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1.
J Dermatol ; 49(3): 341-348, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735829

ABSTRACT

Patients suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis are prone to develop depressive symptoms. However, within the time constraints of dermatological clinics, depressive symptoms in psoriasis patients are often overlooked and thus underdiagnosed. The Two Questions Test may serve as a quick screening tool for an initial assessment of depressive burden in these patients. We evaluated its usefulness in the clinical context analyzing the records of patients starting systemic treatment for psoriasis with a selective interleukin (IL)23- or IL17A-inhibitor. In a total sample of N = 139 patients, baseline Two Questions Test scores were analyzed together with measures of psoriatic and psychiatric symptoms. In addition, the development of the Two Questions Test scores over the course of the first 28 weeks of treatment was assessed. No association was found between the Two Questions Test scores and skin symptoms measured by the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index and the visibility of skin lesions. However, skin related quality of life analyzed with the Dermatology Life Quality Index was associated with the Two Questions Test scores. In addition, the longitudinal analysis revealed improvement in Two Questions Test outcomes over the course of patients' treatment. These results indicate the Two Questions Test's usefulness both as an initial screening tool of depressive symptoms, as well as in its use as a sensitive tool for the repeated assessment of depressive symptoms in psoriasis patients.


Subject(s)
Psoriasis , Quality of Life , Chronic Disease , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Psoriasis/complications , Psoriasis/diagnosis , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(9)2021 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374459

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: Biological treatment is an important and effective therapy for psoriasis. During the COVID-19 pandemic, it remains unclear whether this type of therapy affects the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The aim of the study was to observe patients with psoriasis undergoing biological or other systemic treatment in relation to the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on the course of psoriasis and the COVID-19 disease itself. Materials and methods: A one-year observational study included 57 patients with diagnosed psoriasis who qualified for biological treatment and a group of 68 similar patients who were administered a different systemic treatment. Patients were analyzed monthly for psoriasis (including Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) assessment) and constantly for SARS-CoV-2 infection (telephone contact). Cases of COVID-19 were confirmed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) at the study center. Results: SARS-CoV-2 infection was confirmed by a positive Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) test in eight patients (14.0%) with psoriasis on biological therapy. None of the cases in this group required hospitalization for COVID-19. Similar data were obtained in the control group. Specifically, 11 (16%) patients were confirmed to be infected with SARS-CoV-2. These results were statistically comparable (p > 0.05). In the group of patients undergoing biological treatment, six (75%) of eight patients developed an exacerbation of psoriasis during SARS-CoV-2 infection, and similar results were noted in the control group, with eight (72%) patients experiencing an exacerbation of psoriasis. Conclusions: Patients with psoriasis who were administered biological treatment or other systemic therapy may experience a mild course of SARS-CoV-2 infection but might also experience a temporary exacerbation of skin lesions.


Subject(s)
Biological Products , COVID-19 , Psoriasis , Humans , Pandemics , Psoriasis/complications , Psoriasis/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Invest Dermatol ; 142(2): 355-363.e7, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340715

ABSTRACT

The need to rapidly spread information about the risk of COVID-19 in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis on biologics may have hampered the methodological rigor in published literature. We analyzed the quality of papers dealing with the risk and outcomes of COVID-19 in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis receiving biologic therapies. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to estimate the quality of the published studies. Moreover, to better contextualize results, specific internal and external validity items were further considered, that is, case definition, modality of COVID-19 assessment, evidence for self-selection of participants, percentage of dropout/nonparticipants, and sample size calculation. A total of 25 of 141 papers were selected. The median Newcastle-Ottawa Scale score was 47% for psoriasis and 44% for psoriatic arthritis, indicating an overall high risk of bias. A total of 37% of psoriasis and 44% of psoriatic arthritis studies included patients with suspected COVID-19 without a positive swab. No studies provided a formal sample size calculation. A significant risk of bias in all the published papers was found. Major issues to be considered in future studies are reduction of ascertainment bias, better consideration of nonresponse or participation bias, and provision of formal statistical power calculation.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic/complications , COVID-19/etiology , Psoriasis/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Risk
8.
Transfus Apher Sci ; 60(5): 103200, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284583

ABSTRACT

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is characterized by well-demarcated erythematous plaques with a silver scale. Although many new and emerging therapeutic agents are often sufficient to control the disease, there is still a need for alternative treatment options in challenging cases. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) has been applied to many T-cell-mediated diseases to restore immune homeostasis and treat psoriasis effectively. In this paper, we present a psoriasis patient who did not respond to methotrexate, narrowband ultraviolet B, or acitretin. Because of a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the patient had contraindications for cyclosporine, fumaric acid esters, and biologics but achieved remission with a total of 12 sessions of ECP in two and a half months. Although exacerbation was recorded after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) disease infection at the end of the first month, scores from the psoriasis area severity index (PASI) and dermatological life quality index (DLQI) were regressed significantly within two and a half months. ECP seems to provide an effective and rapid response for psoriasis and should be considered for psoriasis patients who fail to respond or have contraindications to existing treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/complications , Pandemics , Photopheresis , Psoriasis/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Acitretin/therapeutic use , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/etiology , Combined Modality Therapy , Contraindications, Drug , Cyclosporine/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Methotrexate/adverse effects , Methotrexate/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Nails/pathology , Psoriasis/complications , Psoriasis/pathology , Psoriasis/radiotherapy , Quality of Life , Severity of Illness Index , Ultraviolet Therapy
11.
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol ; 35(2): 281-317, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066706

ABSTRACT

This evidence- and consensus-based guideline on the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris was developed following the EuroGuiDerm Guideline and Consensus Statement Development Manual. The second part of the guideline provides guidance for specific clinical and comorbid situations such as treating psoriasis vulgaris patient with concomitant psoriatic arthritis, concomitant inflammatory bowel disease, a history of malignancies or a history of depression or suicidal ideation. It further holds recommendations for concomitant diabetes, viral hepatitis, disease affecting the heart or the kidneys as well as concomitant neurological disease. Advice on how to screen for tuberculosis and recommendations on how to manage patients with a positive tuberculosis test result are given. It further covers treatment for pregnant women or patients with a wish for a child in the near future. Information on vaccination, immunogenicity and systemic treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic is also provided.


Subject(s)
Psoriasis/complications , Psoriasis/therapy , Humans , Psoriasis/psychology
12.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 84(5): 1254-1268, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014571

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To update guidance regarding the management of psoriatic disease during the COVID-19 pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: The task force (TF) includes 18 physician voting members with expertise in dermatology, rheumatology, epidemiology, infectious diseases, and critical care. The TF was supplemented by nonvoting members, which included fellows and National Psoriasis Foundation staff. Clinical questions relevant to the psoriatic disease community were informed by inquiries received by the National Psoriasis Foundation. A Delphi process was conducted. RESULTS: The TF updated evidence for the original 22 statements and added 5 new recommendations. The average of the votes was within the category of agreement for all statements, 13 with high consensus and 14 with moderate consensus. LIMITATIONS: The evidence behind many guidance statements is variable in quality and/or quantity. CONCLUSIONS: These statements provide guidance for the treatment of patients with psoriatic disease on topics including how the disease and its treatments affect COVID-19 risk, how medical care can be optimized during the pandemic, what patients should do to lower their risk of getting infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (including novel vaccination), and what they should do if they develop COVID-19. The guidance is a living document that is continuously updated by the TF as data emerge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Biological Products/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Decision Making, Shared , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Psoriasis/complications , Risk Factors , United States/epidemiology
13.
G Ital Dermatol Venereol ; 155(5): 632-635, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966334

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of the pandemic Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by a novel coronavirus named Severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), affecting a high number of patients in Italy, forced a great number of doctors, even dermatologists, to work in the first lines in the dedicated departments. We analyzed the features and the incidence of dermatological issues emerged during the hospitalization due to COVID-19 and absent before. METHODS: All the SARS-CoV-2 positive patients hospitalized in Celio Military Hospital - COVID hub no-intensive care wards from March 16, 2020 until May 4, 2020 were evaluated by dermatologists several times during the hospital stay. RESULTS: Ninety-six patients (15 civilians and 81 Italian servicepeople) were enrolled: 34 (35.4%) patients developed cutaneous manifestations; 15 (16.0%) suffered from skin dryness; 5 (5.2%) irritant contact dermatitis; 4 (4.2%) seborrheic dermatitis; 4 (4.2%) morbilliform rashes; 3 (3.1%) petechial rashes and 3 (3.1%) widespread hives. CONCLUSIONS: A deeper knowledge of cutaneous manifestations in military and civilian hospitalized COVID-19 patients could suggest more effective treatments to win the battle against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitals, Military/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/etiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatitis/epidemiology , Dermatitis/etiology , Exanthema/epidemiology , Exanthema/etiology , Female , Humans , Ichthyosis/epidemiology , Ichthyosis/etiology , Inpatients , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Military Personnel , Psoriasis/complications , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Urticaria/epidemiology , Urticaria/etiology , Young Adult
16.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 83(6): 1704-1716, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744059

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance about management of psoriatic disease during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: A task force (TF) of 18 physician voting members with expertise in dermatology, rheumatology, epidemiology, infectious diseases, and critical care was convened. The TF was supplemented by nonvoting members, which included fellows and National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) staff. Clinical questions relevant to the psoriatic disease community were informed by questions received by the NPF. A Delphi process was conducted. RESULTS: The TF approved 22 guidance statements. The average of the votes was within the category of agreement for all statements. All guidance statements proposed were recommended, 9 with high consensus and 13 with moderate consensus. LIMITATIONS: The evidence behind many guidance statements is limited in quality. CONCLUSION: These statements provide guidance for the management of patients with psoriatic disease on topics ranging from how the disease and its treatments impact COVID-19 risk and outcome, how medical care can be optimized during the pandemic, what patients should do to lower their risk of getting infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and what they should do if they develop COVID-19. The guidance is intended to be a living document that will be updated by the TF as data emerge.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Organizations, Nonprofit/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Advisory Committees/standards , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Care/standards , Delphi Technique , Dermatology/standards , Epidemiology/standards , Humans , Infectious Disease Medicine/standards , Organizations, Nonprofit/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Psoriasis/complications , Psoriasis/immunology , Rheumatology/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
18.
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol ; 34(12): e776-e778, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706062
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