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1.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(D1): D1-D10, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607482

ABSTRACT

The 2022 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue contains 185 papers, including 87 papers reporting on new databases and 85 updates from resources previously published in the Issue. Thirteen additional manuscripts provide updates on databases most recently published elsewhere. Seven new databases focus specifically on COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2, including SCoV2-MD, the first of the Issue's Breakthrough Articles. Major nucleic acid databases reporting updates include MODOMICS, JASPAR and miRTarBase. The AlphaFold Protein Structure Database, described in the second Breakthrough Article, is the stand-out in the protein section, where the Human Proteoform Atlas and GproteinDb are other notable new arrivals. Updates from DisProt, FuzDB and ELM comprehensively cover disordered proteins. Under the metabolism and signalling section Reactome, ConsensusPathDB, HMDB and CAZy are major returning resources. In microbial and viral genomes taxonomy and systematics are well covered by LPSN, TYGS and GTDB. Genomics resources include Ensembl, Ensembl Genomes and UCSC Genome Browser. Major returning pharmacology resource names include the IUPHAR/BPS guide and the Therapeutic Target Database. New plant databases include PlantGSAD for gene lists and qPTMplants for post-translational modifications. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (https://academic.oup.com/nar). Our latest update to the NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection brings the total number of entries to 1645. Following last year's major cleanup, we have updated 317 entries, listing 89 new resources and trimming 80 discontinued URLs. The current release is available at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/.


Subject(s)
Databases, Factual , Molecular Biology , Animals , COVID-19 , Databases, Nucleic Acid , Databases, Protein , Genome, Microbial , Genome, Viral , Humans , Mice , Plants/genetics , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , Proteome , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Signal Transduction
2.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598446

ABSTRACT

Organ-specific proteins (OSPs) possess great medical potential both in clinics and in biomedical research. Applications of them-such as alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and troponins-in clinics have raised certain concerns of their organ specificity. The dynamics and diversity of protein expression in heterogeneous human populations are well known, yet their effects on OSPs are less addressed. Here, we used mice as a model and implemented a breadth study to examine the panorgan proteome for potential variations in organ specificity in different genetic backgrounds. Using reasonable resources, we generated panorgan proteomes of four in-bred mouse strains. The results revealed a large diversity that was more profound among OSPs than among proteomes overall. We defined a robustness score to quantify such variation and derived three sets of OSPs with different stringencies. In the meantime, we found that the enriched biological functions of OSPs are also organ-specific and are sensitive and useful to assess the quality of OSPs. We hope our breadth study can open doors to explore the molecular diversity and dynamics of organ specificity at the protein level.


Subject(s)
Organ Specificity/genetics , Proteins/genetics , Proteome/genetics , Proteomics , Animals , Genetic Variation/genetics , Humans , Mice
3.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259165, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581791

ABSTRACT

The rapid, sensitive and specific detection of SARS-CoV-2 is critical in responding to the current COVID-19 outbreak. In this proof-of-concept study, we explored the potential of targeted mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 proteins in both research samples and clinical specimens. First, we assessed the limit of detection for several SARS-CoV-2 proteins by parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) MS in infected Vero E6 cells. For tryptic peptides of Nucleocapsid protein, the limit of detection was estimated to be in the mid-attomole range (9E-13 g). Next, this PRM methodology was applied to the detection of viral proteins in various COVID-19 patient clinical specimens, such as sputum and nasopharyngeal swabs. SARS-CoV-2 proteins were detected in these samples with high sensitivity in all specimens with PCR Ct values <24 and in several samples with higher CT values. A clear relationship was observed between summed MS peak intensities for SARS-CoV-2 proteins and Ct values reflecting the abundance of viral RNA. Taken together, these results suggest that targeted MS based proteomics may have the potential to be used as an additional tool in COVID-19 diagnostics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Proteins/isolation & purification , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Nucleocapsid/genetics , Nucleocapsid/isolation & purification , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/isolation & purification , Proteome/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sputum/virology , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/genetics
4.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 774340, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581380

ABSTRACT

Prevalence of fungal diseases has increased globally in recent years, which often associated with increased immunocompromised patients, aging populations, and the novel Coronavirus pandemic. Furthermore, due to the limitation of available antifungal agents mortality and morbidity rates of invasion fungal disease remain stubbornly high, and the emergence of multidrug-resistant fungi exacerbates the problem. Fungal pathogenicity and interactions between fungi and host have been the focus of many studies, as a result, lots of pathogenic mechanisms and fungal virulence factors have been identified. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a novel approach to better understand fungal pathogenicities and host-pathogen interactions at protein and protein posttranslational modification (PTM) levels. The approach has successfully elucidated interactions between pathogens and hosts by examining, for example, samples of fungal cells under different conditions, body fluids from infected patients, and exosomes. Many studies conclude that protein and PTM levels in both pathogens and hosts play important roles in progression of fungal diseases. This review summarizes mass spectrometry studies of protein and PTM levels from perspectives of both pathogens and hosts and provides an integrative conceptual outlook on fungal pathogenesis, antifungal agents development, and host-pathogen interactions.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions , Mycoses , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Proteome/metabolism
5.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2410: 149-175, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575668

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses are causative agents of different zoonosis including SARS, MERS, or COVID-19 in humans. The high transmission rate of coronaviruses, the time-consuming development of efficient anti-infectives and vaccines, the possible evolutionary adaptation of the virus to conventional vaccines, and the challenge to cover broad human population worldwide are the major reasons that made it challenging to avoid coronaviruses outbreaks. Although, a plethora of different approaches are being followed to design and develop vaccines against coronaviruses, most of them target subunits, full-length single, or only a very limited number of proteins. Vaccine targeting multiple proteins or even the entire proteome of the coronavirus is yet to come. In the present chapter, we will be discussing multi-epitope vaccine (MEV) and multi-patch vaccine (MPV) approaches to design and develop efficient and sustainably successful strategies against coronaviruses. MEV and MPV utilize highly conserved, potentially immunogenic epitopes and antigenic patches, respectively, and hence they have the potential to target large number of coronavirus proteins or even its entire proteome, allowing us to combat the challenge of its evolutionary adaptation. In addition, the large number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles targeted by the chosen specific epitopes enables MEV and MPV to cover broader global population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte , Viral Vaccines , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Proteome , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Viral Vaccines/immunology
6.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We evaluated how plasma proteomic signatures in patients with suspected COVID-19 can unravel the pathophysiology, and determine kinetics and clinical outcome of the infection. METHODS: Plasma samples from patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with symptoms of COVID-19 were stratified into: (1) patients with suspected COVID-19 that was not confirmed (n = 44); (2) non-hospitalized patients with confirmed COVID-19 (n = 44); (3) hospitalized patients with confirmed COVID-19 (n = 53) with variable outcome; and (4) patients presenting to the ED with minor diseases unrelated to SARS-CoV-2 infection (n = 20). Besides standard of care diagnostics, 177 circulating proteins related to inflammation and cardiovascular disease were analyzed using proximity extension assay (PEA, Olink) technology. RESULTS: Comparative proteome analysis revealed 14 distinct proteins as highly associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection and 12 proteins with subsequent hospitalization (p < 0.001). ADM, IL-6, MCP-3, TRAIL-R2, and PD-L1 were each predictive for death (AUROC curve 0.80-0.87). The consistent increase of these markers, from hospital admission to intensive care and fatality, supported the concept that these proteins are of major clinical relevance. CONCLUSIONS: We identified distinct plasma proteins linked to the presence and course of COVID-19. These plasma proteomic findings may translate to a protein fingerprint, helping to assist clinical management decisions.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Plasma/metabolism , Proteome , Berlin , Blood Proteins , COVID-19/drug therapy , Emergency Medicine , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitalization , Humans , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Cell ; 184(26): 6243-6261.e27, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536467

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-induced "acute respiratory distress syndrome" (ARDS) is associated with prolonged respiratory failure and high mortality, but the mechanistic basis of lung injury remains incompletely understood. Here, we analyze pulmonary immune responses and lung pathology in two cohorts of patients with COVID-19 ARDS using functional single-cell genomics, immunohistology, and electron microscopy. We describe an accumulation of CD163-expressing monocyte-derived macrophages that acquired a profibrotic transcriptional phenotype during COVID-19 ARDS. Gene set enrichment and computational data integration revealed a significant similarity between COVID-19-associated macrophages and profibrotic macrophage populations identified in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. COVID-19 ARDS was associated with clinical, radiographic, histopathological, and ultrastructural hallmarks of pulmonary fibrosis. Exposure of human monocytes to SARS-CoV-2, but not influenza A virus or viral RNA analogs, was sufficient to induce a similar profibrotic phenotype in vitro. In conclusion, we demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 triggers profibrotic macrophage responses and pronounced fibroproliferative ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , Macrophages/pathology , Macrophages/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cell Communication , Cohort Studies , Fibroblasts/pathology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/pathology , Phenotype , Proteome/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Transcription, Genetic
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 738093, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518484

ABSTRACT

Disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus (COVID-19) led to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. A systemic hyper-inflammation characterizes severe COVID-19 disease, often associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Blood biomarkers capable of risk stratification are of great importance in effective triage and critical care of severe COVID-19 patients. Flow cytometry and next-generation sequencing were done on peripheral blood cells and urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), and cytokines were measured from and mass spectrometry-based proteomics was done on plasma samples from an Indian cohort of COVID-19 patients. Publicly available single-cell RNA sequencing data were analyzed for validation of primary data. Statistical analyses were performed to validate risk stratification. We report here higher plasma abundance of suPAR, expressed by an abnormally expanded myeloid cell population, in severe COVID-19 patients with ARDS. The plasma suPAR level was found to be linked to a characteristic plasma proteome, associated with coagulation disorders and complement activation. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis to predict mortality identified a cutoff value of suPAR at 1,996.809 pg/ml (odds ratio: 2.9286, 95% confidence interval 1.0427-8.2257). Lower-than-cutoff suPAR levels were associated with a differential expression of the immune transcriptome as well as favorable clinical outcomes, in terms of both survival benefit (hazard ratio: 0.3615, 95% confidence interval 0.1433-0.912) and faster disease remission in our patient cohort. Thus, we identified suPAR as a key pathogenic circulating molecule linking systemic hyperinflammation to the hypercoagulable state and stratifying clinical outcomes in severe COVID-19 patients with ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/immunology , Blood Proteins/analysis , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Middle Aged , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Proteome/analysis , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
10.
Mol Syst Biol ; 17(11): e10396, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488875

ABSTRACT

Treatment options for COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, remain limited. Understanding viral pathogenesis at the molecular level is critical to develop effective therapy. Some recent studies have explored SARS-CoV-2-host interactomes and provided great resources for understanding viral replication. However, host proteins that functionally associate with SARS-CoV-2 are localized in the corresponding subnetwork within the comprehensive human interactome. Therefore, constructing a downstream network including all potential viral receptors, host cell proteases, and cofactors is necessary and should be used as an additional criterion for the validation of critical host machineries used for viral processing. This study applied both affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) and the complementary proximity-based labeling MS method (BioID-MS) on 29 viral ORFs and 18 host proteins with potential roles in viral replication to map the interactions relevant to viral processing. The analysis yields a list of 693 hub proteins sharing interactions with both viral baits and host baits and revealed their biological significance for SARS-CoV-2. Those hub proteins then served as a rational resource for drug repurposing via a virtual screening approach. The overall process resulted in the suggested repurposing of 59 compounds for 15 protein targets. Furthermore, antiviral effects of some candidate drugs were observed in vitro validation using image-based drug screen with infectious SARS-CoV-2. In addition, our results suggest that the antiviral activity of methotrexate could be associated with its inhibitory effect on specific protein-protein interactions.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Proteome/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/virology , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Methotrexate/pharmacology , Proteomics , Virus Replication/drug effects
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 741502, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477825

ABSTRACT

Host innate immune response follows severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, and it is the driver of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) amongst other inflammatory end-organ morbidities. Such life-threatening coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is heralded by virus-induced activation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs; monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells). MPs play substantial roles in aberrant immune secretory activities affecting profound systemic inflammation and end-organ malfunctions. All follow the presence of persistent viral components and virions without evidence of viral replication. To elucidate SARS-CoV-2-MP interactions we investigated transcriptomic and proteomic profiles of human monocyte-derived macrophages. While expression of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, paralleled monocyte-macrophage differentiation, it failed to affect productive viral infection. In contrast, simple macrophage viral exposure led to robust pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression but attenuated type I interferon (IFN) activity. Both paralleled dysregulation of innate immune signaling pathways, specifically those linked to IFN. We conclude that the SARS-CoV-2-infected host mounts a robust innate immune response characterized by a pro-inflammatory storm heralding end-organ tissue damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Immunity, Innate , Macrophages/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Regulatory Networks , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/metabolism , Proteome , Proteomics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction , Transcriptome
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463710

ABSTRACT

The present Special Issue focuses on the latest approaches to health and public health microbiology using multiomics [...].


Subject(s)
Bacteria/growth & development , Holistic Health/standards , Metabolome , Metagenome , Microbiota , Proteome , Public Health/standards , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Humans
13.
Nat Immunol ; 22(11): 1452-1464, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454797

ABSTRACT

There is limited understanding of the viral antibody fingerprint following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in children. Herein, SARS-CoV-2 proteome-wide immunoprofiling of children with mild/moderate or severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) versus multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children versus hospitalized control patients revealed differential cytokine responses, IgM/IgG/IgA epitope diversity, antibody binding and avidity. Apart from spike and nucleocapsid, IgG/IgA recognized epitopes in nonstructural protein (NSP) 2, NSP3, NSP12-NSP14 and open reading frame (ORF) 3a-ORF9. Peptides representing epitopes in NSP12, ORF3a and ORF8 demonstrated SARS-CoV-2 serodiagnosis. Antibody-binding kinetics with 24 SARS-CoV-2 proteins revealed antibody parameters that distinguish children with mild/moderate versus severe COVID-19 or multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. Antibody avidity to prefusion spike correlated with decreased illness severity and served as a clinical disease indicator. The fusion peptide and heptad repeat 2 region induced SARS-CoV-2-neutralizing antibodies in rabbits. Thus, we identified SARS-CoV-2 antibody signatures in children associated with disease severity and delineate promising serodiagnostic and virus neutralization targets. These findings might guide the design of serodiagnostic assays, prognostic algorithms, therapeutics and vaccines in this important but understudied population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Adolescent , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Progression , Epitopes/metabolism , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Immunoglobulin A/metabolism , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , Immunoglobulin M/metabolism , Male , Prognosis , Proteome , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis
14.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(10): e1009412, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448584

ABSTRACT

Viral proteins localize within subcellular compartments to subvert host machinery and promote pathogenesis. To study SARS-CoV-2 biology, we generated an atlas of 2422 human proteins vicinal to 17 SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins using proximity proteomics. This identified viral proteins at specific intracellular locations, such as association of accessary proteins with intracellular membranes, and projected SARS-CoV-2 impacts on innate immune signaling, ER-Golgi transport, and protein translation. It identified viral protein adjacency to specific host proteins whose regulatory variants are linked to COVID-19 severity, including the TRIM4 interferon signaling regulator which was found proximal to the SARS-CoV-2 M protein. Viral NSP1 protein adjacency to the EIF3 complex was associated with inhibited host protein translation whereas ORF6 localization with MAVS was associated with inhibited RIG-I 2CARD-mediated IFNB1 promoter activation. Quantitative proteomics identified candidate host targets for the NSP5 protease, with specific functional cleavage sequences in host proteins CWC22 and FANCD2. This data resource identifies host factors proximal to viral proteins in living human cells and nominates pathogenic mechanisms employed by SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Host-Parasite Interactions/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Protein Biosynthesis/physiology , Proteome/metabolism
15.
J Virol ; 95(20): e0101021, 2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440800

ABSTRACT

The host response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is poorly understood due to a lack of an animal model that recapitulates severe human disease. Here, we report a Syrian hamster model that develops progressive lethal pulmonary disease that closely mimics severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We evaluated host responses using a multi-omic, multiorgan approach to define proteome, phosphoproteome, and transcriptome changes. These data revealed both type I and type II interferon-stimulated gene and protein expression along with a progressive increase in chemokines, monocytes, and neutrophil-associated molecules throughout the course of infection that peaked in the later time points correlating with a rapidly developing diffuse alveolar destruction and pneumonia that persisted in the absence of active viral infection. Extrapulmonary proteome and phosphoproteome remodeling was detected in the heart and kidneys following viral infection. Together, our results provide a kinetic overview of multiorgan host responses to severe SARS-CoV-2 infection in vivo. IMPORTANCE The current pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has created an urgent need to understand the pathogenesis of this infection. These efforts have been impaired by the lack of animal models that recapitulate severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we report a hamster model that develops severe COVID-19-like disease following infection with human isolates of SARS-CoV-2. To better understand pathogenesis, we evaluated changes in gene transcription and protein expression over the course of infection to provide an integrated multiorgan kinetic analysis of the host response to infection. These data reveal a dynamic innate immune response to infection and corresponding immune pathologies consistent with severe human disease. Altogether, this model will be useful for understanding the pathogenesis of severe COVID-19 and for testing interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Immunity, Innate , Proteome , Transcriptome , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Gene Ontology , Heart/virology , Kidney/metabolism , Kidney/virology , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Mesocricetus , Myocardium/metabolism , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Viral Load
16.
Front Immunol ; 12: 730710, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441108

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 challenges the understanding of factors affecting disease progression and severity. The identification of prognostic biomarkers and physiological processes associated with disease symptoms is relevant for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions to contribute to the control of this pandemic. To address this challenge, in this study, we used a quantitative proteomics together with multiple data analysis algorithms to characterize serum protein profiles in five cohorts from healthy to SARS-CoV-2-infected recovered (hospital discharge), nonsevere (hospitalized), and severe [at the intensive care unit (ICU)] cases with increasing systemic inflammation in comparison with healthy individuals sampled prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The results showed significantly dysregulated proteins and associated biological processes and disorders associated to COVID-19. These results corroborated previous findings in COVID-19 studies and highlighted how the representation of dysregulated serum proteins and associated BPs increases with COVID-19 disease symptomatology from asymptomatic to severe cases. The analysis was then focused on novel disease processes and biomarkers that were correlated with disease symptomatology. To contribute to translational medicine, results corroborated the predictive value of selected immune-related biomarkers for disease recovery [Selenoprotein P (SELENOP) and Serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON1)], severity [Carboxypeptidase B2 (CBP2)], and symptomatology [Pregnancy zone protein (PZP)] using protein-specific ELISA tests. Our results contributed to the characterization of SARS-CoV-2-host molecular interactions with potential contributions to the monitoring and control of this pandemic by using immune-related biomarkers associated with disease symptomatology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aryldialkylphosphatase/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Carboxypeptidase B2/blood , Female , Humans , Interleukin-1/blood , Interleukin-4/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pregnancy Proteins/blood , Prognosis , Proteome/analysis , Proteomics , Retrospective Studies , Selenoprotein P/blood
17.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5536, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428813

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are important human pathogens for which no specific treatment is available. Here, we provide evidence that pharmacological reprogramming of ER stress pathways can be exploited to suppress CoV replication. The ER stress inducer thapsigargin efficiently inhibits coronavirus (HCoV-229E, MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2) replication in different cell types including primary differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells, (partially) reverses the virus-induced translational shut-down, improves viability of infected cells and counteracts the CoV-mediated downregulation of IRE1α and the ER chaperone BiP. Proteome-wide analyses revealed specific pathways, protein networks and components that likely mediate the thapsigargin-induced antiviral state, including essential (HERPUD1) or novel (UBA6 and ZNF622) factors of ER quality control, and ER-associated protein degradation complexes. Additionally, thapsigargin blocks the CoV-induced selective autophagic flux involving p62/SQSTM1. The data show that thapsigargin hits several central mechanisms required for CoV replication, suggesting that this compound (or derivatives thereof) may be developed into broad-spectrum anti-CoV drugs.


Subject(s)
Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/physiology , Animals , Autophagy/drug effects , Bronchi/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cell Extracts , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/genetics , Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/virology , Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Macrolides/pharmacology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Proteome/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Thapsigargin/pharmacology , Unfolded Protein Response/drug effects , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
18.
Proteomics ; 21(10): e2000279, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384282

ABSTRACT

While protein-protein interaction is the first step of the SARS-CoV-2 infection, recent comparative proteomic profiling enabled the identification of over 11,000 protein dynamics, thus providing a comprehensive reflection of the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular system in response to viral infection. Here we summarize and rationalize the results obtained by various mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches applied to the functional characterization of proteins and pathways associated with SARS-CoV-2-mediated infections in humans. Comparative analysis of cell-lines versus tissue samples indicates that our knowledge in proteome profile alternation in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection is still incomplete and the tissue-specific response to SARS-CoV-2 infection can probably not be recapitulated efficiently by in vitro experiments. However, regardless of the viral infection period, sample types, and experimental strategies, a thorough cross-comparison of the recently published proteome, phosphoproteome, and interactome datasets led to the identification of a common set of proteins and kinases associated with PI3K-Akt, EGFR, MAPK, Rap1, and AMPK signaling pathways. Ephrin receptor A2 (EPHA2) was identified by 11 studies including all proteomic platforms, suggesting it as a potential future target for SARS-CoV-2 infection mechanisms and the development of new therapeutic strategies. We further discuss the potentials of future proteomics strategies for identifying prognostic SARS-CoV-2 responsive age-, gender-dependent, tissue-specific protein targets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Mass Spectrometry/methods , Proteomics/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Protein Interaction Mapping/methods , Protein Interaction Maps , Protein Kinases/analysis , Protein Kinases/metabolism , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , Proteome/analysis , Proteome/metabolism , Receptor, EphA2/analysis , Receptor, EphA2/metabolism , Signal Transduction
19.
BMC Bioinformatics ; 22(1): 107, 2021 Mar 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388727

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Visual exploration of gene product behavior across multiple omic datasets can pinpoint technical limitations in data and reveal biological trends. Still, such exploration is challenging as there is a need for visualizations that are tailored for the purpose. RESULTS: The OmicLoupe software was developed to facilitate visual data exploration and provides more than 15 interactive cross-dataset visualizations for omics data. It expands visualizations to multiple datasets for quality control, statistical comparisons and overlap and correlation analyses, while allowing for rapid inspection and downloading of selected features. The usage of OmicLoupe is demonstrated in three different studies, where it allowed for detection of both technical data limitations and biological trends across different omic layers. An example is an analysis of SARS-CoV-2 infection based on two previously published studies, where OmicLoupe facilitated the identification of gene products with consistent expression changes across datasets at both the transcript and protein levels. CONCLUSIONS: OmicLoupe provides fast exploration of omics data with tailored visualizations for comparisons within and across data layers. The interactive visualizations are highly informative and are expected to be useful in various analyses of both newly generated and previously published data. OmicLoupe is available at quantitativeproteomics.org/omicloupe.


Subject(s)
Computational Biology/instrumentation , Knowledge Discovery , Software , COVID-19/genetics , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Humans , Proteome , Transcriptome
20.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 225, 2021 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387490

ABSTRACT

Serodiagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection is impeded by immunological cross-reactivity among the human coronaviruses (HCoVs): SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1, MERS-CoV, OC43, 229E, HKU1, and NL63. Here we report the identification of humoral immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 peptides that may enable discrimination between exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and other HCoVs. We used a high-density peptide microarray and plasma samples collected at two time points from 50 subjects with SARS-CoV-2 infection confirmed by qPCR, samples collected in 2004-2005 from 11 subjects with IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-1, 11 subjects with IgG antibodies to other seasonal human coronaviruses (HCoV), and 10 healthy human subjects. Through statistical modeling with linear regression and multidimensional scaling we identified specific peptides that were reassembled to identify 29 linear SARS-CoV-2 epitopes that were immunoreactive with plasma from individuals who had asymptomatic, mild or severe SARS-CoV-2 infections. Larger studies will be required to determine whether these peptides may be useful in serodiagnostics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Peptide Mapping , Peptides/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , COVID-19/blood , Chiroptera , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , Peptides/chemistry , Proteome/metabolism
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