Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 211
Filter
1.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(1): 18-26, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100783

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic mental illness are frequently hospitalized and discharged from psychiatry wards. This situation is referred to as the "revolving door phenomenon" (RDP). In addition to factors related to the patient and the disease, limited number of beds leading to shortened hospital stay are among the reasons associated with frequent hospitalization. This study aims to compare patients with RDP and patients with single hospitalization in terms of clinical, sociodemographic, and treatment-oriented characteristics in order to evaluate the risk factors causing frequent hospitalization. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In this study, patients who were admitted and hospitalized between May 1, 2011 - May 1, 2016 were retrospectively evaluated from patient records. The RDP group consisted of 74 patients and the single-hospitalization group consisted of 59 patients who met inclusion criteria. RESULTS: The RDP group had significantly higher rates of male gender, ECT history, past suicide attempts, multiple drug treatment, clozapine use, legal incidents, and noncompliance to follow up following discharge compared to the single-hospitalization group (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that Turkey also has RDP patients with characteristics and hospitalization patterns similar to patients in countries with different cultural, social, and economic conditions. It is important to identify and correct factors that cause frequent hospitalization as it will reduce the burden of the health system as well as provide benefit to the patient.


Subject(s)
Bipolar Disorder , Psychotic Disorders , Schizophrenia , Bipolar Disorder/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Mood Disorders , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Schizophrenia/epidemiology , Turkey/epidemiology
2.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(3): 214-219, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096525

ABSTRACT

In the last three decades, early intervention for psychosis (EIP) services have been established worldwide and have resulted in superior symptomatic and functional outcomes for people affected by psychotic disorders. These improved outcomes are a result of reducing delays to treatment and the provision of specialised, holistic interventions. The COVID-19 pandemic poses significant challenges to the delivery of these services, such as undetected cases or long delays to treatment. Furthermore, the COVID-19 pandemic will likely increase the mental health needs of communities, including the incidence of psychotic disorders. In this perspective piece, we provide suggestions as to how EIP services can adapt within this environment, such as utilising novel technologies. Finally, we argue that despite the economic consequences of the pandemic, the funding for mental health services, including EI services, should be increased in line with the need for these services during and beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Psychotic Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Psychotic Disorders/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Croat Med J ; 63(5): 412-422, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2092246

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess whether fear of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with depression, anxiety, and psychosis and to evaluate if these variables are correlated with the interaction between spirituality and fear of COVID-19. METHODS: Between September and November 2020, this cross-sectional study enrolled 118 chronic schizophrenia patients. The interview with patients included Fear of COVID-19 Scale, Lebanese Anxiety Scale-10, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being-12. The results were analyzed by using linear regressions (Enter method), with anxiety, depression, total PANSS score, positive PANSS, negative PANSS, and general psychopathology PANSS subscales as dependent variables. Spirituality, fear of COVID-19, and the interaction of spirituality with fear of COVID-19 were independents variables. RESULTS: Fear of COVID-19 was positively correlated with increased total PANSS scores (Beta=0.90, P=0.030). Higher spirituality was significantly associated with lower anxiety (Beta=-0.14, P=0.009), lower depression (Beta=-0.21, P=0.001), lower total PANSS score (Beta=-0.90, P=0.004), lower negative PANSS score (Beta=-0.23, P=0.009), and lower general psychopathology PANSS score (Beta=-0.61, P=0.001). In patients with high fear of COVID-19, having low spirituality was significantly associated with higher anxiety, depression, and psychotic symptoms. CONCLUSION: This study suggests a positive correlation between fear of COVID-19 and higher psychosis among inpatients with schizophrenia. The interaction of spirituality with fear of COVID-19 was correlated with reduced anxiety, depression, and psychosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychotic Disorders , Schizophrenia , Humans , Spirituality , Depression/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Psychotic Disorders/complications , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Anxiety , Fear
6.
Curr Opin Psychiatry ; 34(3): 203-210, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078019

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic is having a critical impact on healthcare systems across the world, as well as on mental health in the general population; however, evidence regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on people living with schizophrenia and on the onset of psychotic symptoms is currently emerging. RECENT FINDINGS: People living with schizophrenia are at an increased risk of COVID-19 and present worse COVID-19-related outcomes, including mortality. They show low levels of information and of concern regarding the possibility of contagion and infection but presented substantially stable levels of psychotic symptoms and even increased subjective well being during the pandemic. SARS-CoV-2, as well as the prolonged social isolation and the spread of misinformation, appear to be responsible in some cases for the onset of psychotic symptoms. SUMMARY: Clinicians should inform and educate their patients on the risks related to SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 and on the precautions that they should adopt to avoid contagion. Particular attention should be devoted to maintaining the continuity of care, especially in frail patients. Telemedicine might represent a valid support, but face-to-face visits in some cases remain essential. The hypothesis of a direct role of viral infection on the onset of psychotic disorders is currently debated, as viral involvement of central nervous system appears to be rather infrequent in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , Psychotic Disorders , Schizophrenia , Telemedicine , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Psychotic Disorders/therapy , Schizophrenia/therapy
8.
Eur Psychiatry ; 65(1): e56, 2022 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054015

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: DIALOG+ is a digital psychosocial intervention aimed at making routine meetings between patients and clinicians therapeutically effective. This study aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of implementing DIALOG+ treatment for patients with psychotic disorders in five low- and middle-income countries in Southeast Europe alongside a cluster randomised trial. METHODS: Resource use and quality of life data were collected alongside the multi-country cluster randomised trial of 468 participants with psychotic disorders. Due to COVID-19 interruptions of the trial's original 12-month intervention period, adjusted costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated at the participant level using a mixed-effects model over the first 6 months only. We estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) with uncertainty presented using a cost-effectiveness plane and a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Seven sensitivity analyses were conducted to check the robustness of the findings. RESULTS: The average cost of delivering DIALOG+ was €91.11 per participant. DIALOG+ was associated with an incremental health gain of 0.0032 QALYs (95% CI -0.0015, 0.0079), incremental costs of €84.17 (95% CI -8.18, 176.52), and an estimated ICER of €26,347.61. The probability of DIALOG+ being cost-effective against three times the weighted gross domestic product (GDP) per capita for the five participating countries was 18.9%. CONCLUSION: Evidence from the cost-effectiveness analyses in this study suggested that DIALOG+ involved relatively low costs. However, it is not likely to be cost-effective in the five participating countries compared with standard care against a willingness-to-pay threshold of three times the weighted GDP per capita per QALY gained.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychotic Disorders , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Developing Countries , Europe , Humans , Psychosocial Intervention , Psychotic Disorders/therapy , Quality of Life
9.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(Suppl 8): 56-59, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2046526

ABSTRACT

Vaccines are crucial to ending the COVID-19 pandemic. An mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine can cause mild to moderate side effects. A number of cases of cardiac, gastrointestinal, and psychiatric side effects have been reported as rare side effects associated with the COVID-19 vaccine. This article presents a patient, who after the second injection of the mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine, immediately developed anxiety, nonspecific fear, and insomnia as the prodromal phase of psychosis. Starting from the second week, the patient manifested delusions of persecution, delusions of influence, thoughts insertion, and delusional behaviour, culminating in the suicide attempt. The duration of psychosis was eight weeks, and symptom reduction was observed only after the gradual administration of antipsychotics over four weeks. The investigations of the patient did not support any structural changes of the brain, any severe medical conditions, a neurological abnormality, a confusion or a state of unconsciousness or alterations in laboratory tests. Psychosis due to the use of alcohol or psychoactive substances was excluded. The psychological assessment of the patient demonstrated the endogenous type of thinking, and the patient had schizoid and paranoid personality traits strongly associated with schizophrenia. This case indicates a strong causal relationship between the mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine injection and the onset of psychosis. We intend to follow up this case for possible development of schizophrenia and understand that the COVID-19 vaccine could possible play a trigger role in the development of primary psychosis. Longer-term supporting evidence is needed to estimate the prevalence of psychosis following vaccination with the mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Psychotic Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Vaccination
10.
Eur Psychiatry ; 65(1): e50, 2022 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032627

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In Southeast Europe (SEE) standard treatment of patients with psychosis is largely based on pharmacotherapy with psychosocial interventions rarely available. DIALOG+ is a digital psychosocial intervention designed to make routine care therapeutically effective. This trial simultaneously examined effectiveness of DIALOG+ versus standard care on clinical and social outcomes (Aim 1) and explored intervention fidelity (Aim 2). METHODS: A hybrid type II effectiveness-implementation, cluster-randomized trial was conducted in five SEE countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo*, Montenegro, North Macedonia, and Serbia. The intervention was offered to patients six times across 12 months instead of routine care. The outcomes were subjective quality of life (primary), clinical symptoms, satisfaction with services, and economic costs. Intervention fidelity was operationalized as adherence to the protocol in terms of frequency, duration, content, and coverage. Data were analyzed using multilevel regression. RESULTS: A total of 81 clinicians and 468 patients with psychosis were randomized to DIALOG+ or standard care. The intervention was delivered with high fidelity. The average number of delivered sessions was 5.5 (SD = 2.3) across 12 months. Patients in the intervention arm had better quality of life (MANSA) at 6 months (p = 0.03). No difference was found for other outcomes at 6 months. Due to disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, 12-month data were not interpretable. CONCLUSIONS: DIALOG+ improved subjective quality of life of individuals with psychosis at 6 months (after four sessions), albeit with small effect size. The intervention has the potential to contribute to holistic care of patients with psychosis.


Subject(s)
Psychosocial Intervention , Psychotic Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Developing Countries , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , Psychotic Disorders/therapy , Quality of Life , Treatment Outcome
11.
Psychiatry Res ; 317: 114845, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031636

ABSTRACT

In our study we aimed to investigate the effect of the pandemic period on disease severity, medication adherence, suicidal behavior, physical health and health behavior in patients with psychotic disorders. 255 patients with any of the diagnoses of Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder, Delusional Disorder, Bipolar Disorder with psychotic features and Major Depressive Disorder with psychotic features were included, 200 were assessed by telephone and 55 face-to-face. The patient's sociodemographic status, cigarette-alcohol use, physical diseases, body weight, suicidal behaviors, and the effects of the pandemic period on general health were assessed. Clinical global impression scale(CGI) and modified medication adherence scale(MMS) were also administered. We showed that the MMS scores of the patients significantly decreased compared to the pre-pandemic period. In our study, suicidal behavior and decrease in medication adherence during the pandemic period were found to be correlated with higher scores of CGI- Severity and Improvement Scale. Our study is one of the few studies that addresses the effects of the pandemic period on patients with psychotic disorders. The results show that the pandemic period is associated with an increase in negative health behavior and clinical worsening in patients with psychotic disorders. In order to confirm these findings, more research is needed in this area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Psychotic Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Health Behavior
12.
Pediatrics ; 150(3)2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022094

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) disease 2019 illness is less common in children than in adults. Here, we report an unvaccinated 16-year-old male, normally fit and well with no previous personal or family history of mental illness, who developed moderate respiratory illness related to SARS-CoV-2 infection that was followed by acute psychosis. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are well documented in adults with SARS-CoV-2 infections; however, there are few reports in the pediatric population. This case illustrates that acute psychosis is a possible complication in children with mild SARS-CoV-2 illness and highlights the need for vigilance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychotic Disorders , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Humans , Male , Psychotic Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 210(9): 724-726, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2018342

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This case series reports three middle-aged male patients with no prior history of psychiatric disorders who developed psychotic symptoms with manic characteristics after COVID-19 infection. They presented mystic and paranoid delusions associated with euphoria, logorrheic, insomnia, and bizarre behaviors. Two of them required psychiatric hospitalization and one received corticosteroids. Treatment with antipsychotic medication improved their symptoms in a few weeks. This case series reports the new-onset psychosis probably due to COVID-19 infection. Pathogenetic speculation about the probable causes of COVID-19 psychosis, such as inflammatory reaction and corticosteroid use, was done. Moreover, other probable causes of manic psychosis, such as late-onset bipolar disorder, were also considered and ruled out. There is a need for more research to determine the causality between psychotic symptoms and COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Antipsychotic Agents , Bipolar Disorder , COVID-19 , Psychotic Disorders , Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , Bipolar Disorder/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Trials ; 23(1): 751, 2022 Sep 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Substantial data from high-income countries support early interventions in the form of evidence-based Coordinated Specialty Care (CSC) for people experiencing First Episode Psychosis (FEP) to ameliorate symptoms and minimize disability. Chile is unique among Latin American countries in providing universal access to FEP services through a national FEP policy that mandates the identification of FEP individuals in primary care and guarantees delivery of community-based FEP treatments within a public health care system. Nonetheless, previous research has documented that FEP services currently provided at mental health clinics do not provide evidence-based approaches. This proposal aims to address this shortfall by first adapting OnTrackNY (OTNY), a CSC program currently being implemented across the USA, into OnTrackChile (OTCH), and then examine its effectiveness and implementation in Chile. METHODS: The Dynamic Adaptation Process will be used first to inform the adaptation and implementation of OTCH to the Chilean context. Then, a Hybrid Type 1 trial design will test its effectiveness and cost and evaluate its implementation using a cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) (N = 300 from 21 outpatient clinics). The OTCH program will be offered in half of these outpatient clinics to individuals ages 15-35. Usual care services will continue to be offered at the other clinics. Given the current COVID-19 pandemic, most research and intervention procedures will be conducted remotely. The study will engage participants over the course of 2 years, with assessments administered at enrollment, 12 months, and 24 months. Primary outcomes include implementation (fidelity, acceptability, and uptake) and service outcomes (person-centeredness, adherence, and retention). Secondary outcomes comprise participant-level outcomes such as symptoms, functioning, and recovery orientation. Over the course of the study, interviews and focus groups with stakeholders will be conducted to better understand the implementation of OTCH. DISCUSSION: Findings from this study will help determine the feasibility, effectiveness, and cost for delivering CSC services in Chile. Lessons learned about facilitators and barriers related to the implementation of the model could help inform the approach needed for these services to be further expanded throughout Latin America. TRIAL REGISTRATION: www. CLINICALTRIALS: gov NCT04247711 . Registered 30 January 2020. TRIAL STATUS: The OTCH trial is currently recruiting participants. Recruitment started on March 1, 2021, and is expected to be completed by December 1, 2022. This is the first version of this protocol (5/12/2021).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychotic Disorders , Adolescent , Adult , Chile , Humans , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Psychotic Disorders/psychology , Psychotic Disorders/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Young Adult
15.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 10: 23247096221110402, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009335

ABSTRACT

Baclofen is used to treat muscle spasticity, acting at GABA B receptors in the central nervous system. The abrupt cessation of baclofen causes baclofen withdrawal-induced psychosis. The risk is exacerbated if the patient has renal insufficiency or if the drug has been taken for a long time at high doses. Gradual tapering of baclofen usually does not produce symptomatic adverse effects. However, abrupt termination of the drug, especially in an inpatient hospital setting, can lead to symptoms such as increased spasticity, agitation, confusion, hallucinations, and seizures. We present a case of a patient who initially presented with seizures and experienced hallucinations after abrupt cessation of the medication. She had baseline chronic kidney disease but presented with acute worsening of her renal function. Impaired renal function decreases baclofen clearance and causes increased concentration of baclofen in circulation. This put the patient at higher risk of developing baclofen withdrawal, even at a lower dose.


Subject(s)
Psychotic Disorders , Renal Insufficiency , Substance Withdrawal Syndrome , Baclofen/adverse effects , Female , Hallucinations/chemically induced , Hallucinations/complications , Hallucinations/drug therapy , Humans , Muscle Spasticity/complications , Muscle Spasticity/drug therapy , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Seizures/chemically induced , Substance Withdrawal Syndrome/etiology
16.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273579, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002339

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had unprecedented effects on mental health and community functioning. Negative effects related to disruption of individuals' social connections may have been more severe for those who had tenuous social connections prior to the pandemic. Veterans who have recently experienced homelessness (RHV) or have a psychotic disorder (PSY) are considered particularly vulnerable because many had poor social connections prior to the pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a 15-month longitudinal study between May 2020 -July 2021 assessing clinical (e.g., depression, anxiety) and community (e.g., social functioning, work functioning) outcomes. Eighty-one PSY, 76 RHV, and 74 Veteran controls (CTL) were interviewed over 5 assessment periods. We assessed changes in mental health and community functioning trajectories relative to pre-pandemic retrospective ratings and examined group differences in these trajectories. RESULTS: All groups had significantly increased symptoms of depression, anxiety, and concerns with contamination at the onset of the pandemic. However, RHV and PSY showed faster returns to their baseline levels compared to CTL, who took nearly 15 months to return to baseline. With regards to functioning, both RHV and PSY, but not CTL, had significant improvements in family and social networks over time. Work functioning worsened over time only in PSY, and independent living increased over time in both RHV and PSY but not CTL. CONCLUSIONS: These results reveal that vulnerable Veterans with access to VA mental health and case management services exhibited lower negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health and community functioning than expected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Homeless Persons , Psychotic Disorders , Veterans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Mental Health , Pandemics , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Veterans/psychology
18.
Ann Clin Psychiatry ; 34(3): 207-208, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1955019
19.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 718, 2022 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951223

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has been impacting the need, utilization, and delivery of mental health services with greater challenges being faced by clients and providers. With many clients facing reduced access to services and social isolation, a focus on suicide risk assessment and prevention is critical. Concern is particularly increased for clients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders given data show suicide rates are disproportionately high for those with psychosis in comparison to the general population. Provider perspectives of challenges in service delivery are needed to inform efforts to improve access, feasibility, and quality of mental health care throughout the evolving pandemic. This study explored mental health provider perspectives of client challenges in service utilization and provider challenges in service delivery, including remote engagement, suicide risk assessment, and treatment of psychosis. METHODS: Data were collected from social work mental health providers (n = 12) in United States community mental health setting. Providers consented to participate and responded to questions about service delivery experiences in late 2020 and in relation to COVID-19. Demographic and practice-related provider data were explored descriptively using SPSS and qualitative data using open coding and grounded theory methods in Dedoose. RESULTS: Among the 9 providers who engaged in remote service delivery, 7 (77.8%) experienced challenges in remote engagement with clients and 8 (88.9%) experienced challenges in treatment of psychosis. Among the 7 providers who engaged in remote suicide assessment, 4(57%) experienced challenges. Qualitative themes emerged including logistic (e.g., technology access and use), engagement (e.g., virtual rapport-building and limited remote services), and clinical (e.g., difficulty assessing suicide risk, internal stimuli, abnormal involuntary movement, and affect) challenges in service delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Provider perspectives are essential to inform efforts to build resources and problem-solve challenges and barriers that both providers and clients face throughout various shifts in mental health service delivery. Findings emphasize the need to troubleshoot client access to technology, bolster support for providers to prevent burnout, and greater provider training to improve skills in remote engagement, assessment, and treatment, particularly in relation to psychosis and suicide prevention. Study implications are not only critical for the evolving COVID-19 pandemic, but also in preparation for ongoing shifts in service delivery as technology evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychotic Disorders , Suicide , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Psychotic Disorders/therapy , Risk Assessment , Suicide/prevention & control
20.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0270307, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933361

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Psychosis is a well established complication of non-prescription drug use. We sought to measure the 1-year mortality of emergency department patients with substance-induced psychosis (SIP). METHODS: This study was a multi-centre, retrospective electronic medical records review of patients presenting to the ED with substance-induced psychosis (SIP). We interrogated the hospital ED database from Jan 1, 2018 and Jan 1, 2019 to identify consecutive patients. All patients were followed for one year from index visit, and classified as alive/dead at that time. Patients were included in the study if they met the following criteria: 1) ED discharge diagnosis of psychosis NOS and a positive urine drugs of abuse screen (UDAS) or the patient verbally endorsed drug use, or 2) Mental disorder due to drug use and "disorganized thought", "bizarre behavior" or "delusional behavior" documented in the chart and one or more of the following criteria: a) arrival with police, b) mental health certification, c) physical restraints, d) chemical restraints. We excluded patients who were not British Columbia residents, since we were unable to ascertain if they were alive or dead at 1 year from their index ED visit. Primary statistical analysis was logistic regression for risk of death in 1 year, based on plausible risk factors, selected a priori. RESULTS: We identified 813 presentations for SIP (620 unique patients). The median age of the entire cohort was 35 years (IQR 28-44), and 69.5% (n = 565) were male. Thirty five patients (4.3%; 95% CI 3.2-5.9) had died one year after their initial presentation to the ED for SIP. Separate multivariable logistic regression analyses, controlling for age, demonstrated schizophrenia (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.8-11.1) significantly associated with increased 1-year mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In our study of patients presenting to the ED with SIP, the 1-year mortality was 4.3%. Controlling for age, schizophrenia was a notable risk factor for increased 1-year mortality.


Subject(s)
Psychotic Disorders , Substance-Related Disorders , Adult , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Male , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , Substance-Related Disorders/diagnosis
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL