SARS-CoV-2 viral-induced hyperinflammation were treated with ruxolitinib, with 16 patients previously treated with steroids, 4 with tocilizumab, and 3 with both treatments. RESULTS: Ten patients evolved with favorable response, including 7 patients admitted with severe respiratory failure (PaFi less than 200 mm Hg in high-flow nasal cannula), presenting complete regression of hyperinflammation, regression of the lung lesions, and subsequent discharge. In the remaining 8 patients, 25% showed reduced inflammation, but early discharge was not achieved owing to the slow evolution of respiratory failure. Unfortunately, 3 patients demonstrated a severe respiratory failure. The early initiation of ruxolitinib was found to be associated with better clinical evolution (p < 0.005). CONCLUSION: In this study, ruxolitinib resolved hyperinflammatory state in 55% of the patients, regardless of the previous steroid or tocilizumab therapy. Unfortunately, few patients demonstrated severe evolution despite ruxolitinib therapy. Notably, the treatment starting time appears to play an important role in achieving good outcomes. Further validation in randomized controlled trials is crucial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/drug therapy , Nitriles/therapeutic use , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chile , Female , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nitriles/adverse effects , Prospective Studies , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrimidines/adverse effects , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Steroids/therapeutic use , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Treatment Outcome
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 3847, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242037

ABSTRACT

Ruxolitinib is the first janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK2 inhibitor that was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) agency for the treatment of myeloproliferative neoplasms. The drug targets the JAK/STAT signalling pathway, which is critical in regulating the gliogenesis process during nervous system development. In the study, we assessed the effect of non-maternal toxic dosages of ruxolitinib (0-30 mg/kg/day between E7.5-E20.5) on the brain of the developing mouse embryos. While the pregnant mice did not show any apparent adverse effects, the Gfap protein marker for glial cells and S100ß mRNA marker for astrocytes were reduced in the postnatal day (P) 1.5 pups' brains. Gfap expression and Gfap+ cells were also suppressed in the differentiating neurospheres culture treated with ruxolitinib. Compared to the control group, adult mice treated with ruxolitinib prenatally showed no changes in motor coordination, locomotor function, and recognition memory. However, increased explorative behaviour within an open field and improved spatial learning and long-term memory retention were observed in the treated group. We demonstrated transplacental effects of ruxolitinib on astrogenesis, suggesting the potential use of ruxolitinib to revert pathological conditions caused by gliogenic-shift in early brain development such as Down and Noonan syndromes.


Subject(s)
Astrocytes/drug effects , Learning/drug effects , Maternal Exposure , Memory/drug effects , Neurogenesis/drug effects , Nitriles/administration & dosage , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Age Factors , Animals , Astrocytes/metabolism , Behavior, Animal/drug effects , Biomarkers , Female , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Male , Maternal Exposure/adverse effects , Mice , Neurogenesis/genetics , Nitriles/adverse effects , Organ Specificity/drug effects , Pregnancy , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrimidines/adverse effects
11.
Mol Cancer Res ; 19(4): 549-554, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058113

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as one of the biggest global health threats worldwide. As of October 2020, more than 44 million confirmed cases and more than 1,160,000 deaths have been reported globally, and the toll is likely to be much higher before the pandemic is over. There are currently little therapeutic options available and new potential targets are intensively investigated. Recently, Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) has emerged as an interesting candidate. Elevated levels of BTK activity have been reported in blood monocytes from patients with severe COVID-19, compared with those from healthy volunteers. Importantly, various studies confirmed empirically that administration of BTK inhibitors (acalabrutinib and ibrutinib) decreased the duration of mechanical ventilation and mortality rate for hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. Herein, we review the current information regarding the role of BTK in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infections and the suitability of its inhibitors as drugs to treat COVID-19. The use of BTK inhibitors in the management of COVID-19 shows promise in reducing the severity of the immune response to the infection and thus mortality. However, BTK inhibition may be contributing in other ways to inhibit the effects of the virus and this will need to be carefully studied.


Subject(s)
Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Adenine/pharmacology , Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Benzamides/pharmacology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/enzymology , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/virology , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/virology , Piperidines/pharmacology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyrazines/pharmacology , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/virology
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(1)2020 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006950

ABSTRACT

Nintedanib is a synthetic orally active tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whose main action is to inhibit the receptors of the platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor families. The drug also affects other kinases, including Src, Flt-3, LCK, LYN. Nintedanib is used in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic fibrosing interstitial lung diseases and lung cancer. The mechanism of action suggests that nintedanib should be considered one of the potential agents for inhibiting and revising the fibrosis process related to COVID-19 infections. Due to the known induction of coagulation pathways during COVID-19 infections, possible interaction between nintedanib and anticoagulant seems to be an extremely important issue. In theory, nintedanib could increase the bleeding risk, thrombosis and lead to thrombocytopenia. The data from clinical trials on the concomitant use of nintedanib and antithrombotic agents is very limited as this patient group was within the standard exclusion criteria. Nintedanib is an important therapeutic option, despite its interaction with anticoagulants. If anticoagulant therapy is necessary, the more effective and safer option is the concomitant administration of DOACs and nintedanib, especially when drug-monitored therapy will be used in patients at high risk of bleeding complications.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/pharmacology , Hemorrhage/etiology , Indoles/pharmacology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antidotes/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/complications , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Interactions , Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Humans , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Indoles/adverse effects , Indoles/therapeutic use , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Risk Factors
13.
Cell Cycle ; 19(24): 3399-3405, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972502

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes COVID-19. Until now, diverse drugs have been used for the treatment of COVID-19. These drugs are associated with severe side effects, e.g. induction of erythrocyte death, named eryptosis. This massively affects the oxygen (O2) supply of the organism. Therefore, three elementary aspects should be considered simultaneously: (1) a potential drug should directly attack the virus, (2) eliminate virus-infected host cells and (3) preserve erythrocyte survival and functionality. It is known that PKC-α inhibition enhances the vitality of human erythrocytes, while it dose-dependently activates the apoptosis machinery in nucleated cells. Thus, the use of chelerythrine as a specific PKC-alpha and -beta (PKC-α/-ß) inhibitor should be a promising approach to treat people infected with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Benzophenanthridines/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Erythrocytes/immunology , Protein Kinase C beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Protein Kinase C-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Respiratory Tract Diseases/virology , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Apoptosis/drug effects , Benzophenanthridines/adverse effects , Benzophenanthridines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/metabolism , Erythrocytes/drug effects , Erythrocytes/metabolism , Humans , Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1/metabolism , Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2/metabolism , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , RNA Viruses/genetics , RNA Viruses/metabolism , Respiratory Tract Diseases/enzymology , Respiratory Tract Diseases/metabolism
14.
Blood ; 137(2): 185-189, 2021 01 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-953565

ABSTRACT

Vaccinations are effective in preventing infections; however, it is unknown if patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who are treatment naïve (TN) or receiving Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitors (BTKi's) respond to novel adjuvanted vaccines. Understanding the effect of BTKi's on humoral immunity is timely because BTKi's are widely used and vaccination against coronavirus disease 2019 is urgently needed. In 2 open-label, single-arm clinical trials, we measured the effect of BTKi's on de novo immune response against recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (HepB-CpG) and recall response against recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) in CLL patients who were TN or on BTKi. The primary end point was serologic response to HepB-CpG (anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies ≥10 mIU/mL) and RZV (≥fourfold increase in anti-glycoprotein E). The response rate to HepB-CpG was lower in patients on BTKi (3.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-18.9) than patients who were TN (28.1%; 95% CI, 15.6-45.4; P = .017). In contrast, the response rate to RZV did not differ significantly between the BTKi (41.5%; 95% CI, 27.8-56.6) and TN cohorts (59.1%; 95% CI, 38.7-76.7; P = .2). BTKi's were associated with a decreased de novo immune response following HepB-CpG, whereas recall immune response following RZV was not significantly affected by BTKi therapy. These trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT03685708 (Hep-CpG) and #NCT03702231 (RZV).


Subject(s)
Hepatitis B Vaccines/immunology , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/immunology , Immunity , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/immunology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Aged , Female , Humans , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/drug therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Outcome Assessment , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Vaccination
15.
Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi ; 23(10): 858-865, 2020 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-914583

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anlotinib is a newly developed small molecule multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor that was approved for the treatment of patients with lung cancer in China. We aim to report 3 cases of rare complication of anlotinib-bronchial fistula (BF) during the treatment of lung cancer patients and summarize the possible causes. METHODS: We collected three patients who developed BF due to anlotinib treatment, and conducted a search of Medline and PubMed for medical literature published between 2018 and 2020 using the following search terms: "anlotinib," "lung cancer," and "fistula." RESULTS: Our literature search produced two case reports (three patients) which, in addition to our three patients. We collated the patients' clinical characteristics including demographic information, cancer type, imaging features, treatment received, risk factors for anlotinib related BF, and treatment-related outcomes. The six patients shared some common characteristics: advanced age, male, concurrent infection symptoms, diabetes mellitus (DM), advanced squamous cell and small cell lung cancers, centrally located tumors, tumor measuring ≥5 cm in longest diameter, and newly formed tumor cavitation after multi-line treatment especially after receiving radiotherapy. Fistula types included broncho-pericardial fistula, broncho-pleural fistula, and esophago-tracheobronchial fistula. Six patients all died within 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: Although anlotinib is relatively safe, it is still necessary to pay attention to the occurrence of BF, a rare treatment side effect that threatens the quality of life and overall survival of patients. Anlotinib, therefore, requires selective use and close observation of high-risk patients.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Bronchial Fistula/etiology , Indoles/adverse effects , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Quinolines/adverse effects , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Bronchial Fistula/diagnostic imaging , China , Humans , Indoles/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Quinolines/therapeutic use
16.
Trials ; 21(1): 897, 2020 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895023

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Primary Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral administration of imatinib combined with the Best Conventional Care (BCC) versus placebo plus BCC in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. HYPOTHESIS: Addition of imatinib to the BCC will provide a superior clinical outcome for patients with COVID-19 compared with BCC plus placebo. This hypothesis is on the basis of 1) intralysosomal entrapment of imatinib will increase endosomal pH and effectively decrease SARS-CoV-2/cell fusion, 2) kinase inhibitory activity of imatinib will interfere with budding/release or replication of SARS-CoV-2, and 3) because of the critical role of mechanical ventilation in the care of patients with ARDS, imatinib will have a significant clinical impact for patients with critical COVID-19 infection in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). TRIAL DESIGN: This is an individual patient-level randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-parallel arm phase 3 study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of imatinib for the treatment of hospitalized adults with COVID-19. Participants will be followed for up to 60 days from the start of study drug administration. This trial will be conducted in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki and the Good Clinical Practice guidelines of the International Conference on Harmonization. PARTICIPANTS: Inclusion Criteria: Patients may be included in the study only if they meet all of the following criteria: 1) Ability to understand and willingness to sign a written informed consent document. Informed consent must be obtained prior to participation in the study. For patients who are too unwell to provide consent such as patients on invasive ventilator or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), their Legally Authorized Representative (LAR) can sign the informed consent, 2) Hospitalized patients ≥18 years of age, 3) Positive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for SARS-CoV-2 in the respiratory tract sample (oropharyngeal, nasopharyngeal or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)) by Center for Disease Control or local laboratory within 7 days of randomization, 4) Women of childbearing potential must agree to use at least one primary form of contraception for the duration of the study. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients meeting any of the following criteria are not eligible for the study: 1) Patients receiving any other investigational agents in a clinical trial. Off-label use of agents such as hydroxychloroquine is not an exclusion criterion, 2) Pregnant or breastfeeding women, 3) Patients with significant liver or renal dysfunction at the time of screening as defined as: 3.1) Direct bilirubin >2.5 mg/dL, 3.2) AST, ALT, or alkaline phosphatase >5x upper limit of normal, 3.3) eGFR ≤30 mL/min or requiring renal replacement therapy, 4) Patients with significant hematologic disorder at screen as defined as: 4.1) Absolute neutrophil count (ANC) <500/µL, 4.2) Platelet <20,000/µL, 4.3) Hemoglobin <7 g/dL, 5) Uncontrolled underlying illness including, but not limited to, symptomatic congestive heart failure, unstable angina pectoris, uncontrolled active seizure disorder, or psychiatric illness/social situations that per site Principal Investigator's judgment would limit compliance with study requirements, 6) Known allergy to imatinib or its component products, 7) Any other clinical conditions that in the opinion of the investigator would make the subject unsuitable for the study. Both men and women of all races and ethnic groups are eligible for this trial. University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD is the initiating site. The study may be opened in other centers on the basis of the accrual rate or the magnitude of the COVID-19 pandemic. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Imatinib: All doses of imatinib should be administered with a meal and a large glass of water. Imatinib can be dissolved in water or apple juice for patients having difficulty swallowing. In this study, patients with confirmed positive COVID-19 tests receive imatinib for a total of 14 days; 400 mg orally daily Days 1-14. Imatinib 400 mg tablets will be encapsulated using size 000 capsules and cellulose microcrystalline filler. For patients on ventilator or ECMO, imatinib will be given as oral suspension (40 mg/mL). To make the oral suspension, imatinib tablets will be crushed and mixed in Ora-sweet solution to yield a concentration of 40 mg/mL suspension by pharmacy. Additionally, in the absence of supportive microbiological testing results, we confirm that the in-use stability period for the prepared imatinib suspensions will be 24 hours at room temperature or 7 days at refrigerated conditions. The pharmacy staff will follow the American Society Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) guidelines for handling hazardous drugs. Placebo: The matching placebo will be packaged by Investigational Drug Service Pharmacy at University of Maryland Medical Center. The placebos will be prepared using size 000 capsules and cellulose microcrystalline filler. Imatinib 400 mg capsules and placebo capsules will be identical form and color. For patients on ventilator or ECMO, placebo will be given as oral suspension with similar process for making imatinib suspension. Concomitant Medications/supportive care: In both arms, patients can receive concomitant available local standard of care antipyretics, antibacterials, antivirals, antifungals and anti-inflammatory including hydroxychloroquine at the discretion of the treating physician as necessary. For other drug-drug interactions particularly with CYP P450, the treating physician should consider the risk and benefit of drug administration based on available information. Co-administration of off-label immunomodulatory treatments for COVID-19 including but not limited to corticosteroids, sarilumab, clazakizumab, tocilizumab, and anakinra will be allowed but may affect interpretability of study outcomes. The timing, dosing, and duration of these treatments will be meticulously collected, including any of these treatments that may be used for participants who experience progression of COVID-19 disease after study enrollment. Two analyses will be performed, the primary analysis will compare the primary endpoint in the two trial arms irrespective of any other treatment; the second analysis will be stratified for co-administration of immunomodulatory drugs. MAIN OUTCOMES: The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients with a two-point improvement at Day 14 from baseline using the 8-category ordinal scale. The ordinal scale is an evaluation of the clinical status at the first assessment of a given study day. The scale is as follows: 1) Not hospitalized, no limitations on activities; 2) Not hospitalized, limitation on activities and/or requiring home oxygen; 3) Hospitalized, not requiring supplemental oxygen - no longer requires ongoing medical care; 4) Hospitalized, not requiring supplemental oxygen - requiring ongoing medical care (COVID-19 related or otherwise); 5) Hospitalized, requiring supplemental oxygen; 6) Hospitalized, on non-invasive ventilation or high flow oxygen devices; 7) Hospitalized, on invasive mechanical ventilation or ECMO; 8) Death. The secondary endpoints include: All-cause mortality at Day 28, All-cause mortality at Day 60, Time to a 2-point clinical improvement difference over baseline, Duration of hospitalization, Duration of ECMO or invasive mechanical ventilation (for subjects who are on ECMO or mechanical ventilation at Day 1), Duration of ICU stay (for subjects who are in ICU at Day 1), Time to SARS-CoV-2 negative by RT-PCR, Proportion of patients with negative oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR on days 5, 10, 14, 21, and 28 after starting treatment, Proportion of subjects with serious adverse events, Proportion of subjects who discontinue study drug due to adverse events. The exploratory endpoints include: Determine the impact of treatment arms on IL-6 levels, Obtain blood/peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) for storage to look at transcriptomics in severe disease, Association of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) with severity of illness, Mean change in the ordinal scale from baseline, Time to an improvement of one category from admission using an ordinal scale, Duration of hospitalization, Duration of new oxygen use, Number of oxygenation free days, Duration of new mechanical ventilation, Number of ventilator free days. RANDOMIZATION: Eligible patients will be uniformly randomized in 1:1 ratio to receive either imatinib or placebo for 14 days. Both groups will receive the BCC. The randomized treatment allocations use stratified, permuted block randomization with a variable block size; blocks are generated using a validated random number generator. In order to balance the severity of the respiratory illness between the two arms, randomization will be stratified based on radiographic findings and oxygen requirements: 1) Severe disease: evidence of pneumonia on chest X-ray or CT scan OR chest auscultation (rales, crackles), and SpO2 ≤92% on ambient air or PaO2/FiO2 <300 mmHg, and requires supplemental oxygen administration by nasal cannula, simple face mask, or other similar oxygen delivery device; 2) Critical disease: requires supplemental oxygen delivered by non-rebreather mask or high flow cannula OR use of invasive or non-invasive ventilation OR requiring treatment in an intensive care unit, use of vasopressors, extracorporeal life support, or renal replacement therapy. BLINDING (MASKING): The participants, caregivers, and the statistician are blinded to group assignment. The only people who are not blinded are Site Pharmacists. Blinding will be performed via a specific randomization process. Centralized, concealed randomization will be executed by the Primary Site's Pharmacist. Data on eligible consented cases will be submittedelectronically on the appropriate on-study form to the pharmacy, where the patient is randomized to imatinib or placebo. Imatinib 400 mg capsules and placebo capsules will be identical form and color. For patients on ventilator or ECMO, placebo will be given as oral suspension with similar process for making imatinib suspension. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMIZED (SAMPLE SIZE): The trial is designed as a double-blind, two-parallel arm, randomized controlled trial with a uniform (1:1) allocation ratio to: Arm A) Imatinib or Arm B) Placebo. Patients in both arms will receive the BCC per local institutional standards at the discretion of the treating physician. Group sample sizes of 102 in Arm A and 102 in Arm B achieve 80.6% power to detect a difference between the group proportions of 0.20. The proportion in Arm A (imatinib treatment arm) is assumed to be 0.30 under the null hypothesis and 0.50 under the alternative hypothesis. The proportion in Arm B (placebo control arm) is 0.30. The test statistic used is the two-sided Fisher's Exact Test. The significance level of the test is targeted at 0.05. The significance level actually achieved by this design is α=0.0385. The power of the test is calculated using binomial enumeration of all possible outcomes. The primary analysis will be conducted using an intention to treat principle (ITT) for participants who at least receive one dose of study drug or placebo. The sample size is not inflated for dropouts. All patients will be evaluable irrespective of the clinical course of their disease. TRIAL STATUS: Current protocol version is 1.2 from May 8, 2020. The recruitment started on June 15, 2020 and is ongoing. We originally anticipated that the trial would finish recruitment by mid 2021. We are aware of the enrollment requirement of approximately 200 patients, which is required to provide scientific integrity of the results. We are also aware of the fact that enrolling this number of patients in a single-site at University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) may take longer than expected, particularly taken into account other competing studies. For this reason, we are actively considering opening the protocol in other sites. After identification of other sites, we will fulfill all regulatory requirements before opening the protocol in other sites. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04394416 . First Posted: May 19, 2020; Last Update Posted: June 4, 2020. FDA has issued the "Study May Proceed" Letter for this clinical trial under the Investigational New Drug (IND) number 149239. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Imatinib Mesylate , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Administration, Oral , Adult , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Critical Care/methods , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Double-Blind Method , Drug Monitoring , Female , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/administration & dosage , Imatinib Mesylate/adverse effects , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
19.
CA Cancer J Clin ; 70(6): 480-504, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750753

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has given rise to a pandemic of unprecedented proportions in the modern era because of its highly contagious nature and impact on human health and society: coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Patients with cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and established CV disease (CVD) are among those initially identified at the highest risk for serious complications, including death. Subsequent studies have pointed out that patients with cancer are also at high risk for a critical disease course. Therefore, the most vulnerable patients are seemingly those with both cancer and CVD, and a careful, unified approach in the evaluation and management of this patient population is especially needed in times of the COVID-19 pandemic. This review provides an overview of the unique implications of the viral outbreak for the field of cardio-oncology and outlines key modifications in the approach to this ever-increasing patient population. These modifications include a shift toward greater utilization of cardiac biomarkers and a more focused CV imaging approach in the broader context of modifications to typical practice pathways. The goal of this strategic adjustment is to minimize the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection (or other future viral outbreaks) while not becoming negligent of CVD and its important impact on the overall outcomes of patients who are being treated for cancer.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Anthracyclines/adverse effects , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Proteasome Inhibitors/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Radiotherapy/adverse effects , Receptor, ErbB-2/antagonists & inhibitors , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Trastuzumab/adverse effects
20.
Endocrine ; 70(1): 1-5, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697114

ABSTRACT

The recent coronavirus infectious disease (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is placing health systems in serious challenges worldwide. Shocking statistics each day has prompted the World Health Organization to officially declare the COVID-19 outbreak as a pandemic in March 2020. Preliminary studies have shown increased mortality in patients with solid cancers and infection by SARS-CoV-2. Until now, the evidence on the behavior of COVID-19 in patients with a history of thyroid cancer remains scarce, and most of the recommendations given are based on common sense. Therefore, in this viewpoint, we present a brief review of several challenges we are frequently facing during this pandemic and a series of recommendations based on what we have implemented in our clinical practice at a university hospital currently mostly dedicated to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Thyroid Neoplasms/epidemiology , Biopsy, Fine-Needle/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Humans , Immune System , Iodine Radioisotopes/adverse effects , Iodine Radioisotopes/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Radiotherapy/adverse effects , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thyroid Neoplasms/immunology , Thyroid Neoplasms/therapy , Thyroxine/therapeutic use , World Health Organization
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