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1.
Bol. micol. (Valparaiso En linea) ; 36(2): 5-11, dic. 2021. ilus
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1841786

ABSTRACT

El síndrome de la uña verde o cloroniquia corresponde a la infección por Pseudomonas aeruginosa de una lámina ungueal dañada en pacientes con algún factor de riesgo identificable, siendo los más frecuentes la inmunosupresión, el ambiente húmedo constante y la patología ungueal preexistente. Su diagnóstico es relativamente sencillo si se logra observar la tríada característica de coloración verdosa de la lámina ungueal, paroniquia proximal crónica y onicolisis distal; en casos de duda diagnóstica se puede enviar una muestra de la uña afectada para cultivos o estudio histopatológico. El pilar de su tratamiento corresponde al uso de antibióticos tópicos o sistémicos en conjunto con medidas generales que protejan de la humedad. Es muy importante enfatizar la prevención de esta patología en el personal de salud, especialmente en el contexto del lavado de manos frecuente y riguroso implementado durante la pandemia COVID-19, ya que existen reportes de transmisión nosocomial de P. aeruginosa por profesionales de la salud con infección ungueal.(AU)


Green nail syndrome or chloronychia is the infection of a damaged nail plate by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a patient with an identifiable risk factor; the most frequently described are immunosuppression, a persistent moist environment and preexisting nail disease. Its diagnosis is relatively simple if the characteristic triad of green discoloration of the nail plate, chronic proximal paronychia and distal onycholysis can be observed, in cases of doubt a sample of the affected nail can be sent for cultures or histopathology. The cornerstone of treatment is the use of topical or systemic antibiotics along with measures to protect the nail from moisture. Prevention of this disease must be emphasized in health care personnel, especially in the context of frequent and rigorous handwashing practices implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic, since there are reports of nosocomial transmission of P. aeruginosaby health care professionals with nail infection.(AU)


Subject(s)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/pathogenicity , Pseudomonas Infections , Nails/microbiology , Pseudomonas Infections/diagnosis , Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy , Syndrome , Health Personnel , Onychomycosis , Onycholysis , COVID-19
2.
Lab Anim ; 56(2): 201-203, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832904
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809915

ABSTRACT

Bacterial co-infections may aggravate COVID-19 disease, and therefore being cognizant of other pathogens is imperative. We studied the types, frequency, antibiogram, case fatality rates (CFR), and clinical profiles of co-infecting-pathogens in 301 COVID-19 patients. Co-infection was 36% (n = 109), while CFR was 31.2% compared to 9.9% in non-co-infected patients (z-value = 3.1). Four bacterial species dominated, namely, multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (37%, n = 48), extremely drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (26%, n = 34), multidrug-resistant Eschericia. coli (18.6%, n = 24), and extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.5%, n = 11), in addition to other bacterial species (9.3%, n = 12). Increased co-infection of K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii was associated with increased death rates of 29% (n = 14) and 32% (n = 11), respectively. Klebsiella pneumoniae was equally frequent in respiratory and urinary tract infections (UTI), while E. coli mostly caused UTI (67%), and A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa dominated respiratory infections (38% and 45%, respectively). Co-infections correlated with advance in age: seniors ≥ 50 years (71%), young adults 21-49 years (25.6%), and children 0-20 years (3%). These findings have significant clinical implications in the successful COVID-19 therapies, particularly in geriatric management. Future studies would reveal insights into the potential selective mechanism(s) of Gram-negative bacterial co-infection in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections , COVID-19 , Coinfection , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections , Urinary Tract Infections , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteria , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/epidemiology , Escherichia coli , Female , Gram-Negative Bacteria , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Male , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Urinary Tract Infections/drug therapy
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809883

ABSTRACT

Healthcare-related infections are sustained by various bacteria and fungi. In recent years, various technologies have emerged for the sanitation of healthcare-related environments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a no-touch disinfection system that aerosolizes 5% hydrogen peroxide and 10% ethyl alcohol. After selecting an environment, the Total Bacterial Count and the Total Fungal Count in the air and on a surface of the room were determined to evaluate the effectiveness of the aerosolization system. In addition, sterile stainless-steel plates inoculated with S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and Aspergillus spp. isolated from hospitalized patients and reference strains were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. For each organism, three plates were used: A (cleaned), B (not cleaned), and C (control). The A plates were treated with non-ionic surfactant and the aerosolization system, the B plates were subjected to the aerosolization system, and the plates C were positioned outside the room that was sanitized. Following sanitization, air and surface sampling was conducted, after which, swabs were processed for bacterial and fungal enumeration. The results showed that the air sanitization system had good efficacy for both bacteria and fungi in the air and on stainless-steel plates, particularly for the A plates.


Subject(s)
Disinfectants , Disinfection , Aerosols , Bacteria , Delivery of Health Care , Disinfection/methods , Ethanol , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Stainless Steel , Staphylococcus aureus
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736897

ABSTRACT

The impact of globalization on beekeeping brings new economic, scientific, ecological and social dimensions to this field The present study aimed to evaluate the chemical compositions of eight propolis extracts from Romania, and their antioxidant action and antimicrobial activity against seven species of bacteria, including pathogenic ones: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The phenolic compounds, flavonoids and antioxidant activity of propolis extracts were quantified; the presence of flavones and aromatic acids was determined. Quercetin and rutin were identified by HPLC analysis and characterized using molecular descriptors. All propolis samples exhibited antibacterial effects, especially against P. aeruginosa and L. monocytogenes. A two-way analysis of variance was used to evaluate correlations among the diameters of the inhibition zones, the bacteria used and propolis extracts used. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the diameter of the inhibition zone was influenced by the strain type, but no association between the propolis origin and the microbial activity was found.


Subject(s)
Propolis , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Bacillus cereus , Escherichia coli , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Propolis/pharmacology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Romania
6.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 68(2): 142-146, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725074

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The vast majority of patients who hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 are given empirical antibiotic therapy. However, information on the frequency, microorganism species, and resistance rates of secondary bacterial infections in coronavirus disease 2019 patients are insufficient. We aimed to show the frequency of secondary infections and resistance conditions in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 hospitalized in the intensive care unit. METHODS: The results of tracheal aspirate culture, blood culture, and urine culture obtained from coronavirus disease 2019 patients - at least 2 days after their admission to the intensive care unit - were examined microbiologically. RESULTS: A total of 514 patients hospitalized in intensive care unit were included in our study. Tracheal aspirate, blood, or urine cultures were collected from 369 patients (71.8%). Bacterial reproduction was detected in at least one sample in 171 (33.3%) of all patients. The rate of respiratory tract infection and/or bloodstream infection was found to be 21%. Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in tracheal aspirate culture; Coagulase-negative staphylococci, K. pneumoniae, and A. baumannii in blood culture; and Escherichia coli, K. pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis in urine culture were the most common microorganisms. A. baumannii was resistant to most antibiotics except colistin and P. aeruginosa strains were resistant to most antibiotics except amikacin, colistin, cefepime, and imipenem. In K. pneumoniae, the highest meropenem sensitivity (73%) was observed; there was a strong resistance to most of the remaining antibiotics. CONCLUSIONS: We think that our study can be useful in choosing empirical antibiotic therapy in the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and reducing the mortality that may occur with secondary infection.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter baumannii , Bacterial Infections , COVID-19 , Coinfection , Pneumonia , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , SARS-CoV-2
7.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 14(7): 8718-8727, 2022 Feb 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683917

ABSTRACT

Transparent antimicrobial coatings can maintain the aesthetic appeal of surfaces and the functionality of a touch-screen while adding the benefit of reducing disease transmission. We fabricated an antimicrobial coating of silver oxide particles in a silicate matrix on glass. The matrix was grown by a modified Stöber sol-gel process with vapor-phase water and ammonia. A coating on glass with 2.4 mg of Ag2O per mm2 caused a reduction of 99.3% of SARS-CoV-2 and >99.5% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus compared to the uncoated glass after 1 h. We envisage that screen protectors with transparent antimicrobial coatings will find particular application to communal touch-screens, such as in supermarkets and other check-out or check-in facilities where a number of individuals utilize the same touch-screen in a short interval.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Oxides/chemistry , Silver Compounds/chemistry , Ammonia/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Glass/chemistry , Humans , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/pathogenicity , Oxides/pharmacology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Silicates/chemistry , Silver Compounds/pharmacology , Water/chemistry
8.
Microbiol Spectr ; 10(1): e0108021, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673361

ABSTRACT

The spread of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales (CPE) has dramatically impacted morbidity and mortality. COVID-19 pandemic has favored the selection of these microorganisms because of the excessive and prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and the outbreaks related to patient transfer between hospitals and inadequate personal protective equipment. Therefore, early CPE detection is considered essential for their control. We aimed to compare conventional phenotypic synergy tests and two lateral flow immunoassays for detecting carbapenemases in Enterobacterales and P. aeruginosa. We analyzed 100 carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli isolates, 80 Enterobacterales, and 20 P. aeruginosa (86 isolates producing KPC, NDM, OXA-48, IMP, and VIM carbapenemases and 14 non-carbapenemase-producing isolates). We performed a modified Hodge test, boronic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) synergy tests, and two lateral flow immunoassays: RESIST-4 O.K.N.V. (Coris Bioconcept) and NG Test Carba 5 (NG Biotech). In total, 76 KPC, seven VIM, one NDM, one OXA-48, and one isolate coproducing KPC + NDM enzymes were included. The concordance of different methods estimated by the Kappa index was 0.432 (standard error: 0.117), thus showing a high variability with the synergy tests with boronic acid and EDTA and reporting 16 false negatives that were detected by the two immunochromatographic methods. Co-production was only detected using immunoassays. Conventional phenotypic synergy tests with boronic acid and EDTA for detecting carbapenemases are suboptimal, and their routine use should be reconsidered. These tests depend on the degree of enzyme expression and the distance between disks. Lateral flow immunoassay tests are a rapid and cost-effective tool to detect and differentiate carbapenemases, improving clinical outcomes through targeted therapy and promoting infection prevention measures. IMPORTANCE Infections due to multidrug-resistant pathogens are a growing problem worldwide. The production of carbapenemases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacterales cause a high impact on the mortality of infected patients. Therefore, it is of great importance to have methods that allow the early detection of these multi-resistant microorganisms, achieving the confirmation of the type of carbapenemase present, with high sensitivity and specificity, with the aim of improving epidemiological control, dissemination, the clinical course to through targeted antibiotic therapy and promoting infection control in hospitals.


Subject(s)
Gammaproteobacteria/enzymology , Immunoassay/methods , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/enzymology , Carbapenems/metabolism , Carbapenems/pharmacology , Carbon-Nitrogen Ligases/metabolism , Drug Resistance , Immunoassay/standards , Phenotype , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects
9.
J Virol Methods ; 300: 114419, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636503

ABSTRACT

The new virus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARSCov-2) causing Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread quickly in several countries and it has become pandemic. Different types of clinical manifestations are attributed to this infection. Some mechanisms related to the infection regarding the immune response are not still elucidated. Herein we reported a case of a 66-years-old patient affected by myelodysplasia who was referred to our hospital because of clinical and radiological manifestations of viral pneumonia. The clinical course has become complicated due to bacterial secondary over-infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa during stay in internal medicine unit whilst a persistent positive oral and naso-pharyngeal swab test was reported up to 100 days of admission. The patient had a fast clinical and radiological worsening that led her to be admitted to an intensive care unit. Despite intubation and mechanical ventilation she died in a few days.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Retrospective Studies
10.
Microbiol Spectr ; 10(1): e0052221, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622001

ABSTRACT

Heme-containing peroxidases are widely distributed in the animal and plant kingdoms and play an important role in host defense by generating potent oxidants. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), the prototype of heme-containing peroxidases, exists in neutrophils and monocytes. MPO has a broad spectrum of microbial killing. The difficulty of producing MPO at a large scale hinders its study and utilization. This study aimed to overexpress recombinant human MPO and characterize its microbicidal activities in vitro and in vivo. A human HEK293 cell line stably expressing recombinant MPO (rMPO) was established as a component of this study. rMPO was overexpressed and purified for studies on its biochemical and enzymatic properties, as well as its microbicidal activities. In this study, rMPO was secreted into culture medium as a monomer. rMPO revealed enzymatic activity similar to that of native MPO. rMPO, like native MPO, was capable of killing a broad spectrum of microorganisms, including Gram-negative and -positive bacteria and fungi, at low nM levels. Interestingly, rMPO could kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria, making it very useful for treatment of nosocomial infections and mixed infections. The administration of rMPO significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality of murine lung infections induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In animal safety tests, the administration of 100 nM rMPO via tail vein did not result in any sign of toxic effects. Taken together, the data suggest that rMPO purified from a stably expressing human cell line is a new class of antimicrobial agents with the ability to kill a broad spectrum of pathogens, including bacteria and fungi with or without drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Over the past 2 decades, more than 20 new infectious diseases have emerged. Unfortunately, novel antimicrobial therapeutics are discovered at much lower rates. Infections caused by resistant microorganisms often fail to respond to conventional treatment, resulting in prolonged illness, greater risk of death, and high health care costs. Currently, this is best seen with the lack of a cure for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To combat such untreatable microorganisms, there is an urgent need to discover new classes of antimicrobial agents. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) plays an important role in host defense. The difficulty of producing MPO on a large scale hinders its study and utilization. We have produced recombinant MPO at a large scale and have characterized its antimicrobial activities. Most importantly, recombinant MPO significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality of murine pneumonia induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Our data suggest that recombinant MPO from human cells is a new class of antimicrobials with a broad spectrum of activity.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Peroxidase/pharmacology , Acute Disease , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/classification , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Infective Agents/toxicity , Candida albicans/drug effects , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Male , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Peroxidase/genetics , Peroxidase/therapeutic use , Peroxidase/toxicity , Pneumonia, Bacterial/drug therapy , Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/pharmacology , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , Recombinant Proteins/toxicity , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects
11.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 41(1): 53-62, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616163

ABSTRACT

There is relatively little contemporary information regarding clinical characteristics of patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia (PAB) in the community hospital setting. This was a retrospective, observational cohort study examining the clinical characteristics of patients with PAB across several community hospitals in the USA with a focus on the appropriateness of initial empirical therapy and impact on patient outcomes. Cases of PAB occurring between 2016 and 2019 were pulled from 8 community medical centers. Patients were classified as having either positive or negative outcome at hospital discharge. Several variables including receipt of active empiric therapy (AET) and the time to receiving AET were collected. Variables with a p value of < 0.05 in univariate analyses were included in a multivariable logistic regression model. Two hundred and eleven episodes of PAB were included in the analysis. AET was given to 81.5% of patients and there was no difference in regard to outcome (p = 0.62). There was no difference in the median time to AET in patients with a positive or negative outcome (p = 0.53). After controlling for other variables, age, Pitt bacteremia score ≥ 4, and septic shock were independently associated with a negative outcome. A high proportion of patients received timely, active antimicrobial therapy for PAB and time to AET did not have a significant impact on patient outcome.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteremia/drug therapy , Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Aged , Bacteremia/microbiology , Female , Hospitals, Community/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/genetics , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/isolation & purification , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/physiology , Retrospective Studies
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 714027, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581346

ABSTRACT

In the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) health crisis, one major challenge is to identify the susceptibility factors of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) in order to adapt the recommendations for populations, as well as to reduce the risk of COVID-19 development in the most vulnerable people, especially patients with chronic respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in the modulation of both immune responses and COVID-19 severity. SARS-CoV-2 infects the airway through the receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, and a host protease, transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2), plays a major role in SARS-CoV-2 infectivity. Here, we show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa increases TMPRSS2 expression, notably in primary AECs with deficiency of the ion channel CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Further, we show that the main component of P. aeruginosa flagella, the protein flagellin, increases TMPRSS2 expression in primary AECs and Calu-3 cells, through activation of Toll-like receptor-5 and p38 MAPK. This increase is particularly seen in Calu-3 cells deficient for CFTR and is associated with an intracellular increased level of SARS-CoV-2 infection, however, with no effect on the amount of virus particles released. Considering the urgency of the COVID-19 health crisis, this result may be of clinical significance for CF patients, who are frequently infected with and colonized by P. aeruginosa during the course of CF and might develop COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Cystic Fibrosis , Flagellin/metabolism , Pseudomonas Infections/complications , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Bacterial Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , Cells, Cultured , Humans , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism
13.
Science ; 372(6547): 1169-1175, 2021 06 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583231

ABSTRACT

Emergent resistance to all clinical antibiotics calls for the next generation of therapeutics. Here we report an effective antimicrobial strategy targeting the bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-mediated defense system. We identified cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) as the primary generator of H2S in two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and discovered small molecules that inhibit bacterial CSE. These inhibitors potentiate bactericidal antibiotics against both pathogens in vitro and in mouse models of infection. CSE inhibitors also suppress bacterial tolerance, disrupting biofilm formation and substantially reducing the number of persister bacteria that survive antibiotic treatment. Our results establish bacterial H2S as a multifunctional defense factor and CSE as a drug target for versatile antibiotic enhancers.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Cystathionine gamma-Lyase/antagonists & inhibitors , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydrogen Sulfide/metabolism , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/metabolism , Biofilms , Crystallography, X-Ray , Cystathionine gamma-Lyase/chemistry , Cystathionine gamma-Lyase/genetics , Cystathionine gamma-Lyase/metabolism , Drug Discovery , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Drug Synergism , Drug Tolerance , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Mice , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Models, Molecular , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Structure , Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy , Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/enzymology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/genetics , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/growth & development , Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry , Small Molecule Libraries/metabolism , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology , Staphylococcus aureus/enzymology , Staphylococcus aureus/genetics , Staphylococcus aureus/growth & development
14.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22543, 2021 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526103

ABSTRACT

Microbial contamination is one of the major dreadful problems that raises hospitalization, morbidity and mortality rates globally, which subsequently obstructs socio-economic progress. The continuous misuse and overutilization of antibiotics participate mainly in the emergence of microbial resistance. To circumvent such a multidrug-resistance phenomenon, well-defined nanocomposite structures have recently been employed. In the current study, a facile, novel and cost-effective approach was applied to synthesize Ag@Ag2O core-shell nanocomposites (NCs) via chemical method. Several techniques were used to determine the structural, morphological, and optical characteristics of the as-prepared NCs. XRD, Raman, FTIR, XPS and SAED analysis revealed a crystalline hybrid structure of Ag core and Ag2O shell. Besides, SEM and HRTEM micrographs depicted spherical nanoparticles with size range of 19-60 nm. Additionally, zeta potential and fluorescence spectra illustrated aggregated nature of Ag@Ag2O NCs by - 5.34 mV with fluorescence emission peak at 498 nm. Ag@Ag2O NCs exhibited higher antimicrobial, antibiofilm, and algicidal activity in dose-dependent behavior. Interestingly, a remarkable mycocidal potency by 50 µg of Ag@Ag2O NCs against Candida albican; implying promising activity against COVID-19 white fungal post-infections. Through assessing cytotoxicity, Ag@Ag2O NCs exhibited higher safety against Vero cells than bulk silver nitrate by more than 100-fold.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Biofilms/drug effects , Nanocomposites/chemistry , Oxides/chemistry , Silver Compounds/chemistry , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/chemical synthesis , Candida albicans/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorella vulgaris/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disinfectants/chemical synthesis , Disinfectants/chemistry , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects , Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects , Metal Nanoparticles/chemistry , Oxides/chemical synthesis , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Silver Compounds/chemical synthesis , Silver Nitrate/pharmacology , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Vero Cells
15.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(46): 54706-54714, 2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514382

ABSTRACT

Antimicrobial coatings are one method to reduce the spread of microbial diseases. Transparent coatings preserve the visual properties of surfaces and are strictly necessary for applications such as antimicrobial cell phone screens. This work describes transparent coatings that inactivate microbes within minutes. The coatings are based on a polydopamine (PDA) adhesive, which has the useful property that the monomer can be sprayed, and then the monomer polymerizes in a conformal film at room temperature. Two coatings are described (1) a coating where PDA is deposited first and then a thin layer of copper is grown on the PDA by electroless deposition (PDA/Cu) and (2) a coating where a suspension of Cu2O particles in a PDA solution is deposited in a single step (PDA/Cu2O). In the second coating, PDA menisci bind Cu2O particles to the solid surface. Both coatings are transparent and are highly efficient in inactivating microbes. PDA/Cu kills >99.99% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 99.18% of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in only 10 min and inactivates 99.98% of SARS-CoV-2 virus in 1 h. PDA/Cu2O kills 99.94% of P. aeruginosa and 96.82% of MRSA within 10 min and inactivates 99.88% of SARS-CoV-2 in 1 h.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Resistance, Microbial/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Surface Properties
16.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(3): e0028321, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501550

ABSTRACT

The Infectious Disease Surveillance of Pediatrics (ISPED) program was established in 2015 to monitor and analyze the trends of bacterial epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in children. Clinical bacterial isolates were collected from 11 tertiary care children's hospitals in China in 2016 to 2020. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using the Kirby-Bauer method or automated systems, with interpretation according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute 2019 breakpoints. A total of 288,377 isolates were collected, and the top 10 predominant bacteria were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic year, we observed a significant reduction in the proportion of respiratory tract samples (from 56.9% to 44.0%). A comparable reduction was also seen in the primary bacteria mainly isolated from respiratory tract samples, including S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and S. pyogenes. Multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) in children were commonly observed and presented higher rates of drug resistance than sensitive strains. The proportions of carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae (CRKP), carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB), carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA), and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were 19.7%, 46.4%%, 12.8%, and 35.0%, respectively. The proportions of CRKP, CRAB, and CRPA strains all showed decreasing trends between 2015 and 2020. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and CRPA gradually decreased with age, while CRAB showed the opposite trend with age. Both CRE and CRPA pose potential threats to neonates. MDROs show very high levels of AMR and have become an urgent threat to children, suggesting that effective monitoring of AMR and antimicrobial stewardship among children in China are required. IMPORTANCE AMR, especially that involving multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), is recognized as a global threat to human health; AMR renders infections increasingly difficult to treat, constituting an enormous economic burden and producing tremendous negative impacts on patient morbidity and mortality rates. There are many surveillance programs in the world to address AMR profiles and MDRO prevalence in humans. However, published studies evaluating the overall AMR rates or MDRO distributions in children are very limited or are of mixed quality. In this study, we showed the bacterial epidemiology and resistance profiles of primary pathogens in Chinese children from 2016 to 2020 for the first time, analyzed MDRO distributions with time and with age, and described MDROs' potential threats to children, especially low-immunity neonates. Our study will be very useful to guide antiinfection therapy in Chinese children, as well as worldwide pediatric patients.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/classification , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , China/epidemiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial/drug effects , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Humans , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Moraxella catarrhalis , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Staphylococcus epidermidis , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Streptococcus pyogenes
17.
Molecules ; 26(19)2021 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463769

ABSTRACT

Pristine high-density bulk disks of MgB2 with added hexagonal BN (10 wt.%) were prepared using spark plasma sintering. The BN-added samples are machinable by chipping them into desired geometries. Complex shapes of different sizes can also be obtained by the 3D printing of polylactic acid filaments embedded with MgB2 powder particles (10 wt.%). Our present work aims to assess antimicrobial activity quantified as viable cells (CFU/mL) vs. time of sintered and 3D-printed materials. In vitro antimicrobial tests were performed against the bacterial strains Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecium DSM 13590, and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212; and the yeast strain Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019. The antimicrobial effects were found to depend on the tested samples and microbes, with E. faecium being the most resistant and E. coli the most susceptible.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/drug effects , Boron Compounds/pharmacology , Fungi/drug effects , Magnesium Compounds/pharmacology , Candida parapsilosis/drug effects , Enterococcus faecalis/drug effects , Enterococcus faecium/drug effects , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Polyesters/pharmacology , Printing, Three-Dimensional , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects
18.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 51(12): e13687, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443255

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether behavioral precautions adopted during Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic also influenced the spreading and multidrug resistance (MDR) of ESKAPEEc (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii [AB], Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter spp and Escherichia Coli, [EC]) among Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. SUBJECTS/METHODS: We performed a single-center retrospective study in adult patients admitted to our COVID-19-free surgical ICU. Only patients staying in ICU for more than 48 hours were included. The ESKAPEEc infections recorded during the COVID-19 period (June 1, 2020 - February 28, 2021) and in the corresponding pre-pandemic period (June 1, 2019 - February 28, 2020) were compared. An interrupted time series analysis was performed to rule out possible confounders. RESULTS: Overall, 173 patients in the COVID-19 period and 132 in the pre-COVID-19 period were investigated. The ESKAPEEc infections were documented in 23 (13.3%) and 35 (26.5%) patients in the pandemic and the pre-pandemic periods, respectively (p = 0.005). Demographics, diagnosis, comorbidities, type of surgery, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, length of mechanical ventilation, hospital and ICU length of stay, ICU death rate, and 28-day hospital mortality were similar in the two groups. In comparison with the pre-pandemic period, no AB was recorded during COVID-19 period, (p = 0.017), while extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing EC infections significantly decreased (p = 0.017). Overall, the ESKAPEEc isolates during pandemic less frequently exhibited multidrug-resistant (p = 0.014). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that a robust adherence to hygiene measures together with human contact restrictions in a COVID-19 free ICU might also restrain the transmission of ESKAPEEc pathogens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Infection Control , Acinetobacter Infections/epidemiology , Acinetobacter Infections/microbiology , Acinetobacter Infections/transmission , Acinetobacter baumannii , Aged , Cross Infection/microbiology , Cross Infection/transmission , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Enterobacter , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/epidemiology , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/microbiology , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/transmission , Enterococcus faecium , Escherichia coli Infections/epidemiology , Escherichia coli Infections/microbiology , Escherichia coli Infections/transmission , Female , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/transmission , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/transmission , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Klebsiella Infections/epidemiology , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella Infections/transmission , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Male , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus , Middle Aged , Organizational Policy , Personal Protective Equipment , Pseudomonas Infections/epidemiology , Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology , Pseudomonas Infections/transmission , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/epidemiology , Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology , Staphylococcal Infections/transmission , Staphylococcus aureus , Visitors to Patients
20.
J Hosp Infect ; 119: 175-181, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415561

ABSTRACT

Increases in hospital-onset Klebsiella spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia rates in England were observed between August 2020 and February 2021 to the highest levels recorded since the start of mandatory surveillance in April 2017. Cases were extracted from England's mandatory surveillance database for key Gram-negative bloodstream infections. Incidence rates for hospital-onset bacteraemia cases increased from 8.9 (N=255) to 14.9 (N=394) per 100,000 bed-days for Klebsiella spp. [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.7, P<0.001], and from 4.9 (N=139) to 6.2 (N=164) per 100,000 bed-days for P. aeruginosa (IRR 1.3, P<0.001) (August 2020-February 2021). These incidence rates were higher than the average rates observed during the same period in the previous 3 years. These trends coincided with an increase in the percentage of hospital-onset bacteraemia cases that were also positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2.


Subject(s)
Bacteremia , COVID-19 , Bacteremia/epidemiology , England/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Klebsiella , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine
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