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2.
Clin Teach ; 18(6): 641-649, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441854

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mental health is an important global issue, and doctors in training need a grounding in the principles of psychiatry. Undergraduate clinical placements in psychiatry can develop core knowledge and skills as well as challenging stigma towards mental illness. The onset of the coronavirus pandemic saw disruption to undergraduate clinical placements. In a U.K. medical school, th e authors were tasked with transforming a 6-week clinical placement in psychiatry into a primarily online course. APPROACH: A 4-week online course was developed in preparation for a condensed clinical placement. A range of resources were drawn upon to address key learning objectives and to engage students in broader thinking about mental health. These included videos and blogs describing personal experiences of mental illness, as well as interviews with prominent psychiatrists. Peer- and tutor-led sessions complemented these self-directed elements and reduced social isolation. EVALUATION: Sixty-seven students undertook the course, supported by eight consultant tutors. The content and structure of the course were highly rated; however, students indicated that peer group activities could benefit from further development. Students felt prepared for clinical placements and performed equally well in summative written examinations. Feedback indicated the development of positive attitudes towards mental health and illness. IMPLICATIONS: This course demonstrates how, even when clinical contact is challenged, a strong focus can be maintained on social elements of learning and patients' experiences of mental illness. This approach provides opportunities to develop essential knowledge and skills alongside broader attitudinal learning that may have a de-stigmatising effect.


Subject(s)
Psychiatry , Students, Medical , Humans , Learning , Pandemics , Psychiatry/education , Schools, Medical , Teaching
3.
BMJ Open Qual ; 10(3)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403081

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Despite an evidence base demonstrating simulation to be an effective medical education tool, it is not commonly used in postgraduate psychiatry training as it is in other medical specialties. OBJECTIVE: This paper outlines the development and effectiveness of a hybrid-virtual simulation-based workshop designed to improve patient care by improving clinical skills of non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) in detecting and managing rare and complex psychiatric emergencies. METHODS: Three clinical vignettes based on near-miss psychiatric cases were developed by a multidisciplinary team of physicians and nurses in psychiatry and experts in simulation-based medical education. The workshop, 'SafePsych' was delivered in a simulation laboratory while and broadcast via Zoom video-conferencing platform to observers. Debriefing followed each clinical scenario. Participants completed preworkshop and postworkshop questionnaires to evaluate clinical knowledge. RESULTS: The workshop was attended by consultants (n=12) and NCHDs in psychiatry and emergency medicine (n=19), and psychiatric nurses (n=5). In the psychiatry NCHD group, test scores significantly improved following the workshop (p<0.001). There were significant improvements in the test scores with a mean difference of 2.56 (SD 1.58, p<0.001). Feedback from participants and observers was positive, with constructive appraisals to improve the virtual element of the workshop. CONCLUSION: Simulation-based training is effective in teaching high risk, rare complex psychiatric cases to psychiatry NCHDs. Further exploration of the learning needs of nursing staff is required. Future workshop delivery is feasible in the COVID-19 environment and beyond, using a virtual element to meet social distancing requirements while enhancing the reach of the training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychiatry , Simulation Training , Humans , Patient Safety , Psychiatry/education , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Australas Psychiatry ; 29(3): 361-364, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249517

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The clinical teaching of psychiatry to medical students throughout the COVID-19 pandemic has presented opportunities for support, engagement and learning above and beyond usual practice. Like other teaching faculties, we needed to quickly adapt the course material to an online platform. However, for psychiatric teaching, it was also essential to find alternatives to patient interviewing, and to provide support and containment in uncertain times. We aim to describe our philosophical stance and framework for the delivery of our online course. CONCLUSIONS: Key components in the delivery of our modified course were the transition to online learning and assessment, developing a suite of surrogate clinical learning experiences, using simulated patients for online interviewing, and attention to student well-being whilst providing a supportive and contained environment for student learning. Supportive leadership and good communication assisted the teaching staff to deliver the course during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Interview, Psychological , Psychiatry/education , Students, Medical , Telecommunications , Adult , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Interview, Psychological/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Telecommunications/organization & administration , Young Adult
8.
Riv Psichiatr ; 56(2): 74-84, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202081

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: During the current covid-19 pandemic, healthcare students had to stop their face-to-face attendance at medical colleges and universities. This condition has resulted in a change in how learning and assessment of psychiatric and interprofessional practice occur. The pandemic has also increased clinical mentors' need to follow their mentees' educational progress via virtual technology, including smartphone-based educational apps. The aim of the study is to propose a model in psychiatric and medical interprofessional practice e-assessment. METHODS: In this study, 228 undergraduate healthcare students underwent a training period in interprofessional practice across specialties being assessed by Ecological Momentary e-Assessment (EMeA), and consisting of ongoing or before/after Interprofessional Education (IPE) learning evaluations with the assistance of an IPE-app linked to online surveys. The Goodness of Fit Test Chi-square and t-test statistics analyzed the data. RESULTS: Surveys during, at entry and exit points in IPE captured increased percentages of learners, specifically, reporting high patient satisfaction with interprofessional teams (c2=22.54; p<.01), learners experiencing very good quality of care when delivered by interprofessional teams (c2=30.02; p<.01) assessed by distance technology, and learners selecting less frequently peers from the same clinical background when support was needed in patient care (c2=19.84; p<.01). CONCLUSIONS: Contextual assessment (in the real-time and real-world scenario) of IPE learning moments via EMeA shows its value and applicability during the current covid-19 pandemic when the assessment of learning cannot occur face-to-face between learners and teachers. All healthcare students, including those on psychiatric rotations, could log in their progress, self-reflective assessments, and responses to coordinated care in interprofessional teams, without needing direct contact with their clinical tutors, and while treating patients with mental and physical illnesses, also including covid-19 positive patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interprofessional Education , Psychiatry/education , Humans , Mobile Applications , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
J Subst Abuse Treat ; 121: 108157, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997211

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19) pandemic emerged at a time of substantial investment in the United States substance use service infrastructure. A key component of this fiscal investment was funding for training and technical assistance (TA) from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to newly configured Technology Transfer Centers (TTCs), including the Addiction TTCs (ATTC Network), Prevention TTCs (PTTC Network), and the Mental Health TTCs (MHTTC Network). SAMHSA charges TTCs with building the capacity of the behavioral health workforce to provide evidence-based interventions via locally and culturally responsive training and TA. This commentary describes how, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, TTCs rapidly adapted to ensure that the behavioral health workforce had continuous access to remote training and technical assistance. TTCs use a conceptual framework that differentiates among three types of technical assistance: basic, targeted, and intensive. We define each of these types of TA and provide case examples to describe novel strategies that the TTCs used to shift an entire continuum of capacity building activities to remote platforms. Examples of innovations include online listening sessions, virtual process walkthroughs, and remote "live" supervision. Ongoing evaluation is needed to determine whether virtual TA delivery is as effective as face-to-face delivery or whether a mix of virtual and face-to-face delivery is optimal. The TTCs will need to carefully balance the benefits and challenges associated with rapid virtualization of TA services to design the ideal hybrid delivery model following the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Workforce , Psychiatry/education , Substance-Related Disorders/rehabilitation , Teaching , Virtual Reality , Behavior, Addictive/rehabilitation , Humans , United States
18.
Psychodyn Psychiatry ; 48(3): 259-270, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808784

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is currently ravaging health systems across the world. Psychiatric trainees are at risk of exposure to patients with COVID-19 given their clinical roles in emergency and inpatient psychiatric settings. This article represents a case study of group dynamics in which we reflect on our own experience as psychiatric residents at a Boston-area hospital system in the era of COVID-19 and apply Wilfred Bion's concepts of the "work group" and the "basic assumption group" processes of group operation. We assess dynamics between trainees and administrative leadership both at baseline and in the current pandemic. Since navigation through crises is more effective if group leadership recognizes and responds to basic assumption behaviors, we propose suggestions to enable health system administration to successfully lead health care organizations through periods of societal turmoil. We posit that these principles apply across settings, specialties, and provider types. In addition, we use our observations to indicate future directions for expanding Bion's theories in the contemporary context.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Internship and Residency , Leadership , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Psychiatry/education , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Group Processes , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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