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1.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 85(4): e67-e69, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860999

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a new pandemic, and its impact by HIV status is unknown. National reporting does not include gender identity; therefore, data are absent on the impact of COVID-19 on transgender people, including those with HIV. Baseline data from the American Cohort to Study HIV Acquisition Among Transgender Women in High Risk Areas (LITE) Study provide an opportunity to examine pre-COVID factors that may increase vulnerability to COVID-19-related harms among transgender women. SETTING: Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Miami, New York City, Washington, DC. METHODS: Baseline data from LITE were analyzed for demographic, psychosocial, and material factors that may affect vulnerability to COVID-related harms. RESULTS: The 1020 participants had high rates of poverty, unemployment, food insecurity, homelessness, and sex work. Transgender women with HIV (n = 273) were older, more likely to be Black, had lower educational attainment, and were more likely to experience material hardship. Mental and behavioral health symptoms were common and did not differ by HIV status. Barriers to health care included being mistreated, provider discomfort serving transgender women, and past negative experiences; as well as material hardships, such as cost and transportation. However, most reported access to material and social support-demonstrating resilience. CONCLUSIONS: Transgender women with HIV may be particularly vulnerable to pandemic harms. Mitigating this harm would benefit everyone, given the highly infectious nature of this coronavirus. Collecting gender identity in COVID-19 data is crucial to inform an effective public health response. Transgender-led organizations' response to this crisis serve as an important model for effective community-led interventions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , HIV Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Transgender Persons/psychology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Boston , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mid-Atlantic Region , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Psychosocial Deprivation , Social Support , Socioeconomic Factors , Southeastern United States
2.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 57, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305870

ABSTRACT

Globally, 10-20% of children and adolescents experience mental health conditions, but most of them do not receive the appropriate care when it is needed. The COVID-19 deaths and prevention measures, such as the lockdowns, economic downturns, and school closures, have affected many communities physically, mentally, and economically and significantly impacted the already-neglected children and adolescents' mental health. As a result, evidence has shown that many children and adolescents are experiencing psychological effects such as depression and anxiety without adequate support. The consequences of not addressing the mental health conditions in children and adolescents extend through adulthood and restrict them from reaching their full potential. The effects of COVID-19 on children and adolescents' mental health highlight the urgent need for multisectoral home-grown solutions to provide early diagnosis and treatment and educate caregivers on home-based interventions and community outreach initiatives to address children and adolescents' mental health challenges during this pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Mental Health Services , Early Medical Intervention/organization & administration , Mental Disorders , Quarantine/psychology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Community Mental Health Services/methods , Community Mental Health Services/trends , Education, Distance , Global Health , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health/trends , Psychosocial Deprivation , Rwanda/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Immunol Res ; 2020: 8375096, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949232

ABSTRACT

Recently, the novel coronavirus epidemic occurred in China and spread worldwide to become a global pandemic. COVID-19 is a fatal viral infection causing death, particularly in aged individuals, due to impaired immunity. To date, no intervention is available to prevent COVID-19 and its manifestations. Physical exercise training generally has health benefits, and it assists in the prevention of several chronic diseases. Therefore, this review is aimed at exploring the role of physical exercise training in the face of COVID-19 in older adults and elderly individuals. From this point of view, this review suggests that physical exercise training plays a key role in promoting immune system regulation, delaying immunity dysfunction, reducing circulatory inflammation markers, and preventing sarcopenia and thus could prevent the risk of acquiring COVID-19 infection and reduce the complications of recommended self-isolation in older adults and elderly individuals. Additionally, immunity biomarkers were optimistically demonstrated in older adults following physical exercise training, thereby reducing mortality and morbidity rates. Finally, in accordance with recommendations to stay home and perform self-isolation to prevent the spread of COVID-19, all populations are strongly recommended to practice regular home exercise training at home to promote immune system functioning.


Subject(s)
Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Psychosocial Functioning , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , Frail Elderly/psychology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Patient Isolation , Psychosocial Deprivation , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/prevention & control
4.
Br J Gen Pract ; 70(700): e817-e824, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808097

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the psychological health and health service utilisation of older adults with multimorbidity, who are particularly vulnerable. AIM: To describe changes in loneliness, mental health problems, and attendance to scheduled medical care before and after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN AND SETTING: Telephone survey on a pre-existing cohort of older adults with multimorbidity in primary care. METHOD: Mental health and health service utilisation outcomes were compared with the outcomes before the onset of the COVID-19 outbreak in Hong Kong using paired t-tests, Wilcoxon's signed-rank test, and McNemar's test. Loneliness was measured by the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale. The secondary outcomes (anxiety, depression, and insomnia) were measured by the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder tool, and the Insomnia Severity Index. Appointments attendance data were extracted from a computerised medical record system. Sociodemographic factors associated with outcome changes were examined by linear regression and generalised estimating equations. RESULTS: Data were collected from 583 older (≥60 years) adults. There were significant increases in loneliness, anxiety, and insomnia, after the onset of the COVID-19 outbreak. Missed medical appointments over a 3-month period increased from 16.5% 1 year ago to 22.0% after the onset of the outbreak. In adjusted analysis, being female, living alone, and having >4 chronic conditions were independently associated with increased loneliness. Females were more likely to have increased anxiety and insomnia. CONCLUSION: Psychosocial health of older patients with multimorbidity markedly deteriorated and missed medical appointments substantially increased after the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Loneliness/psychology , Mental Health/trends , Noncommunicable Diseases , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Pneumonia, Viral , Primary Health Care , Social Isolation/psychology , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Female , Help-Seeking Behavior , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Multimorbidity , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Primary Health Care/trends , Psychosocial Deprivation , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
5.
Australas Psychiatry ; 28(6): 624-626, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-788485

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the implementation of quarantine for returning travellers and the effect this has on people's mental health has become a topical issue. This article briefly describes the historical context of quarantine, research around its impact on people's well-being, and the experiences of a clinical psychologist providing support to people in quarantine. CONCLUSIONS: Mental health professionals are in a unique position to assist people in quarantine, both in terms of counselling and ongoing research.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Psychosocial Deprivation , Public Health , Quarantine , Social Isolation/psychology , Behavioral Research , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Professional Role , Psychology/methods , Psychosocial Support Systems , Public Health/methods , Public Health/trends , Quarantine/psychology , Quarantine/trends , SARS-CoV-2
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