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1.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259165, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581791

ABSTRACT

The rapid, sensitive and specific detection of SARS-CoV-2 is critical in responding to the current COVID-19 outbreak. In this proof-of-concept study, we explored the potential of targeted mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 proteins in both research samples and clinical specimens. First, we assessed the limit of detection for several SARS-CoV-2 proteins by parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) MS in infected Vero E6 cells. For tryptic peptides of Nucleocapsid protein, the limit of detection was estimated to be in the mid-attomole range (9E-13 g). Next, this PRM methodology was applied to the detection of viral proteins in various COVID-19 patient clinical specimens, such as sputum and nasopharyngeal swabs. SARS-CoV-2 proteins were detected in these samples with high sensitivity in all specimens with PCR Ct values <24 and in several samples with higher CT values. A clear relationship was observed between summed MS peak intensities for SARS-CoV-2 proteins and Ct values reflecting the abundance of viral RNA. Taken together, these results suggest that targeted MS based proteomics may have the potential to be used as an additional tool in COVID-19 diagnostics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Proteins/isolation & purification , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Nucleocapsid/genetics , Nucleocapsid/isolation & purification , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/isolation & purification , Proteome/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sputum/virology , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/genetics
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 782731, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581325

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 and its variants are still hitting the world. Ever since the outbreak, neurological involvements as headache, ageusia, and anosmia in COVID-19 patients have been emphasized and reported. But the pathogenesis of these new-onset neurological manifestations in COVID-19 patients is still obscure and controversial. As difficulty always lay in the diagnosis of neurological infection, current reports to validate the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) almost relied on the basic methods and warranted improvement. Here we reported a case series of 8 patients with prominent new-onset neurological manifestations, who were screened out from a patch of 304 COVID-19 confirmed patients. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and proteomics were conducted in the simultaneously obtained CSF and serum samples of the selected patients, with three non-COVID-19 patients with matched demographic features used as the controls for proteomic analysis. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in the CSF of four COVID-19 patients and was suspicious in the rest four remaining patients by NGS, but was negative in all serum samples. Proteomic analysis revealed that 185 and 59 proteins were differentially expressed in CSF and serum samples, respectively, and that only 20 proteins were shared, indicating that the proteomic changes in CSF were highly specific. Further proteomic annotation highlighted the involvement of complement system, PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, enhanced cellular interaction, and macrophages in the CSF proteomic alterations. This study, equipped with NGS and proteomics, reported a high detection rate of SARS-CoV-2 in the CSF of COVID-19 patients and the proteomic alteration of CSF, which would provide insights into understanding the pathological mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 CNS infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , Central Nervous System Diseases/virology , Cerebrospinal Fluid/metabolism , Cerebrospinal Fluid/virology , RNA, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Analysis, RNA
3.
OMICS ; 25(11): 681-692, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541502

ABSTRACT

Multiomics study designs have significantly increased understanding of complex biological systems. The multiomics literature is rapidly expanding and so is their heterogeneity. However, the intricacy and fragmentation of omics data are impeding further research. To examine current trends in multiomics field, we reviewed 52 articles from PubMed and Web of Science, which used an integrated omics approach, published between March 2006 and January 2021. From studies, data regarding investigated loci, species, omics type, and phenotype were extracted, curated, and streamlined according to standardized terminology, and summarized in a previously developed graphical summary. Evaluated studies included 21 omics types or applications of omics technology such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, epigenomics, environmental omics, and pharmacogenomics, species of various phyla including human, mouse, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and various phenotypes, including cancer and COVID-19. In the analyzed studies, diverse methods, protocols, results, and terminology were used and accordingly, assessment of the studies was challenging. Adoption of standardized multiomics data presentation in the future will further buttress standardization of terminology and reporting of results in systems science. This shall catalyze, we suggest, innovation in both science communication and laboratory medicine by making available scientific knowledge that is easier to grasp, share, and harness toward medical breakthroughs.


Subject(s)
Computational Biology/trends , Genomics/trends , Metabolomics/trends , Proteomics/trends , Animals , COVID-19 , Computer Graphics , Epigenomics/trends , Gene Expression Profiling/trends , Humans , Pharmacogenetics/trends , Publications , SARS-CoV-2 , Terminology as Topic
4.
Nat Biotechnol ; 39(7): 809-810, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510601
5.
Front Immunol ; 12: 724914, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506196

ABSTRACT

The year 2019 has seen an emergence of the novel coronavirus named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19). Since the onset of the pandemic, biological and interdisciplinary research is being carried out across the world at a rapid pace to beat the pandemic. There is an increased need to comprehensively understand various aspects of the virus from detection to treatment options including drugs and vaccines for effective global management of the disease. In this review, we summarize the salient findings pertaining to SARS-CoV-2 biology, including symptoms, hosts, epidemiology, SARS-CoV-2 genome, and its emerging variants, viral diagnostics, host-pathogen interactions, alternative antiviral strategies and application of machine learning heuristics and artificial intelligence for effective management of COVID-19 and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Heuristics , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Pandemics , Proteomics , Transcriptome
6.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 765039, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497027

ABSTRACT

A continual rise in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection causing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has become a global threat. The main problem comes when SARS-CoV-2 gets mutated with the rising infection and becomes more lethal for humankind than ever. Mutations in the structural proteins of SARS-CoV-2, i.e., the spike surface glycoprotein (S), envelope (E), membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N), and replication machinery enzymes, i.e., main protease (Mpro) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) creating more complexities towards pathogenesis and the available COVID-19 therapeutic strategies. This study analyzes how a minimal variation in these enzymes, especially in S protein at the genomic/proteomic level, affects pathogenesis. The structural variations are discussed in light of the failure of small molecule development in COVID-19 therapeutic strategies. We have performed in-depth sequence- and structure-based analyses of these proteins to get deeper insights into the mechanism of pathogenesis, structure-function relationships, and development of modern therapeutic approaches. Structural and functional consequences of the selected mutations on these proteins and their association with SARS-CoV-2 virulency and human health are discussed in detail in the light of our comparative genomics analysis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Genomics , Humans , Proteomics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
7.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 86-97, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cultured cell lines are widely used for research in the physiology, pathophysiology, toxicology, and pharmacology of the renal proximal tubule. The lines that are most appropriate for a given use depend upon the genes expressed. New tools for transcriptomic profiling using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) make it possible to catalog expressed genes in each cell line. METHODS: Fourteen different proximal tubule cell lines, representing six species, were grown on permeable supports under conditions specific for the respective lines. RNA-Seq followed standard procedures. RESULTS: Transcripts expressed in cell lines variably matched transcripts selectively expressed in native proximal tubule. Opossum kidney (OK) cells displayed the highest percentage match (45% of proximal marker genes [TPM threshold =15]), with pig kidney cells (LLC-PK1) close behind (39%). Lower-percentage matches were seen for various human lines, including HK-2 (26%), and lines from rodent kidneys, such as NRK-52E (23%). Nominally, identical OK cells from different sources differed substantially in expression of proximal tubule markers. Mapping cell line transcriptomes to gene sets for various proximal tubule functions (sodium and water transport, protein transport, metabolic functions, endocrine functions) showed that different lines may be optimal for experimentally modeling each function. An online resource (https://esbl.nhlbi.nih.gov/JBrowse/KCT/) has been created to interrogate cell line transcriptome data. Proteomic analysis of NRK-52E cells confirmed low expression of many proximal tubule marker proteins. CONCLUSIONS: No cell line fully matched the transcriptome of native proximal tubule cells. However, some of the lines tested are suitable for the study of particular metabolic and transport processes seen in the proximal tubule.


Subject(s)
Cell Culture Techniques/methods , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/metabolism , Transcriptome , Animals , Biological Transport , Cell Line , Chromatography, Liquid , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Internet , Mice , Opossums , Proteomics , RNA-Seq , Rats , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Species Specificity , Swine , Tandem Mass Spectrometry
8.
Crit Care Med ; 49(7): 1149-1158, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494026

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Circulating nucleosomes and their component histones have been implicated as pathogenic in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. However, their role in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome is unknown. DESIGN: We performed a prospective cohort study in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, with plasma collection within 24 hours of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. We associated nucleosome levels with severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome and with nonpulmonary organ failures and tested for association of nucleosomes with PICU mortality and ventilator-free days at 28 days in univariate and multivariable analyses. We also performed proteomics of DNA-bound plasma proteins in a matched case-control study of septic children with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome in order to identify specific histone proteins elevated in acute respiratory distress syndrome. SETTING: Large academic tertiary-care PICU. PATIENTS: Intubated children meeting Berlin criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We enrolled 333 children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, with 69 nonsurvivors (21%). Plasma nucleosomes were correlated with acute respiratory distress syndrome severity and with the number of nonpulmonary organ failures at acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. Nucleosomes were higher (p < 0.001) in nonsurvivors (0.40 [interquartile range, 0.20-0.71] arbitrary units) relative to survivors (0.10 [interquartile range, 0.04-0.25] arbitrary units). Nucleosomes were associated with PICU mortality in multivariable analysis (adjusted odds ratio 1.84 per 1 sd increase; 95% CI, 1.38-2.45; p < 0.001). Nucleosomes were also associated with a lower probability of being extubated alive by day 28 after multivariable adjustment (adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.88; p = 0.001). Proteomic analysis demonstrated higher levels of the core nucleosome histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 in septic children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, relative to septic children without acute respiratory distress syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma nucleosomes are associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome severity, nonpulmonary organ failures, and worse outcomes in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.


Subject(s)
Histones/blood , Nucleosomes/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Adolescent , Airway Extubation , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , DNA/blood , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Proteomics , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/complications , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
9.
ACS Infect Dis ; 7(6): 1303-1316, 2021 06 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493009

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted global healthcare and economic systems throughout 2020 with no clear end in sight. While the pandemic continues to have deleterious effects across the globe, mechanisms for disrupting disease transmission have relied on behavioral controls (e.g., social distancing, masks, and hygiene) as there are currently no vaccines approved for use and limited therapeutic options. As this pandemic has demonstrated our vulnerability to newly emerging viruses, there has been strong interest in utilizing proteomics approaches to identify targets for repurposed drugs as novel therapeutic candidates that could be fast-tracked for human use. Building on a previous discussion on the combination of proteomics technologies with clinical data for combating emerging viruses, we discuss how these technologies are being employed for COVID-19 and the current state of knowledge regarding repurposed drugs in these efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Pandemics , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Mol Syst Biol ; 17(11): e10396, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488875

ABSTRACT

Treatment options for COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, remain limited. Understanding viral pathogenesis at the molecular level is critical to develop effective therapy. Some recent studies have explored SARS-CoV-2-host interactomes and provided great resources for understanding viral replication. However, host proteins that functionally associate with SARS-CoV-2 are localized in the corresponding subnetwork within the comprehensive human interactome. Therefore, constructing a downstream network including all potential viral receptors, host cell proteases, and cofactors is necessary and should be used as an additional criterion for the validation of critical host machineries used for viral processing. This study applied both affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) and the complementary proximity-based labeling MS method (BioID-MS) on 29 viral ORFs and 18 host proteins with potential roles in viral replication to map the interactions relevant to viral processing. The analysis yields a list of 693 hub proteins sharing interactions with both viral baits and host baits and revealed their biological significance for SARS-CoV-2. Those hub proteins then served as a rational resource for drug repurposing via a virtual screening approach. The overall process resulted in the suggested repurposing of 59 compounds for 15 protein targets. Furthermore, antiviral effects of some candidate drugs were observed in vitro validation using image-based drug screen with infectious SARS-CoV-2. In addition, our results suggest that the antiviral activity of methotrexate could be associated with its inhibitory effect on specific protein-protein interactions.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Proteome/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/virology , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Methotrexate/pharmacology , Proteomics , Virus Replication/drug effects
11.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(10): e1009928, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484868

ABSTRACT

Non-specific protective effects of certain vaccines have been reported, and long-term boosting of innate immunity, termed trained immunity, has been proposed as one of the mechanisms mediating these effects. Several epidemiological studies suggested cross-protection between influenza vaccination and COVID-19. In a large academic Dutch hospital, we found that SARS-CoV-2 infection was less common among employees who had received a previous influenza vaccination: relative risk reductions of 37% and 49% were observed following influenza vaccination during the first and second COVID-19 waves, respectively. The quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine induced a trained immunity program that boosted innate immune responses against various viral stimuli and fine-tuned the anti-SARS-CoV-2 response, which may result in better protection against COVID-19. Influenza vaccination led to transcriptional reprogramming of monocytes and reduced systemic inflammation. These epidemiological and immunological data argue for potential benefits of influenza vaccination against COVID-19, and future randomized trials are warranted to test this possibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cross Protection/physiology , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Down-Regulation , Imidazoles/immunology , Incidence , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Netherlands/epidemiology , Personnel, Hospital , Poly I-C/immunology , Proteomics , Risk Factors , Sequence Analysis, RNA
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 741502, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477825

ABSTRACT

Host innate immune response follows severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, and it is the driver of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) amongst other inflammatory end-organ morbidities. Such life-threatening coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is heralded by virus-induced activation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs; monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells). MPs play substantial roles in aberrant immune secretory activities affecting profound systemic inflammation and end-organ malfunctions. All follow the presence of persistent viral components and virions without evidence of viral replication. To elucidate SARS-CoV-2-MP interactions we investigated transcriptomic and proteomic profiles of human monocyte-derived macrophages. While expression of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, paralleled monocyte-macrophage differentiation, it failed to affect productive viral infection. In contrast, simple macrophage viral exposure led to robust pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression but attenuated type I interferon (IFN) activity. Both paralleled dysregulation of innate immune signaling pathways, specifically those linked to IFN. We conclude that the SARS-CoV-2-infected host mounts a robust innate immune response characterized by a pro-inflammatory storm heralding end-organ tissue damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Immunity, Innate , Macrophages/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Regulatory Networks , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/metabolism , Proteome , Proteomics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction , Transcriptome
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20638, 2021 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475483

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented threat to humanity that has provoked global health concerns. Since the etiopathogenesis of this illness is not fully characterized, the prognostic factors enabling treatment decisions have not been well documented. Accurately predicting the progression of the disease would aid in appropriate patient categorization and thus help determine the best treatment option. Here, we have introduced a proteomic approach utilizing data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry (DIA-MS) to identify the serum proteins that are closely associated with COVID-19 prognosis. Twenty-seven proteins were differentially expressed between severely ill COVID-19 patients with an adverse or favorable prognosis. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that 15 of the 27 proteins might be regulated by cytokine signaling relevant to interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and their differential expression was implicated in the systemic inflammatory response and in cardiovascular disorders. We further evaluated practical predictors of the clinical prognosis of severe COVID-19 patients. Subsequent ELISA assays revealed that CHI3L1 and IGFALS may serve as highly sensitive prognostic markers. Our findings can help formulate a diagnostic approach for accurately identifying COVID-19 patients with severe disease and for providing appropriate treatment based on their predicted prognosis.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/blood , Gene Expression Profiling , Proteomics/methods , Chitinase-3-Like Protein 1/metabolism , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-1beta/biosynthesis , Interleukin-6/biosynthesis , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/biosynthesis , Virus Diseases
14.
J Clin Invest ; 131(20)2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470549

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) manifests as a severe and uncontrolled inflammatory response with multiorgan involvement, occurring weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Here, we utilized proteomics, RNA sequencing, autoantibody arrays, and B cell receptor (BCR) repertoire analysis to characterize MIS-C immunopathogenesis and identify factors contributing to severe manifestations and intensive care unit admission. Inflammation markers, humoral immune responses, neutrophil activation, and complement and coagulation pathways were highly enriched in MIS-C patient serum, with a more hyperinflammatory profile in severe than in mild MIS-C cases. We identified a strong autoimmune signature in MIS-C, with autoantibodies targeted to both ubiquitously expressed and tissue-specific antigens, suggesting autoantigen release and excessive antigenic drive may result from systemic tissue damage. We further identified a cluster of patients with enhanced neutrophil responses as well as high anti-Spike IgG and autoantibody titers. BCR sequencing of these patients identified a strong imprint of antigenic drive with substantial BCR sequence connectivity and usage of autoimmunity-associated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) genes. This cluster was linked to a TRBV11-2 expanded T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, consistent with previous studies indicating a superantigen-driven pathogenic process. Overall, we identify a combination of pathogenic pathways that culminate in MIS-C and may inform treatment.


Subject(s)
Autoimmunity , COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Adolescent , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Female , Humans , Infant , Inflammation/immunology , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/genetics , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/immunology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/metabolism , Neutrophil Activation , Proteomics , RNA-Seq , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/genetics , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/metabolism
15.
Cell Rep ; 37(2): 109806, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466094

ABSTRACT

Tactical disruption of protein synthesis is an attractive therapeutic strategy, with the first-in-class eIF4A-targeting compound zotatifin in clinical evaluation for cancer and COVID-19. The full cellular impact and mechanisms of these potent molecules are undefined at a proteomic level. Here, we report mass spectrometry analysis of translational reprogramming by rocaglates, cap-dependent initiation disruptors that include zotatifin. We find effects to be far more complex than simple "translational inhibition" as currently defined. Translatome analysis by TMT-pSILAC (tandem mass tag-pulse stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture mass spectrometry) reveals myriad upregulated proteins that drive hitherto unrecognized cytotoxic mechanisms, including GEF-H1-mediated anti-survival RHOA/JNK activation. Surprisingly, these responses are not replicated by eIF4A silencing, indicating a broader translational adaptation than currently understood. Translation machinery analysis by MATRIX (mass spectrometry analysis of active translation factors using ribosome density fractionation and isotopic labeling experiments) identifies rocaglate-specific dependence on specific translation factors including eEF1ε1 that drive translatome remodeling. Our proteome-level interrogation reveals that the complete cellular response to these historical "translation inhibitors" is mediated by comprehensive translational landscape remodeling.


Subject(s)
Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Protein Synthesis Inhibitors/pharmacology , Animals , Benzofurans/pharmacology , Cell Line, Tumor , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-4A/drug effects , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-4A/metabolism , Humans , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred NOD , Primary Cell Culture , Protein Biosynthesis/physiology , Proteomics/methods , Ribosomes/metabolism , Transcriptome/drug effects , Transcriptome/genetics , Triterpenes/pharmacology
16.
Front Immunol ; 12: 725240, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463472

ABSTRACT

Ongoing evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus strains is posing new COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment challenges. To help efforts to meet these challenges we examined data acquired from proteomic analyses of human SARS-CoV-2-infected cell lines and samples from COVID-19 patients. Initially, 129 unique peptides were identified, which were rigorously evaluated for repeats, disorders, polymorphisms, antigenicity, immunogenicity, toxicity, allergens, sequence similarity to human proteins, and contributions from other potential cross-reacting pathogenic species or the human saliva microbiome. We also screened SARS-CoV-2-infected NBHE and A549 cell lines for presence of antigenic peptides, and identified paratope peptides from crystal structures of SARS-CoV-2 antigen-antibody complexes. We then selected four antigen peptides for docking with known viral unbound T-cell receptor (TCR), class I and II peptide major histocompatibility complex (pMHC), and identified paratope sequences. We also tested the paratope binding affinity of SARS-CoV T- and B-cell peptides that had been previously experimentally validated. The resultant antigenic peptides have high potential for generating SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies, and the paratope peptides can be directly used to develop a COVID-19 diagnostics assay. The presented genomics and proteomics-based in-silico approaches have apparent utility for identifying new diagnostic peptides that could be used to fight SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/metabolism , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/metabolism , Peptides/metabolism , Pulmonary Alveoli/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , A549 Cells , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Epitope Mapping , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/genetics , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/genetics , HLA Antigens/metabolism , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Peptides/genetics , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Protein Binding , Proteomics , Receptors, Antigen/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
17.
Anal Bioanal Chem ; 413(29): 7305-7318, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460297

ABSTRACT

The spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the global pandemic of COVID-19, is an abundant, heavily glycosylated surface protein that plays a key role in receptor binding and host cell fusion, and is the focus of all current vaccine development efforts. Variants of concern are now circulating worldwide that exhibit mutations in the spike protein. Protein sequence and glycosylation variations of the spike may affect viral fitness, antigenicity, and immune evasion. Global surveillance of the virus currently involves genome sequencing, but tracking emerging variants should include quantitative measurement of changes in site-specific glycosylation as well. In this work, we used data-dependent acquisition (DDA) and data-independent acquisition (DIA) mass spectrometry to quantitatively characterize the five N-linked glycosylation sites of the glycoprotein standard alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), as well as the 22 sites of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. We found that DIA compared favorably to DDA in sensitivity, resulting in more assignments of low-abundance glycopeptides. However, the reproducibility across replicates of DIA-identified glycopeptides was lower than that of DDA, possibly due to the difficulty of reliably assigning low-abundance glycopeptides confidently. The differences in the data acquired between the two methods suggest that DIA outperforms DDA in terms of glycoprotein coverage but that overall performance is a balance of sensitivity, selectivity, and statistical confidence in glycoproteomics. We assert that these analytical and bioinformatics methods for assigning and quantifying glycoforms would benefit the process of tracking viral variants as well as for vaccine development.


Subject(s)
Glycomics/methods , Mass Spectrometry/methods , Proteomics/methods , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Glycosylation , Humans , Limit of Detection , Reproducibility of Results , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
18.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 147: 513-520, 2020 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454163

ABSTRACT

The alternative splicing is a mechanism increasing the number of expressed proteins and a variety of these functions. We uncovered the protein domains most frequently lacked or occurred in the splice variants. Proteins presented by several isoforms participate in such processes as transcription regulation, immune response, etc. Our results displayed the association of alternative splicing with branched regulatory pathways. By considering the published data on the protein proteins encoded by the 18th human chromosome, we noted that alternative products display the differences in several functional features, such as phosphorylation, subcellular location, ligand specificity, protein-protein interactions, etc. The investigation of alternative variants referred to the protein kinase domain was performed by comparing the alternative sequences with 3D structures. It was shown that large enough insertions/deletions could be compatible with the kinase fold if they match between the conserved secondary structures. Using the 3D data on human proteins, we showed that conformational flexibility could accommodate fold alterations in splice variants. The investigations of structural and functional differences in splice isoforms are required to understand how to distinguish the isoforms expressed as functioning proteins from the non-realized transcripts. These studies allow filling the gap between genomic and proteomic data.


Subject(s)
Alternative Splicing , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18 , Databases, Protein , RNA-Binding Proteins , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18/metabolism , Humans , Protein Structure, Secondary , Proteomics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 744799, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448731

ABSTRACT

Sepsis is a global health emergency, which is caused by various sources of infection that lead to changes in gene expression, protein-coding, and metabolism. Advancements in "omics" technologies have provided valuable tools to unravel the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. In this study, we performed shotgun mass spectrometry in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from septic patients (N=24) and healthy controls (N=9) and combined these results with two public microarray leukocytes datasets. Through combination of transcriptome and proteome profiling, we identified 170 co-differentially expressed genes/proteins. Among these, 122 genes/proteins displayed the same expression trend. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed pathways related to lymphocyte functions with decreased status, and defense processes that were predicted to be strongly increased. Protein-protein interaction network analyses revealed two densely connected regions, which mainly included down-regulated genes/proteins that were related to the transcription of RNA, translation of proteins, and mitochondrial translation. Additionally, we identified one module comprising of up-regulated genes/proteins, which were mainly related to low-density neutrophils (LDNs). LDNs were reported in sepsis and in COVID-19. Changes in gene expression level were validated using quantitative real-time PCR in PBMCs from patients with sepsis. To further support that the source of the upregulated module of genes/proteins found in our results were derived from LDNs, we identified an increase of this population by flow cytometry in PBMC samples obtained from the same cohort of septic patients included in the proteomic analysis. This study provides new insights into a reprioritization of biological functions in response to sepsis that involved a transcriptional and translational shutdown of genes/proteins, with exception of a set of genes/proteins related to LDNs and host-defense system.


Subject(s)
Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Neutrophils/metabolism , Sepsis/metabolism , Databases, Factual , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/cytology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/metabolism , Neutrophils/cytology , Protein Interaction Maps , Proteomics , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/immunology
20.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0258019, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443854

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage across the globe and take millions of lives and like many parts of the world, the second wave of the pandemic hit Bangladesh, this study aimed at understanding its causative agent, SARS-CoV-2 at the genomic and proteomic level and provide precious insights about the pathogenesis, evolution, strengths and weaknesses of the virus. As of Mid-June 2021, over 1500 SARS-CoV-2 genomesequences have been deposited in the GISAID database from Bangladesh which were extracted and categorized into two waves. By analyzing these genome sequences, it was discovered that the wave-2 samples had a significantly greater average rate of mutation/sample (30.79%) than the wave-1 samples (12.32%). Wave-2 samples also had a higher frequency of deletion, and transversion events. During the first wave, the GR clade was the most predominant but it was replaced by the GH clade in the latter wave. The B.1.1.25 variant showed the highest frequency in wave-1 while in case of wave-2, the B.1.351.3 variant, was the most common one. A notable presence of the delta variant, which is currently at the center of concern, was also observed. Comparison of the Spike protein found in the reference and the 3 most common lineages found in Bangladesh namely, B.1.1.7, B.1.351, B.1.617 in terms of their ability to form stable complexes with ACE2 receptor revealed that B.1.617 had the potential to be more transmissible than others. Importantly, no indigenous variants have been detected so far which implies that the successful prevention of import of foreign variants can diminish the outbreak in the country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genomics/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Mutation/genetics , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
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