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1.
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol ; 88(3): 286-290, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1791403

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected every sphere of life including management of psoriasis. The availability of COVID-19 vaccines has given rise to hope and at the same time some apprehensions as well. With the general population becoming eligible for vaccination, there is some confusion, on the eligibility of patients with different medical conditions and patients on immunosuppressive or immunomodulating medications for COVID-19 vaccination. Dermatologists treating psoriasis patients frequently face questions from them, whether they can undergo coronavirus disease 2019 vaccination. A PUBMED search was performed using the following strategy: 'COVID-19' AND 'Vaccine' AND 'Psoriasis'. We also performed a PUBMED search using the following strategy: 'SARS-CoV-2' AND 'Vaccine' AND 'Psoriasis'. All articles irrespective of language and publication date were included to arrive at this position statement. This position statement deals with the safety, eligibility and modifications of treatment, if needed among psoriasis patients with regards to the coronavirus disease 2019 vaccines currently available in India.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psoriasis , Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , India/epidemiology , Psoriasis/diagnosis , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Psoriasis/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
2.
J Dermatol ; 49(6): 624-628, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752454

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on biologic treatment for psoriasis in Japan remains to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate changes in biologic treatment and patients' behavior of visiting our department, especially in psoriasis patients treated with biologics before and during the pandemic. Data were collected from medical records retrospectively. The numbers of new psoriasis patients before (2019) and during (2020) the pandemic were compared. Patients' behavior of visiting our department was evaluated. The number of new psoriasis patients who visited our department in 2020 decreased by 35.7% compared with that in 2019. The reduction rate of new patients with psoriasis vulgaris was 49.3%, whereas the numbers of new patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) were almost the same in 2019 and 2020. The number of patients who newly initiated biologics did not decrease in 2020 compared with that in 2019. As of January 1, 2020, 215 psoriasis patients were treated with biologics. Six patients (2.8%) discontinued biologics treatment possibly due to COVID-19 in 2020. Among 212 patients with good adherence to visiting our department in the previous year, 24 patients (11.3%) refrained from their visits for at least 1 month. In most cases, refrainment was observed in April and May when the first state of emergency was in effect in Japan. In conclusion, the COVID-19 pandemic hindered patients from visiting our department. However, its impact on patients who needed intensive care, such as patients with PsA and GPP, and psoriasis patients treated with biologics, was limited.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Biological Products , COVID-19 , Psoriasis , Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous , Acute Disease , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Psoriatic/epidemiology , Biological Products/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
3.
J Rheumatol ; 49(5): 531-536, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625905

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We assessed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine uptake among individuals with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) and the Ontario general population. METHODS: We studied all residents aged ≥ 16 years who were alive and enrolled in the Ontario Health Insurance Plan as of December 14, 2020, when vaccination commenced (n = 12,435,914). Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), psoriasis (PsO), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were identified using established disease-specific case definitions applied to health administrative data. Vaccination status was extracted from the provincial COVaxON registry. Weekly cumulative proportions of first and second doses up until October 3, 2021, were expressed as the vaccinated percentage of each disease group, compared to the general Ontario population, and stratified by age. RESULTS: By October 3, 2021, the cumulative percentage with at least 1 dose was 82.1% for the general population, 88.9% for those with RA, 87.4% for AS, 90.6% for PsA, 87.3% for PsO, and 87.0% for IBD. There was also a higher total cumulative percentage with 2 doses among IMIDs (83.8-88.2%) vs the general population (77.9%). The difference was also evident when stratifying by age. Individuals with IMIDs in the youngest age group initially had earlier uptake than the general population but remain the lowest age group with 2 doses (70.6% in the general population vs. 73.7-79.2% across IMID groups). CONCLUSION: While implementation of COVID-19 vaccination programs has differed globally, these Canadian estimates are the first to reassuringly show higher COVID-19 vaccine uptake among individuals with IMIDs.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Psoriasis , Spondylitis, Ankylosing , Arthritis, Psoriatic/epidemiology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/epidemiology , Male , Ontario/epidemiology , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Spondylitis, Ankylosing/epidemiology , Vaccination
4.
Br J Dermatol ; 186(1): 59-68, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Data on treatment exposures for psoriasis and poor COVID-19 outcomes are limited. OBJECTIVES: To assess the risk of hospitalization or in-hospital mortality due to COVID-19 by treatment exposure in patients with psoriasis. METHODS: All adults with psoriasis registered in the French national health-insurance (Système National des Données de Santé, SNDS) database between 2008 and 2019 were eligible. Two study periods were considered: 15 February to 30 June 2020 and 1 October 2020 to 31 January 2021, the first and second waves of the COVID-19 pandemic in France, respectively. Patients were classified according to their baseline treatment: biologics, nonbiologics, topicals or no treatment. The primary endpoint was hospitalization for COVID-19 using Cox models with inverse probability of treatment weighting. The secondary endpoint was in-hospital mortality due to COVID-19. RESULTS: We identified 1 326 312 patients with psoriasis (mean age 59 years; males, 48%). During the first study period, 3871 patients were hospitalized for COVID-19 and 759 (20%) died; during the second period 3603 were hospitalized for COVID-19 and 686 (19%) died. In the propensity score-weighted Cox models, risk of hospitalization for COVID-19 was associated with exposure to topicals or nonbiologics [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval): 1·11 (1·04-1·20) and 1·27 (1·09-1·48), respectively] during the first period, and with all exposure types, during the second period. None of the exposure types was associated with in-hospital mortality due to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Systemic treatments for psoriasis (including biologics) were not associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality due to COVID-19. These results support maintaining systemic treatment for psoriasis during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psoriasis , Adult , Cohort Studies , France/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Psoriasis/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(1): 39-47, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526381

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adherence to treatment is important in chronic dermatological diseases. There are limited data regarding the adherence to treatment in patients with psoriasis during the COVID-19 pandemic. AIMS: We aimed to determine the rates of adherence to systemic treatments in patients with psoriasis and to identify the causes of non-adherence during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional multicenter study from May 2021 to August 2021. A questionnaire including items regarding sociodemographic characteristics of the patients, disease-related characteristics, and treatment-related characteristics were filled out by the physicians. The Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI), Hospital Anxiety, and Depression Scale, and the Dermatology Life Quality Index were calculated. The rate of adherence and non-adherence to treatment and reasons for non-adherence to treatment were examined. RESULTS: A total of 342 patients with psoriasis were included (182 male/160 female) in the study. The mean age of the patients was 45.9 ± 14.2 years. The average duration of psoriasis was 192 ± 134.7 months. While the rate of adherence to treatment was 57.6%, the rate of non-adherence to treatment was 42.4%. There were no significant differences with respect to adherence to treatment in comparison with oral and injection-therapy groups. The most frequent reasons for non-adherence to treatment were inability to go to the hospital (19.2%), concern about the COVID-19 infection (16.3%), discontinuation of the treatment by the doctor (13.7%), inability to reach the doctor (7.3%), and inability to have access to the medication (7.3%). CONCLUSION: Adherence to oral and injection therapies was fairly high among our patients with psoriasis during the COVID-19 pandemic. Psoriasis severity and duration of medication use had a negative impact on adherence to treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psoriasis , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(Special Issue): 1381-1387, 2021 Aug.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524927

ABSTRACT

Currently, the ongoing pandemic of the novel coronavirus infection is still a major public health problem worldwide. The questions of immunosuppressive therapy of patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, the possibility of vaccination against the background of the use of genetically engineered drugs remain open. The article is of an overview nature and includes up-to-date information on the feasibility and safety of the use of genetically engineered biological drugs in patients with psoriasis in a pandemic (COVID-19). According to the international recommendations of the National Psoriasis Foundation COVID-19 Task Force expert group, treatment of psoriasis and/or PsA does not significantly alter the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and does not lead to worse prognosis of COVID-19. Therefore, patients not infected with SARS-CoV-2 should continue biological or other systemic therapy for psoriasis and/or PsA. According to a registry from 25 countries, hospitalization with SARS-CoV-2 infection was more common in patients receiving nonbiological systemic therapy than in patients receiving BAs. Thus, genetically engineered biological drugs do not appear to cause an increased risk of coronavirus infection and do not determine a more severe course. With regard to vaccination of patients with psoriasis, many issues require further study. According to international agreements, vaccination is not contraindicated in patients with psoriatic disease. However, there is still insufficient data on how the treatment of psoriatic disease affects vaccination. Avoiding COVID-19 or reducing the severity of infection following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination is thought to far outweigh any risk directly related to vaccination complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psoriasis , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Pandemics , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Psoriasis/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol ; 17(11): 1211-1220, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483218

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In daily practice management of psoriasis, evaluation of risk factors for infections is having a growing influence. Indeed, in psoriatic patients, risk of infections may be due to psoriasis itself, immunomodulatory therapy, and comorbidities that may increase this risk and patient hospitalization. AREAS COVERED: Given the greater understanding of psoriasis pathogenesis and the increasing number of treatment options, it is particularly important to customize therapy according to each, single patient; psoriasis features and comorbidities are also essential to tailor treatment goals. EXPERT OPINION: In this perspective, the current knowledge on the infectious risk in psoriatic patient, related to comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary, to 'special populations,' to chronic infections, such as latent tuberculosis, chronic hepatitis B and C, and HIV, and to the most recent Covid-19 pandemic scenario, is reviewed and discussed in order to suggest the most appropriate approach and achieve the best available therapeutic option.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Psoriasis/therapy , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Pandemics , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology
11.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(10): e2129639, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473778

ABSTRACT

Importance: Although tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors are widely prescribed globally because of their ability to ameliorate shared immune pathways across immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs), the impact of COVID-19 among individuals with IMIDs who are receiving TNF inhibitors remains insufficiently understood. Objective: To examine the association between the receipt of TNF inhibitor monotherapy and the risk of COVID-19-associated hospitalization or death compared with other commonly prescribed immunomodulatory treatment regimens among adult patients with IMIDs. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study was a pooled analysis of data from 3 international COVID-19 registries comprising individuals with rheumatic diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis from March 12, 2020, to February 1, 2021. Clinicians directly reported COVID-19 outcomes as well as demographic and clinical characteristics of individuals with IMIDs and confirmed or suspected COVID-19 using online data entry portals. Adults (age ≥18 years) with a diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, or psoriasis were included. Exposures: Treatment exposure categories included TNF inhibitor monotherapy (reference treatment), TNF inhibitors in combination with methotrexate therapy, TNF inhibitors in combination with azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine therapy, methotrexate monotherapy, azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine monotherapy, and Janus kinase (Jak) inhibitor monotherapy. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was COVID-19-associated hospitalization or death. Registry-level analyses and a pooled analysis of data across the 3 registries were conducted using multilevel multivariable logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics and accounting for country, calendar month, and registry-level correlations. Results: A total of 6077 patients from 74 countries were included in the analyses; of those, 3215 individuals (52.9%) were from Europe, 3563 individuals (58.6%) were female, and the mean (SD) age was 48.8 (16.5) years. The most common IMID diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis (2146 patients [35.3%]) and Crohn disease (1537 patients [25.3%]). A total of 1297 patients (21.3%) were hospitalized, and 189 patients (3.1%) died. In the pooled analysis, compared with patients who received TNF inhibitor monotherapy, higher odds of hospitalization or death were observed among those who received a TNF inhibitor in combination with azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine therapy (odds ratio [OR], 1.74; 95% CI, 1.17-2.58; P = .006), azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine monotherapy (OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.30-2.61; P = .001), methotrexate monotherapy (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.57-2.56; P < .001), and Jak inhibitor monotherapy (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.21-2.73; P = .004) but not among those who received a TNF inhibitor in combination with methotrexate therapy (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.85-1.63; P = .33). Similar findings were obtained in analyses that accounted for potential reporting bias and sensitivity analyses that excluded patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis based on symptoms alone. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, TNF inhibitor monotherapy was associated with a lower risk of adverse COVID-19 outcomes compared with other commonly prescribed immunomodulatory treatment regimens among individuals with IMIDs.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/drug therapy , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Adult , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Drug Therapy, Combination/adverse effects , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Dermatol ; 48(12): 1907-1912, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434603

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has affected both daily life and medical care; therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the use of biologics for inflammatory skin diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic in our hospital. The observation period was between 1 January 2020 and 23 February 2021. In this study, we enrolled 227 patients with psoriasis, six patients with palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP), 69 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), and five patients with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Bioswitch was performed in 25 patients with psoriasis (11.0%). Biologics were discontinued in 14 patients with psoriasis (6.2%), 10 patients with AD (14.5%), and four patients with HS (80.0%); they were not discontinued in patients with PPP. The introduction of biologics was observed in 27 patients with psoriasis (11.9%), four patients with PPP (66.7%), 33 patients with AD (47.8%), and two patients with HS (40.0%). The use of telephone consultations was observed in four patients with psoriasis and two patients with AD. One patient, who received adalimumab for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, suffered from COVID-19 and recovered after a mild course. In conclusion, we report our experience regarding the use of biologic drugs for inflammatory skin diseases. The use of biologics seemed safe for use amidst COVID-19 infection during the observation period; however, further observation on a larger number of patients is required to confirm the risks and benefits of biologic use in the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
Biological Products , COVID-19 , Psoriasis , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Humans , Pandemics , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Psoriasis/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Photochem Photobiol Sci ; 20(9): 1239-1242, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1375868

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, social isolation measures were imposed in Brazil to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), requiring health services to implement contingency plans. The main objective of the study was to verify the status of the disease, self-reported by patients who discontinued phototherapy, during a period of social isolation. METHODS: All patients receiving phototherapy at the Santa Casa de Porto Alegre, Brazil, prior to the implementation of social distancing measures were eligible for inclusion in the study. 86 patients answered a questionnaire during a medical evaluation. RESULTS: 95% of patients who stopped phototherapy reported a worsening of disease status. Only 19% of patients continued to attend phototherapy sessions during the social isolation period. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic led most patients to stop phototherapy, resulting in the perception of increased disease severity in an outpatient sample in southern Brazil.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Phototherapy , Treatment Refusal , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous/epidemiology , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous/therapy , Male , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Psoriasis/therapy , Severity of Illness Index , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vitiligo/epidemiology , Vitiligo/therapy
15.
Dermatol Ther ; 34(6): e15113, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373808

ABSTRACT

Since the emergence of the new coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, there has been a concern for the patients with chronic autoimmune diseases including dermatological conditions over the potential exacerbation of these underlying conditions after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV2). We performed a systematic review to evaluate presentations, postinfection change in the manifestation, diagnosis, and management of flare-ups of underlying dermatologic disease in patients with COVID-19. A total of 17 articles were recovered reporting on flare-ups of dermatological disease including pemphigus vulgaris, psoriasis, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau, systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma, and Sézary syndrome (SS). Out of these, psoriasis and alopecia areata were the most common conditions. However, most cases of psoriasis could have been attributed to either antimalarial agents that were initially used for the treatment of COVID-19 or discontinuation of treatment following SARS-CoV2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psoriasis , Humans , Pandemics , Psoriasis/epidemiology , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 20(10): 3098-3102, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345996

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since March 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been ongoing all around the world with a wide range of clinical course including asymptomatic cases to severe and fatal respiratory tract disease. Patients on immunosuppressive treatments were predicted to be more susceptible to COVID-19. AIMS: It was aimed to assess treatment continuity, the course of psoriasis and the course and clinical features of COVID-19 in patients treated with biological agents for psoriasis at the early initial period of COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS/METHODS: Patients treated with biological agents for psoriasis at our institute were contacted by phone between 1 and 10 July 2020 and fulfilled a questionnaire about their continuity to psoriasis treatments, clinical course of psoriasis, and any suspicion/diagnosis of COVID-19. RESULTS: A total of 106 patients, 41 females and 65 males, were enrolled. Mean age of the patients was 46.1 ± 12.1 years (range: 19-77). Median duration of psoriasis was 18 years (min-max: 1 month-51 years). Twenty-four patients (22.6%) were using tumor necrosis alpha inhibitors (ETA:1, IFX:19, ADA:4), whereas 82 patients (77.4%) were using interleukin (IL) 12/23 or IL-17 inhibitors (UST:48, SECU:30, IXE:4). Seventy-six patients (71.7%) continued the treatment, whereas 30 patients (28.3%) interrupted the treatment voluntarily. Twenty out of 30 patients (66.6%) who interrupted the treatment had an exacerbation of psoriasis. None of the patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 in the study period. CONCLUSION: Patients with psoriasis who received biological therapy continued their treatment at a high rate during the early period of the COVID-19 pandemic. No COVID-19 diagnosis was made among patients whether they continued or discontinued treatment. Recurrence and exacerbation of psoriasis in a significant proportion of patients who interrupted treatment and absence of COVID-19 diagnosis in each group support the importance and safety of continuity of biological treatments for psoriasis in COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
Biological Products , COVID-19 , Psoriasis , Adult , Aged , Attitude , Biological Factors/therapeutic use , Biological Products/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Psoriasis/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
20.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 22(5): 709-718, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248759

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of immune-related conditions on the outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is poorly understood. Determinants of COVID-19 outcomes among patients with psoriasis are yet to be established. OBJECTIVE: Th objective of this study was to characterize a large cohort of patients with psoriasis with COVID-19 and to identify predictors of COVID-19-associated hospitalization and mortality. METHODS: A population-based nested case-control study was performed using the computerized database of Clalit Health Services, Israel. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence (CIs) of predictors for COVID-19-associated hospitalization and mortality. RESULTS: The study population included 3151 patients with psoriasis who tested positive for COVID-19. Subclinical COVID-19 infection occurred in 2818 (89.4%) of the patients while 122 (3.9%), 71 (2.3%), 123 (3.9%), and 16 (0.5%) of the patients experienced a mild, moderate, severe, and critical disease, respectively. Overall, 332 (10.5%) patients were hospitalized and 50 (1.6%) patients died because of COVID-19 complications. Intake of methotrexate independently predicted COVID-19-associated hospitalization (adjusted OR 2.30; 95% CI 1.11-4.78; p = 0.025). Use of biologic agents was not associated with COVID-19-associated hospitalization (OR 0.75; 95% CI 0.32-1.73; p = 0.491) or mortality (OR 0.85; 95% CI 0.12-6.21; p = 0.870). Older age, the presence of comorbid cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and chronic renal failure independently predicted both COVID-19-associated hospitalization and mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The use of oral methotrexate was associated with an increased odds of COVID-associated hospitalization, whereas the use of biologic drugs was not associated with worse outcomes of COVID-19 among patients with psoriasis.


Subject(s)
Biological Products/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Methotrexate/therapeutic use , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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