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1.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 52-55, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300690

ABSTRACT

Since the beginning of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, medical professionals have been overwhelmed by questions beyond the infection itself. In dermatology practice, clinicians have been facing difficulties about the management of chronic immune-mediated skin diseases. Issues arose, such as the grade of immunosuppression or immunomodulation, discontinuation or modification of treatment, and initiation of new treatments. In this comprehensive review, we present the current evidence about the course and management of chronic inflammatory dermatoses during the COVID-19 pandemic, focusing on psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and hidradenitis suppurativa.


Subject(s)
Biological Products/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Atopic/drug therapy , Hidradenitis Suppurativa/drug therapy , Psoriasis/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Chronic Disease , Dermatitis, Atopic/immunology , Hidradenitis Suppurativa/immunology , Humans , Prognosis , Psoriasis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Lancet ; 397(10281): 1301-1315, 2021 04 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1161993

ABSTRACT

Psoriasis is a common, chronic papulosquamous skin disease occurring worldwide, presenting at any age, and leading to a substantial burden for individuals and society. It is associated with several important medical conditions, including depression, psoriatic arthritis, and cardiometabolic syndrome. Its most common form, chronic plaque or psoriasis vulgaris, is a consequence of genetic susceptibility, particularly in the presence of the HLA-C*06:02 risk allele, and of environmental triggers such as streptococcal infection, stress, smoking, obesity, and alcohol consumption. There are several phenotypes and research has separated pustular from chronic plaque forms. Immunological and genetic studies have identified IL-17 and IL-23 as key drivers of psoriasis pathogenesis. Immune targeting of these cytokines and of TNFα by biological therapies has revolutionised the care of severe chronic plaque disease. Psoriasis cannot currently be cured, but management should aim to minimise physical and psychological harm by treating patients early in the disease process, identifying and preventing associated multimorbidity, instilling lifestyle modifications, and employing a personalised approach to treatment.


Subject(s)
Psoriasis/physiopathology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Phenotype , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Psoriasis/genetics , Psoriasis/immunology , Risk Factors
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 662266, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247862

ABSTRACT

IL-36 is a member of the interleukin 1 cytokine family, which is currently experiencing a renaissance due to the growing understanding of its context-dependent roles and advances in our understanding of the inflammatory response. The immunological role of IL-36 has revealed its profound and indispensable functional roles in psoriasis, as well as in several inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and cancer. More recently, an increasing body of evidence suggests that IL-36 plays a crucial role in viral, bacterial and fungal infections. There is a growing interest as to whether IL-36 contributes to host protective immune responses against infection as well as the potential implications of IL-36 for the development of new therapeutic strategies. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in understanding cellular expression, regulatory mechanisms and biological roles of IL-36 in infectious diseases, which suggest more specific strategies to maneuver IL-36 as a diagnostic or therapeutic target, especially in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Communicable Diseases/immunology , Infections/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Interleukin-1/immunology , Psoriasis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy
8.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e14516, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917741

ABSTRACT

Since the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, there has been an open debate on the impact of biological drugs used in the treatment of psoriasis. To define whether patients under treatment with biologics suffer from increased morbidity and mortality from COVID-19, compared to psoriatic patients treated only with topical drugs, we designed an observational monocentric prevalence study recording the personal and clinical data of psoriatic patients, with focus on the presentation of signs and symptoms related to COVID-19 in the period of time ranging from 1 January 2020 to 31 May 2020. A total of 180 patients were enrolled into two groups: 100 patients in the topical therapy group and 80 patients in the biological therapy group. No statistically significant difference was found between the groups regarding the prevalence of COVID-19 infection and symptoms at a bivariable analysis with adjustment for confounders. In conclusion, psoriatic patients under treatment with biologics do not seem to be more susceptible to COVID-19 compared to other psoriatic patients and we suggest not interrupting treatment with biological drugs, even in areas suffering from active outbreaks of the disease.


Subject(s)
Biological Products/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologic Agents/administration & dosage , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Biological Products/adverse effects , COVID-19/immunology , Dermatologic Agents/adverse effects , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Psoriasis/immunology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
10.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e14472, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894746

ABSTRACT

During COVID-19 outbreak hospitals were congested and infliximab was interrupted. Thus, we performed this observational study to understand the consequent burden of complications in these special cluster of psoriatic patients. We followed up 56 psoriatic patients who were receiving Infliximab treatment by telephone. The majority of patients had lesions exacerbation, accompanied by anxiety emotion. It is suggested that reserving common drugs for psoriasis at home is necessary. Besides, telemedicine should be advocated as a main medical visit mode during the outbreak of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatologic Agents/therapeutic use , Health Services Accessibility , Infliximab/therapeutic use , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Telemedicine , Adult , Dermatologic Agents/supply & distribution , Drug Substitution , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psoriasis/diagnosis , Psoriasis/immunology , Treatment Outcome
12.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 83(5): 1523-1526, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-866785
13.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 83(6): 1704-1716, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744059

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance about management of psoriatic disease during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: A task force (TF) of 18 physician voting members with expertise in dermatology, rheumatology, epidemiology, infectious diseases, and critical care was convened. The TF was supplemented by nonvoting members, which included fellows and National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) staff. Clinical questions relevant to the psoriatic disease community were informed by questions received by the NPF. A Delphi process was conducted. RESULTS: The TF approved 22 guidance statements. The average of the votes was within the category of agreement for all statements. All guidance statements proposed were recommended, 9 with high consensus and 13 with moderate consensus. LIMITATIONS: The evidence behind many guidance statements is limited in quality. CONCLUSION: These statements provide guidance for the management of patients with psoriatic disease on topics ranging from how the disease and its treatments impact COVID-19 risk and outcome, how medical care can be optimized during the pandemic, what patients should do to lower their risk of getting infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and what they should do if they develop COVID-19. The guidance is intended to be a living document that will be updated by the TF as data emerge.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Organizations, Nonprofit/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Advisory Committees/standards , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Care/standards , Delphi Technique , Dermatology/standards , Epidemiology/standards , Humans , Infectious Disease Medicine/standards , Organizations, Nonprofit/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Psoriasis/complications , Psoriasis/immunology , Rheumatology/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
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