Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 45
Filter
1.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e050350, 2022 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702825

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental health condition associated with high mortality rates and significantly impaired quality of life. National guidelines outline psychotherapeutic interventions as treatments of choice for adults with AN, but outcomes are limited and therapy drop-out high, resulting in calls for new innovative treatments. The Specialist Psychotherapy with Emotion for Anorexia in Kent and Sussex (SPEAKS) research programme sought to develop the SPEAKS intervention avoiding some difficulties inherent in development of earlier interventions, such unclear hypotheses about change processes. SPEAKS focuses on a core hypothesised maintaining factor (emotional experience) with clear proposed model of change. The current feasibility trial aims to provide an initial test of SPEAKS and inform design of a full randomised controlled trial protocol. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study employs a multisite, single-arm, within-group, mixed-methods design. Up to 60 participants (36 therapy completers) meeting inclusion criteria will be offered the SPEAKS intervention instead of treatment-as-usual (TAU). SPEAKS is a weekly psychotherapy lasting nine to 12 months, provided by trained and experienced eating disorders therapists. All other clinical input remains inline with TAU. Acceptability will be assessed using VAS scales and end of therapy interview. Reach and recruitment, such as recruitment yield, will be monitored. To support sample size estimation and economic estimation, data pertaining to eating disorder-related symptoms will be recorded every 3 months, alongside service usage and intervention-specific measures. Videoed therapy sessions will inform model adherence. Additional analyses coding videoed therapy will test SPEAKS change process hypotheses. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval has been granted by London-Bromley Research Ethics Committee (NHS Rec Reference: 19/LO/1530). Data will be disseminated via high-impact, peer-reviewed journals (Open Access preferred), conferences, service user and charity networks (eg, UK charity BEAT) and through a free open conference hosted by National Health Service Trusts and Higher Education Institutions. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN11778891. TRIAL STATUS: Recruitment began on 12 December 2019 and ends on 28 February 2021. All data will be collected and the trial ended by 28 February 2022. PROTOCOL VERSION: SPEAKS protocol V.3.0 (30 August 2020). Changes were made to the original protocol due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A further set of changes were made to incorporate the measures of change processes, resulting in this being the third version of the protocol.


Subject(s)
Anorexia Nervosa , COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Adult , Anorexia , Anorexia Nervosa/complications , Anorexia Nervosa/psychology , Anorexia Nervosa/therapy , Emotions , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Outpatients , Pandemics , Psychotherapy/methods , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(22): 7127-7134, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1552079

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The anxiety of life that comes with the pandemic process increases the health anxiety and the level of perceived stress. However, there are uncertainties about which individuals are more sensitive. This study aims to investigate the effects of alexithymic characteristics on health anxiety and perceived stress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors invited the participants to study via social media and e-mail. The data of 793 individuals, aged 18-65, collected over the internet (Google Forms) between November and December 2020 were statistically evaluated. Evaluations were made with the sociodemographic data form, the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), the Health Anxiety Scale (HAS), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). RESULTS: In mediation analyzes between TAS subscales and HAS, Difficulty in Identifying Feelings (DIF) most strongly predicted HAS (B=0.469, p<0.001) and indirectly affected HAS only through GHQ (CS: 0.08, B=0.108, SE:0.021, CI: 0.070, 0.153). However, both PSS (CS: 0.0128, B=0.084, SE:0.027, CI: 0.032, 0.139) and GHQ (CS: 0.02, B=0.139, SE:0.028, CI: 0.090, 0.198) played a mediating role between Difficulty Describing Feelings (DDF) and HAS. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that individuals with alexithymic features are more sensitive to stress during periods of health-related increased stress, such as pandemics, and that individuals with alexithymic features should be given priority in psychotherapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Affective Symptoms/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Adult , Affective Symptoms/diagnosis , Affective Symptoms/therapy , Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internet/instrumentation , Male , Middle Aged , Psychotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
4.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259167, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504045

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mindfulness-Based Interventions (MBIs) are widely used in clinical and non-clinical populations, but little attention has been given to potential adverse effects (AEs). AIMS: This study aimed to gain insight in the prevalence and course of AEs during Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for patients with bipolar disorder (BD). METHOD: The current mixed-methods study was conducted as part of a RCT on (cost-) effectiveness of MBCT in 144 patients with BD (Trial registered on 25th of April 2018, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03507647). During MBCT, occurrence of AEs was monitored prospectively, systematically, and actively (n = 72). Patients who reported AEs were invited for semi-structured interviews after completing MBCT (n = 29). Interviews were analysed with directed content analysis, using an existing framework by Lindahl et al. RESULTS: AEs were reported by 29 patients, in seven of whom the experiences could not be attributed to MBCT during the interview. AEs were reported most frequently up to week 3 and declined afterwards. Baseline anxiety appeared to be a risk factor for developing AEs. Seven existing domains of AEs were observed: cognitive, perceptual, affective, somatic, conative, sense of self, and social. Influencing factors were subdivided into predisposing, precipitating, perpetuating, and mitigating factors. With hindsight, more than half of patients considered the reported AEs as therapeutic rather than harmful. CONCLUSIONS: Although the occurrence of AEs in MBCT for patients with BD is not rare, even in this population with severe mental illness they were not serious or had lasting bad effects. In fact, most of them were seen by the patients as being part of a therapeutic process, although some patients only experienced AEs as negative.


Subject(s)
Bipolar Disorder/therapy , Mindfulness/methods , Psychotherapy/methods , Adult , Aged , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome
6.
Riv Psichiatr ; 56(4): 198-204, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325470

ABSTRACT

The covid-19 lockdown forced psychotherapists to use videoconferencing psychotherapy (VCP). There is little literature on the relationship between VCP and the theoretical orientation of the psychotherapist. The aim of our research work is to explore to what extent the Italian therapists used VCP and how they experienced the change in setting during lockdown. A sample of psychotherapists completed an on-line questionnaire including data about any previous experience of remote work, information on changes in setting during lockdown and their opinions on this experience. In the second phase, a statistical analysis of the data collected was performed with SPSS. The most represented theoretical orientations are psychoanalytic, Gestalt, systemic-relational and psychodynamic. Almost all the respondents had chosen to change the setting, opting for remote work via video calls, with no differences in terms of theoretical orientation and age group. Psychotherapeutic orientation seems to affect the type of difficulties encountered. The scientific literature on remote psychotherapy (VCP) so far does not correlate it with any specific theoretical-clinical model. Our research work offers some preliminary hypotheses about potential correlations between setting variations with the theoretical-clinical models.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Psychotherapists/psychology , Psychotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Aged , Appointments and Schedules , Continuity of Patient Care , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Theoretical , Personal Satisfaction , Quarantine , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telephone , Videoconferencing , Workload
7.
J Psychiatr Pract ; 27(2): 121-125, 2021 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292026

ABSTRACT

There have been shifts over time in the value placed on long-term psychotherapeutic modalities even though they can be life-saving. For example, the province of Ontario in Canada has been dealing with a government proposal put forward in 2019 to limit the length of psychotherapy treatment. In response, stakeholders from numerous groups came together to advocate for the importance of continuing unrestricted access to long-term psychotherapy. Approaches to this advocacy then had to unexpectedly adapt to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that came to the forefront in 2020 and will continue to develop in response to this changing landscape.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Advocacy , Health Policy/legislation & jurisprudence , Mental Health/legislation & jurisprudence , Psychotherapy/legislation & jurisprudence , Psychotherapy/methods , Humans , Ontario , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(4): e216614, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227700

ABSTRACT

Importance: Self-harm and suicidal behavior are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality among children and adolescents. The comparative performance of psychotherapies for suicidality is unclear because few head-to-head clinical trials have been conducted. Objective: To compare the efficacy of psychotherapies for the treatment of self-harm and suicidality among children and adolescents. Data Sources: Four major bibliographic databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Embase) were searched for clinical trials comparing psychotherapy with control conditions from inception to September 2020. Study Selection: Randomized clinical trials comparing psychotherapies for suicidality and/or self-harm with control conditions among children and adolescents were included after a blinded review by 3 independent reviewers (A.B., M.P., and J.W.). Data Extraction and Synthesis: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) reporting guideline was followed for data abstraction, and the Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to evaluate study-level risk of bias. Data abstraction was performed by 1 reviewer (A.B.) and confirmed by 2 independent blinded reviewers (J.W. and M.P.). Data were analyzed from October 15, 2020, to February 15, 2021. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcomes were dichotomized self-harm and retention in treatment. The secondary outcomes were dichotomized all-cause treatment discontinuation and scores on instruments measuring suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms. Effect sizes were pooled using frequentist random-effects network meta-analysis models to generate summary odds ratios (ORs) and Cohen d standardized mean differences (SMDs). Negative Cohen d SMDs or ORs less than 1 indicated that the treatment reduced the parameter of interest relative to the control condition (eg, signifying a beneficial association with suicidal ideation). Results: The systematic search generated 1272 unique records. Of those, 44 randomized clinical trials (5406 total participants; 4109 female participants [76.0%]) from 49 articles were selected (5 follow-up studies were merged with their primary clinical trials to avoid publication bias). The selected clinical trials spanned January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2020. The median duration of treatment was 3 months (range, 0.25-12.00 months), and the median follow-up period was 12 months (range, 1-36 months). None of the investigated psychotherapies were associated with increases in study withdrawals or improvements in retention in treatment compared with treatment as usual. Dialectical behavioral therapies were associated with reductions in self-harm (OR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.12-0.64) and suicidal ideation (Cohen d SMD, -0.71; 95% CI, -1.19 to -0.23) at the end of treatment, while mentalization-based therapies were associated with decreases in self-harm (OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.15-0.97) and suicidal ideation (Cohen d SMD, -1.22; 95% CI, -2.18 to -0.26) at the end of follow-up. The quality of evidence was downgraded because of high risk of bias overall, heterogeneity, publication bias, inconsistency, and imprecision. Conclusions and Relevance: Although some psychotherapeutic modalities appear to be acceptable and efficacious for reducing self-harm and suicidality among children and adolescents, methodological issues and high risk of bias prevent a consistent estimate of their comparative performance.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Health , Child Health , Psychotherapy/methods , Self-Injurious Behavior/therapy , Adolescent , Behavior Therapy , Child , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Depression/therapy , Family Therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Suicidal Ideation
10.
Fam Process ; 61(1): 146-154, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221564

ABSTRACT

The measures adopted by governments around the world to control the spread of the COVID-19 virus (e.g., social distancing) have propelled a rapid transition from face-to-face to online therapy. Studies on online individual therapy indicate that therapists often have favorable attitudes toward this modality. To date, there is scant work on couples therapists' attitudes, despite the fact that the provision of online couples' therapy poses unique challenges (e.g., dealing with escalating conflict remotely). To provide a snapshot, in real time, as to how therapists experience the transition to online therapy, we surveyed 166 Israeli couples' therapists during April 2020, when lockdown orders prevented therapists from seeing couples face-to-face. A few weeks later, when the stay-at-home policy was lifted, a subsample (N = 60) of these therapists completed a follow-up assessment. The results suggest that couples therapists had limited experience using the online modality prior to COVID. The therapists reported experiencing online couples' therapy as somewhat successful and that their experience of providing therapy during the COVID-19 crisis had an overall positive impact on their attitudes toward online work. Establishing a strong therapeutic bond with both partners, dealing with escalating conflict, and treatment dropout were identified as the issues of most concern when conducting online couples therapy. The perceived difficulties with online therapy prospectively predicted lower usage of online couples' therapy, as well as less intention to continue online treatment once the crisis is over.


Las medidas adoptadas por los gobiernos de todo el mundo para controlar la propagación del virus de la COVID-19 (p. ej.: el distanciamiento social) han impulsado una transición rápida de la terapia presencial a la terapia virtual. Los estudios sobre la terapia individual virtual indican que los terapeutas con frecuencia tienen actitudes favorables hacia esta modalidad. Hasta la fecha, los trabajos sobre las actitudes de los terapeutas de pareja son escasos, a pesar del hecho de que la práctica de la terapia de pareja virtual plantea desafíos únicos (p. ej.: manejar la intensificación del conflicto distancia). Para ofrecer un panorama en tiempo real sobre cómo viven los terapeutas la transición a la terapia virtual, encuestamos a 166 terapeutas de pareja israelíes durante abril de 2020, cuando las órdenes de confinamiento impidieron a los terapeutas ver a las parejas en persona. Algunas semanas después, cuando se levantó la orden de quedarse en casa, una submuestra (N=60) de estos terapeutas completó una evaluación de seguimiento. Los resultados sugieren que los terapeutas de pareja tenían poca experiencia en el uso de la modalidad virtual antes de la COVID-19. Los terapeutas informaron que vivieron la terapia de pareja virtual como bastante favorable y que su experiencia de ofrecer terapia durante la crisis de la COVID-19 tuvo un efecto general positivo en sus actitudes hacia el trabajo virtual. Los problemas identificados como los de mayor preocupación a la hora de ofrecer terapia de pareja virtual fueron los siguientes: la construcción de un vínculo terapéutico sólido con ambos integrantes de la pareja, el manejo de la intensificación del conflicto y el abandono del tratamiento. Las dificultades percibidas con la terapia virtual predijeron prospectivamente un menor uso de la terapia de pareja virtual, así como menos intenciones de continuar el tratamiento virtual una vez que termine la crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Couples Therapy , Attitude of Health Personnel , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Psychotherapy/methods
11.
Bull Menninger Clin ; 85(3): 283-297, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211728

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has impacted life for people throughout the world, especially for those in health care who experience unique stressors. To support the psychological needs of staff, faculty, and learners at a biomedical sciences university, faculty at Baylor College of Medicine created a mental health and wellness support program consisting of multiple behavioral health care pathways, including phone support, a self-guided mental health app, a coping skills group, and individual therapy services. The authors present this program as a model for academic institutions to support the well-being of faculty, staff, and learners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Faculty/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Psychotherapy/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Academic Medical Centers , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Health , Mobile Applications , Psychotherapy, Group , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological
12.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 78(7): 767-777, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159461

ABSTRACT

Importance: Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the US, yet many individuals with OUD do not receive treatment. Objective: To assess the cost-effectiveness of OUD treatments and association of these treatments with outcomes in the US. Design and Setting: This model-based cost-effectiveness analysis included a US population with OUD. Interventions: Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) with buprenorphine, methadone, or injectable extended-release naltrexone; psychotherapy (beyond standard counseling); overdose education and naloxone distribution (OEND); and contingency management (CM). Main Outcomes and Measures: Fatal and nonfatal overdoses and deaths throughout 5 years, discounted lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and costs. Results: In the base case, in the absence of treatment, 42 717 overdoses (4132 fatal, 38 585 nonfatal) and 12 660 deaths were estimated to occur in a cohort of 100 000 patients over 5 years, and 11.58 discounted lifetime QALYs were estimated to be experienced per person. An estimated reduction in overdoses was associated with MAT with methadone (10.7%), MAT with buprenorphine or naltrexone (22.0%), and when combined with CM and psychotherapy (range, 21.0%-31.4%). Estimated deceased deaths were associated with MAT with methadone (6%), MAT with buprenorphine or naltrexone (13.9%), and when combined with CM, OEND, and psychotherapy (16.9%). MAT yielded discounted gains of 1.02 to 1.07 QALYs per person. Including only health care sector costs, methadone cost $16 000/QALY gained compared with no treatment, followed by methadone with OEND ($22 000/QALY gained), then by buprenorphine with OEND and CM ($42 000/QALY gained), and then by buprenorphine with OEND, CM, and psychotherapy ($250 000/QALY gained). MAT with naltrexone was dominated by other treatment alternatives. When criminal justice costs were included, all forms of MAT (with buprenorphine, methadone, and naltrexone) were associated with cost savings compared with no treatment, yielding savings of $25 000 to $105 000 in lifetime costs per person. The largest cost savings were associated with methadone plus CM. Results were qualitatively unchanged over a wide range of sensitivity analyses. An analysis using demographic and cost data for Veterans Health Administration patients yielded similar findings. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cost-effectiveness analysis, expanded access to MAT, combined with OEND and CM, was associated with cost-saving reductions in morbidity and mortality from OUD. Lack of widespread MAT availability limits access to a cost-saving medical intervention that reduces morbidity and mortality from OUD. Opioid overdoses in the US likely reached a record high in 2020 because of COVID-19 increasing substance use, exacerbating stress and social isolation, and interfering with opioid treatment. It is essential to understand the cost-effectiveness of alternative forms of MAT to treat OUD.


Subject(s)
Opiate Substitution Treatment/economics , Opioid-Related Disorders/economics , Adult , Buprenorphine/economics , Buprenorphine/therapeutic use , Combined Modality Therapy , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Delayed-Action Preparations , Female , Humans , Male , Methadone/economics , Methadone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Naloxone/administration & dosage , Naloxone/economics , Naloxone/therapeutic use , Opiate Overdose/drug therapy , Opiate Overdose/economics , Opiate Overdose/prevention & control , Opioid-Related Disorders/mortality , Opioid-Related Disorders/therapy , Psychotherapy/economics , Psychotherapy/methods , Treatment Outcome
13.
Int J Psychoanal ; 102(1): 139-158, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142541

ABSTRACT

This article follows almost chronologically the COVID crisis between March and May 2020 during what is called, at least in Europe, the "first wave". Each 'Act' of our internal and external theatre is therefore a moment with a specific date, with the questions that were then pertinent. These 'Acts' were: First was the setting up of remote sessions under health pressures and the recommendations of our psychoanalytic institutions. This change in the frame and its consequences will be presented from various technical points of view, which have ostensibly raised some original metapsychological hypotheses.Then, concerning our profession, its very status as either essential or inessential has been discussed by public authorities, and inevitably by our patients, who will après-coup have to give meaning to our reactions during this crisis.We will next study the effects of remote sessions, particularly from its psychoanalytic 'economic' perspective, and as a kind of 'credit for in-presence' in the early stages of quarantine.We will then be looking at the hypothesis of a maternal element in the sessions, imperceptible in normal times, but suddenly palpable in the context of the absence of physical bodies.Finally, we will propose developments through workshops as an option in order to find a response to this unexpected event at the global scale.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Psychotherapy/economics , Psychotherapy/methods , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/economics , Europe , Humans , Psychotherapy/legislation & jurisprudence , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/legislation & jurisprudence
14.
Trials ; 22(1): 186, 2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depression and anxiety impact up to 1 in 5 pregnant and postpartum women worldwide. Yet, as few as 20% of these women are treated with frontline interventions such as evidence-based psychological treatments. Major barriers to uptake are the limited number of specialized mental health treatment providers in most settings, and problems with accessing in-person care, such as childcare or transportation. Task sharing of treatment to non-specialist providers with delivery on telemedicine platforms could address such barriers. However, the equivalence of these strategies to specialist and in-person models remains unproven. METHODS: This study protocol outlines the Scaling Up Maternal Mental healthcare by Increasing access to Treatment (SUMMIT) randomized trial. SUMMIT is a pragmatic, non-inferiority test of the comparable effectiveness of two types of providers (specialist vs. non-specialist) and delivery modes (telemedicine vs. in-person) of a brief, behavioral activation (BA) treatment for perinatal depressive and anxiety symptoms. Specialists (psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers with ≥ 5 years of therapy experience) and non-specialists (nurses and midwives with no formal training in mental health care) were trained in the BA protocol, with the latter supervised by a BA expert during treatment delivery. Consenting pregnant and postpartum women with Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of ≥ 10 (N = 1368) will be randomized to one of four arms (telemedicine specialist, telemedicine non-specialist, in-person specialist, in-person non-specialist), stratified by pregnancy status (antenatal/postnatal) and study site. The primary outcome is participant-reported depressive symptoms (EPDS) at 3 months post-randomization. Secondary outcomes are maternal symptoms of anxiety and trauma symptoms, perceived social support, activation levels and quality of life at 3-, 6-, and 12-month post-randomization, and depressive symptoms at 6- and 12-month post-randomization. Primary analyses are per-protocol and intent-to-treat. The study has successfully continued despite the COVID-19 pandemic, with needed adaptations, including temporary suspension of the in-person arms and ongoing randomization to telemedicine arms. DISCUSSION: The SUMMIT trial is expected to generate evidence on the non-inferiority of BA delivered by a non-specialist provider compared to specialist and telemedicine compared to in-person. If confirmed, results could pave the way to a dramatic increase in access to treatment for perinatal depression and anxiety. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04153864 . Registered on November 6, 2019.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , Depression, Postpartum/therapy , Depression/therapy , Health Services Accessibility , Pregnancy Complications/therapy , Psychotherapy/methods , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Equivalence Trials as Topic , Female , Humans , Maternal Health Services , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Midwifery , Nurses , Pragmatic Clinical Trials as Topic , Pregnancy , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Psychiatry , Psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Workers , Specialization
15.
Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am ; 32(2): 405-418, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078131

ABSTRACT

With the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States in March 2020, most ambulatory care environments rapidly pivoted to extensive use to telehealth to protect patients and providers while continuing to provide care. This shift resulted in the expansion of telehealth platforms and workflows. Many behavioral health services can be provided in a telehealth format. The case example in this article illustrates that transition to telehealth is feasible and sustainable. Limitations include preoperative psychological assessments and certain neuropsychological tests requiring material manipulation. Careful consideration of risk factors should be exerted for more vulnerable patient populations.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility , Mental Disorders/therapy , Psychotherapy/methods , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Neuropsychological Tests , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Encephale ; 46(3S): S66-S72, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065052

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic affected today more than 3,000,000 worldwide, and more than half of humanity has been placed in quarantine. The scientific community and the political authorities fear an epidemic of suicide secondary to this crisis. The aim of this review is to analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the dimensions of the suicidal process and its interaction with the various risk factors. We also propose innovative strategies to manage suicidal behavior in the context of pandemic. METHODS: We carried out a narrative review of international publications dealing with major pandemics (COVID-19, SARS) and their influence on suicidal vulnerability. RESULTS: Many factors are likely to increase the emergence of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts during this crisis. Social distancing and quarantine could increase the feeling of disconnection and the perception of social pain in vulnerable individuals. Some populations at high suicidal risk could be further impacted by the current pandemic: the elderly, medical staff and individuals exposed to economic insecurity. Several innovative tools adapted to the constraints of social distancing and quarantine may prevent suicide risk: e-health, VigilanS, buddhist-derived practices and art engagement. CONCLUSIONS: This unprecedented crisis may interact with certain dimensions of the suicidal process. However, it is time to innovate. Several suicide prevention tools all have their place in new modes of care and should be tested on a large scale.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Suicide/psychology , Alcoholic Intoxication/psychology , Artificial Intelligence , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Cost of Illness , Crisis Intervention/instrumentation , Economic Recession , France/epidemiology , Humans , Inflammation , Loneliness/psychology , Models, Neurological , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychotherapy/methods , Psychotic Disorders/etiology , Psychotic Disorders/physiopathology , Psychotic Disorders/virology , Quarantine/psychology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide/prevention & control , Suicide/statistics & numerical data , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Telemedicine , Vulnerable Populations
17.
Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM ; 2(4): 100229, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064757

ABSTRACT

Both acute and chronic stress can cause allostatic overload, or long-term imbalance in mediators of homeostasis, that results in disruptions in the maternal-placental-fetal endocrine and immune system responses. During pregnancy, disruptions in homeostasis may increase the likelihood of preterm birth and preeclampsia. Expectant mothers traditionally have high rates of anxiety and depressive disorders, and many are susceptible to a variety of stressors during pregnancy. These common life stressors include financial concerns and relationship challenges and may be exacerbated by the biological, social, and psychological changes occurring during pregnancy. In addition, external stressors such as major weather events (eg, hurricanes, tornados, floods) and other global phenomena (eg, the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic) may contribute to stress during pregnancy. This review investigates recent literature published about the use of nonpharmacologic modalities for stress relief in pregnancy and examines the interplay between psychiatric diagnoses and stressors, with the purpose of evaluating the feasibility of implementing nonpharmacologic interventions as sole therapies or in conjunction with psychotherapy or psychiatric medication therapy. Further, the effectiveness of each nonpharmacologic therapy in reducing symptoms of maternal stress is reviewed. Mindfulness meditation and biofeedback have shown effectiveness in improving one's mental health, such as depressive symptoms and anxiety. Exercise, including yoga, may improve both depressive symptoms and birth outcomes. Expressive writing has successfully been applied postpartum and in response to pregnancy challenges. Although some of these nonpharmacologic interventions can be convenient and low cost, there is a trend toward inconsistent implementation of these modalities. Future investigations should focus on methods to increase ease of uptake, ensure each option is available at home, and provide a standardized way to evaluate whether combinations of different interventions may provide added benefit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies/methods , Pregnancy Complications , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Psychotherapy/methods , Stress, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Mental Health , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Pregnancy Complications/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/therapy
18.
Clin Psychol Psychother ; 28(4): 988-1000, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030671

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: First, to investigate how psychotherapists and patients experience the change from in-person to remote psychotherapy or vice versa during COVID-19 regarding the therapeutic interventions used. Second, to explore the influence of therapeutic orientations on therapeutic interventions in in-person versus remote psychotherapy. METHOD: Psychotherapists (N = 217) from Austria were recruited, who in turn recruited their patients (N = 133). The therapeutic orientation of the therapists was psychodynamic (22.6%), humanistic (46.1%), systemic (20.7%) or behavioural (10.6%). All the data were collected remotely via online surveys. Therapists and patients completed two versions of the 'Multitheoretical List of Therapeutic Interventions' (MULTI-30) (version 1: in-person; version 2: remote) to investigate differences between in-person and remote psychotherapy in the following therapeutic interventions: psychodynamic, common factors, person-centred, process-experiential, interpersonal, cognitive, behavioural and dialectical-behavioural. RESULTS: Therapists rated all examined therapeutic interventions as more typical for in-person than for remote psychotherapy. For patients, three therapeutic interventions (psychodynamic, process-experiential, cognitive interventions) were more typical for in-person than for remote psychotherapy after correcting for multiple testing. For two therapeutic interventions (behavioural, dialectical-behavioural), differences between the four therapeutic orientations were more consistent for in-person than for remote psychotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Therapeutic interventions differed between in-person and remote psychotherapy and differences between therapeutic orientations in behavioural-oriented interventions become indistinct in remote psychotherapy.


Subject(s)
Office Visits , Psychotherapy , Remote Consultation , Adult , Austria/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patients/psychology , Patients/statistics & numerical data , Psychotherapists/psychology , Psychotherapists/statistics & numerical data , Psychotherapy/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
J Cogn Psychother ; 34(4): 275-279, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999901

ABSTRACT

This invited commentary is the personal experience of a psychiatrist who assisted in Wuhan, China during the pandemic. From the personal perspective, it explains why psychiatrists need to go to Wuhan, discusses the psychological problems faced by the front-line medical staff and confirmed COVID-19 patients and the corresponding psychological interventions provided to them, describes the particularity and coping methods of psychological issues related to COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Physician's Role/psychology , Psychiatry/methods , Psychotherapy/methods , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , China , Humans
20.
Aust Health Rev ; 44(6): 916-923, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998061

ABSTRACT

Objective Mental health nurses (MHNs) have a long, under-recognised, history of engaging in psychotherapeutic practice across the spectrum of mental illness and mental health problems. There is a need for a psychotherapeutic response for people with complex or serious mental health problems within the stepped care model and in response to increased need for psychotherapeutic responses to COVID-19 and natural disasters. This project sought to identify the educational preparation and self-reported competency of MHNs to clinically undertake psychotherapy across the continuum of care. Methods Situated within a larger mixed-methods study exploring how MHNs practice psychotherapy, adapt it to routine care and envisage the future, this paper reports the findings from a survey of MHNs regarding their educational preparation, experience and competence in modalities of psychotherapy and the application of psychotherapy with specific clinical groups. Results In all, 153 MHNs responded to a request to participate in the study. In this cohort, 86% of nurses had postgraduate qualifications specific to psychotherapy and 95% had worked for over 10 years in the mental health field and had hundreds of hours of training in psychotherapy. There was a high level of self-reported competence in working with people with serious mental health problems and at-risk or vulnerable groups. Conclusions Currently, MHNs are not recognised in federal funding arrangements to procure psychotherapeutic intervention for members of the Australian population who require it. MHNs ought to be recognised as independent providers based on both the psychotherapeutic skills they possess and their specialist clinical skills of working with people across the spectrum of mental health problems. Appropriately qualified MHNs need to be funded to use their skills in psychotherapy via access to appropriate funding arrangements, such as Better Access and the National Disability Insurance Scheme. What is known about the topic? MHNs do not appear to be recognised as having postgraduate knowledge and skills in psychotherapy and other psychotherapeutic interventions. This lack of recognition has resulted in the Australian public being unable to access subsidised specialist psychotherapeutic services by this highly experienced group. Most published commentary has been around the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program, but, to date, scholarly work related to this program has not influenced public views and policy formation despite multiple favourable evaluations. What does this paper add? This study highlights that MHNs possess a largely unrecognised and valuable skill set in psychotherapy practice that they can adapt to work with people with complex needs. What are the implications to practitioners? MHNs possess skills and experience that, if recognised and funded, could be rapidly mobilised to improve consumer outcomes across the continuum of stepped care and in response to increased need during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Competence/standards , Mental Disorders/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Psychiatric Nursing/standards , Adult , Australia , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Pandemics , Psychiatric Nursing/education , Psychotherapy/education , Psychotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL