Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 127
Filter
1.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 22(2): 119-124, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1791822

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physician trainee research collaboratives (TRCs) help trainees develop research skills and establish peer networks. We aimed to identify the structure, activity and views of physician TRCs in the UK. METHODS: Representatives from physician TRCs in the UK were invited to complete an online survey and participate in a focus group. RESULTS: Representatives from 23 physician TRCs completed the survey. There was wide variation in collaborative structure, senior input and funding resources. Seventy-four per cent of physician TRCs had published peer-reviewed articles, with 70% reporting ongoing projects at the time of the survey. The survey and focus group identified improved patient care, research and leadership skills as benefits of collaborative work; while institutional and consultant support, limited time for research, funding opportunities and restrictions on group authorship were cited as challenges to collaborative success. CONCLUSION: Physician TRC activity continues to grow and demonstrates a dynamic approach to research for all trainees.


Subject(s)
Physicians , Humans , Leadership , Publications , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
2.
Surg Endosc ; 36(5): 3340-3346, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1787817

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The protection of intellectual property (IP) is one of the fundamental elements in the process of medical device development. The significance of IP, however, is not well understood among clinicians and researchers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current status of IP awareness and IP-related behaviors among EAES members. METHODS: A web-based survey was conducted via questionnaires sent to EAES members. Data collected included participant demographics, level of understanding the need, new ideas and solutions, basic IP knowledge, e.g., employees' inventions and public disclosure, behaviors before and after idea disclosures. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-nine completed forms were obtained through an email campaign conducted twice in 2019 (response rate = 4.8%). There was a dominancy in male, formally-trained gastrointestinal surgeons, working at teaching hospitals in European countries. Of the respondents, 71% demonstrated a high level of understanding the needs (frustration with current medical devices), with 66% developing specific solutions by themselves. Active discussion with others was done by 53%. Twenty-one percent of respondents presented their ideas at medical congresses, and 12% published in scientific journals. Only 20% took specific precautions or appropriate actions to protect their IPs before these disclosures. CONCLUSIONS: The current level of awareness of IP and IP-related issues is relatively low among EAES members. A structured IP training program to gain basic IP knowledge and skill should be considered a necessity for clinicians. These skills would serve to prevent the loss of legitimate IP rights and avoid failure in the clinical implementation of innovative devices for the benefit of patients.


Subject(s)
Intellectual Property , Surgeons , Europe , Humans , Male , Publications , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Nurs Open ; 9(3): 1575-1588, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1782651

ABSTRACT

AIM: This review aimed to elucidate research trends in global nursing in international literature. DESIGN: A scoping literature review of the PRISMA was used to guide the review. METHODS: PubMed was used to search for English articles published in academic journals between 2016-2018. The search keywords were "global/international/world nursing." We used thematic synthesis to analyse and interpret the data and generated topics for global nursing literature. RESULTS: In total, 133 articles were analysed. Six topics emerged: (a) conceptualization of global nursing, (b) environmental health, (c) infectious diseases, (d) security efforts, (e) global shortage of nursing personnel and (f) diversification of study abroad programmes. The results of this review reflect today's serious international health, labour and global environmental issues. Based on these latest global nursing topics, it is necessary to develop new strategies, nursing models and environment-related theories to create and maintain a healthy environment.


Subject(s)
Global Health , Publications , Environmental Health
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785660

ABSTRACT

In the last few years, there has been an emphasis on the importance of health literacy (HL) and health education (HE) as basic tools to empower individuals and the community. The increasing interest in HL and HE has been observed through the evolution of publications and the nature of the main trends in the last few years. Knowing how HL and HE have evolved in scientific publications can help us to identify trends and set work priorities in this scope. Based on this, a bibliometric analysis (from 2000 to 2021) was conducted in two phases: first, an analysis was performed on the publications included in the Web of Science (WOS); second, a more specific analysis was conducted on the Core Collection from WOS. The data were analyzed with two software programs, the and Bibliometrix package for RStudio, and VOSviewer to analyze number of publications, citations, authors, collaborations, keywords trends, keywords evolutions and clusters of related terms. A total of 1799 articles were found in the first phase, and 727 in the second. The results from both analyses showed that the publications increased unequally until 2020, and considerably decreased in 2021; however, in spite of this, the number of citations remained constant. Likewise, five word clusters related with HL and HE were identified. D. Nutbeam stood out as the most prolific author on the subject, the USA as the country with the most publications, and the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health as having the most articles on the subject. This analysis may be a useful and helpful tool for future studies on the subject.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Bibliometrics , Health Education , Humans , Publications
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785643

ABSTRACT

Environmental audit is inevitably linked to climate change, one immediate target of the auditors is likely to be climate control, and the warming of the Earth and the consequent climatic changes affect us all. What is the link between environmental audit and climate change? What ties together some of these themes between environmental audit and climate change? The interaction between climate change and environmental audit has been one of the most challenging. In this paper, a scientometric analysis of 84 academic publications between 2013 and 2021 related to climate change and environmental audit is presented to characterize the knowledge domain by using the CiteSpace visualization software. First, we present the number of publications, the number of citations, research categories, and journals published through Web of Science database. Secondly, we analyze countries, authors, and journals with outstanding contributions through network analysis. Finally, we use keyword analysis and apply three types of knowledge mapping to our research, cluster view, timeline view, and time zone view, revealing the focus and future directions. We identify the most important topic in the field of climate change and environment audit as represented on the basis of existing literature data which include the Carbon Emissions, Social Capital, Energy Audit, Corporate Governance, Diffusion of Innovation Environmental Management System, and Audit Committee. The results show that climate change and environmental audit publications grew slowly, but the research are widely cited by scholars. Published journals are relatively scattered, but the cited journals are the world's top journals, and most research countries are developed countries. The most productive authors and institutions in this subject area are in UK, Australia, USA, Spain, and Netherlands. There are no leading figures, but the content of their research can be divided into six clusters. Future research content involving city, policy, dynamics, information, biodiversity, conservation and clustering social capital, diffusion of innovation environmental management, and audit committee are the directions for future research. It is worth noting that cities, policies, and adaptability are closely linked to public health.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , Climate Change , Cities , Knowledge , Publications
6.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264265, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759946

ABSTRACT

The gender gap is a well-known problem in academia and, despite its gradual narrowing, recent estimations indicate that it will persist for decades. Short-term descriptive studies suggest that this gap may have actually worsened during the months of confinement following the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. In this work, we evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on female and male academics' research productivity using preprint drop-off data. We examine a total of 307,902 unique research articles deposited in 5 major preprint repositories during the period between January and May each year from 2017 to 2020. We find that the proportion of female authors in online repositories steadily increased over time; however, the trend reversed during the confinement and gender parity worsened in two respects. First, the proportion of male authors in preprints increased significantly during lockdown. Second, the proportion of male authors in COVID-19-related articles was significantly higher than that of women. Overall, our results imply that the gender gap in academia suffered an approximately 1-year setback during the strict lockdown months of 2020, and COVID-related research areas suffered an additional 1.5-year setback.


Subject(s)
Authorship , COVID-19/epidemiology , Publications/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Research/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Time Factors
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736893

ABSTRACT

Higher Educational Institutions (HEIs) are responsible for creating healthy and sustainable environments for students and teachers through diverse educational paradigms such as gamification. In this sense, the Healthy People 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals indicated the imperative to provide inclusive and equitable quality education to promote a healthy environment and life. The principal objective was to analyse the impact of gamification on health development in HEIs, highlighting their positive and negative effects. To achieve such an objective, a bibliometric analysis was carried out. The 257 documents showed no significant increasing trend in the last decade (p > 0.05) related to the pandemic. Most of the publications were conferences (45%), and the few published articles were the documents with more citations (p < 0.001). According to their index in Journal Citation Reports, there were significant differences between the citations of articles published in journals (p < 0.001). The analysis of journal co-citations showed that the leading journals (such as Computers in Human Behavior) had a significant part in the clusters formed (p < 0.001), conditioning also the keywords, especially the term "motivation". These findings were discussed, concluding that the experimental studies focused on the teachers' adverse effects are yet to come.


Subject(s)
Motivation , Bibliometrics , Humans , Journal Impact Factor , Publications
8.
PLoS Biol ; 20(2): e3001285, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662437

ABSTRACT

Amid the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, preprints in the biomedical sciences are being posted and accessed at unprecedented rates, drawing widespread attention from the general public, press, and policymakers for the first time. This phenomenon has sharpened long-standing questions about the reliability of information shared prior to journal peer review. Does the information shared in preprints typically withstand the scrutiny of peer review, or are conclusions likely to change in the version of record? We assessed preprints from bioRxiv and medRxiv that had been posted and subsequently published in a journal through April 30, 2020, representing the initial phase of the pandemic response. We utilised a combination of automatic and manual annotations to quantify how an article changed between the preprinted and published version. We found that the total number of figure panels and tables changed little between preprint and published articles. Moreover, the conclusions of 7.2% of non-COVID-19-related and 17.2% of COVID-19-related abstracts undergo a discrete change by the time of publication, but the majority of these changes do not qualitatively change the conclusions of the paper.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Information Dissemination/methods , Peer Review, Research/trends , Periodicals as Topic/trends , Publications/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peer Review, Research/methods , Peer Review, Research/standards , Periodicals as Topic/standards , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Publications/standards , Publications/statistics & numerical data , Publishing/standards , Publishing/statistics & numerical data , Publishing/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650568

ABSTRACT

With the outbreak of the 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the issue of increasing health disparities has received a great deal of attention from scholars and organizations. This study analyzes 2282 papers on COVID-19-related health disparities that have been retrieved from the WOS database, with 58,413 references. Using bibliometric analysis and knowledge mapping visualizations, the paper focuses on the academic structure and research trends by examining the research distribution of countries, journals and authors, keywords, highly cited articles, and reference co-citation. The results show that the United States has contributed the most, and the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health has published the largest number of papers on this topic. As for the core authors, Michael Marmot is the most productive. Issues such as racial health, mental health, and digital health disparities have been the trending topics of the COVID-19-related health disparities. The research directions include the features, factors, and interventions of health disparities under the influence of COVID-19. As such, this study provides literature support and suggestions to investigate COVID-19-related health disparities. The findings of the paper also remind public health regulators to consider factors of health disparities when developing long-term public health regulatory policies related to the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Bibliometrics , Humans , Publications , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
11.
Syst Rev ; 11(1): 7, 2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613253

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Artificial intelligence is useful for building objective and rapid personal identification systems. It is important to research and develop personal identification methods as social and institutional infrastructure. A critical consideration during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is that there is no contact between the subjects and personal identification systems. The aim of this study was to organize the recent 5-year development of contactless personal identification methods that use artificial intelligence. METHODS: This study used a scoping review approach to map the progression of contactless personal identification systems using artificial intelligence over the past 5 years. An electronic systematic literature search was conducted using the PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and IEEE Xplore databases. Studies published between January 2016 and December 2020 were included in the study. RESULTS: By performing an electronic literature search, 83 articles were extracted. Based on the PRISMA flow diagram, 8 eligible articles were included in this study. These eligible articles were divided based on the analysis targets as follows: (1) face and/or body, (2) eye, and (3) forearm and/or hand. Artificial intelligence, including convolutional neural networks, contributed to the progress of research on contactless personal identification methods. CONCLUSIONS: This study clarified that contactless personal identification methods using artificial intelligence have progressed and that they have used information obtained from the face and/or body, eyes, and forearm and/or hand.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Publications , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Arch Cardiol Mex ; 91(Suplemento COVID): 001-011, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592861

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has created a landslide of publications, from different sources and unequal impact. We considered that the first 3 months are crucial to understand how knowledge has been generated by performing a bibliometric analysis, including the citations to these articles to guide researchers in exploring this field, and to evaluate the relationship between confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths with the number of papers per country. METHODS: Scientific publications were obtained from PubMed (January-March 2020) and their citations during the first 6 months retrieved from the Scopus database. An analysis of the number of papers by country, approach (type and category of publication), and impact was made. A multiple linear regression model was implemented to analyze the correlation between the number of publications and confirmed cases and deaths. RESULTS: A total of 2,530 publications were analyzed with 59,104 citations (23.4 citations/article), written by authors from 67 countries. China was the country with more publications (988, 39%) and more citations (36,416, 63%) followed by the United States with 423 articles (16.7%) and 7,458 citations (12.6%). The coauthorship network identified 10,756 authors. According to the multivariate analysis, both confirmed cases and deaths were significantly correlated with the number of publications per country (corrected by population size and gross domestic product). CONCLUSION: The correlation with the number of publications suggests that cases and deaths had some impact on the medical literature, reflecting how rapidly the scientific community has been on the frontline in the fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Biomedical Research/trends , China , Databases, Factual , Humans , Pandemics , Publications/statistics & numerical data , United States
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(48): e27756, 2021 Dec 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583964

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Globally, congenital cataract remains one of the main causes of visual loss in children. This study was designed to plot the overall research output and evaluate some key bibliometric indicators in congenital cataracts research. METHODS: Publications on congenital cataracts were retrieved from the Web of Science Core Collection database. The published literature was searched using the keywords "congenital cataract" OR "congenital cataracts" in the title filed with document types and language restrictions. The data were exported into HistCite to analyze; publication year, top authors, countries, institutions, journals, keywords, and most cited studies. VOSviewer software was used to construct network visualization mapping. RESULTS: A total of 1427 publications (1903-2021) published in English language were included in this study. Over the past few decades, the total number of publications in congenital cataracts was found to be increased. The most productive year was 2016 (n = 72), while the most cited year was 1941 (1268 citations). The Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science (Impact Factor: 4.799) was the most attractive journal with 161 publications, and the Molecular Vision (Impact Factor : 2.367) was the most cited journal with 1915 citations and 161.723 citations per year. The most productive country was the United States of America (USA) (n = 325), while the most active institute was Sun Yat-sen University, China (n = 36). The most prolific author was Yao K (n = 27). The most studied Web of Science category was ophthalmology (n = 852). The most widely used keyword was congenital (n = 1427). The most cited paper in congenital cataracts was "Congenital cataract following German measles in the mother, cited 1268 times. The USA and author keyword congenital cataract had the highest total link strength. CONCLUSION: These findings provide useful insights, current status, and trends in clinical research in congenital cataracts. This study can be used to identify future research areas and standard bibliography references for better diagnosis and disease control.


Subject(s)
Cataract , Periodicals as Topic , Publications , Bibliometrics , Cataract/congenital , Child , Databases, Factual , Efficiency , Humans
16.
Trials ; 22(1): 952, 2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582022

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic developed into a global crisis, the enormity and urgency of which accelerated research activities in the field. At the same time, manuscripts describing these research projects underwent fast-track peer review procedures and were published in freely accessible formats. Although full texts about COVID-19 are currently available for free, abstracts continue to play a key role since they provide essential information and possibly a decision basis for therapies. Abstracts are particularly important in case the full texts are not free, not all reports have been published in English and in emergency situations when there is less time for comprehensive analysis of all full texts. It is therefore necessary to ensure that abstracts-as publications in miniature format-contain comprehensive and transparent information. The CONSORT statement for abstracts (CONSORT-A) offers guidelines to authors how to include all necessary information in an abstract. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the quality of reporting in medical research had already been the object of debate and criticism. The current crisis makes comprehensive documentation all the more important. Abstracts of COVID-19 RCTs should therefore report the criteria listed in the CONSORT-A statement fully and verifiably. The objective of this study is to check the completeness of abstracts of all COVID-19 RTCs published to date. METHODS: Based on a literature search in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library, all publications up to 29 October 2020 are identified and examined in terms of the subject matter (reported results from COVID-19 studies) and their study design (RTC). Subsequently, suitable publications are examined for completeness and quality of abstracts. The CONSORT checklist for RTC abstracts serves as a basis in this procedure. The primary endpoint of the study is the percentage of correctly implemented items of the CONSORT statement for abstracts. The frequency of correct reporting of each individual item is checked in a second step. DISCUSSION: The study is expected to contribute to evaluating the reporting quality on COVID-19 studies, and specifically the completeness of abstracts of RTCs. It may thus support the assessment of current research into COVID-19. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registration was not required as the study investigated existing literature.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cocos , Humans , Pandemics , Publications , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(49): e345, 2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581389

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, publications on the disease have exploded globally. The present study analyzed PubMed and KoreaMed indexed COVID-19 publications by Korean researchers from January 1, 2020 to August 19, 2021. A total of 83,549 COVID-19 articles were recorded in PubMed and 1,875 of these were published by Korean authors in 673 journals (67 Korean and 606 overseas journals). The KoreaMed platform covered 766 articles on COVID-19, including 612 by Korean authors. Among the Journal of Korean Medical Science (JKMS) articles on COVID-19, PubMed covered 176 and KoreaMed 141 documents. Korean researchers contributed to 2.2% of global publications on COVID-19 in PubMed. The JKMS has published most articles on COVID-19 in Korea.


Subject(s)
Bibliographies as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Periodicals as Topic , PubMed , Publications , Abstracting and Indexing , Databases, Bibliographic , Global Health , Humans , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Clin Invest ; 131(24)2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573960

ABSTRACT

In this editorial, we describe the experience of the JCI editors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our goal is to share how we operated during the pandemic, recount how the JCI contributed to the response, highlight some of the major papers we published on SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19, and impart our insights in the hope that these are helpful to journal editors that may need to deal with similar types of crises in the future.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Publications , SARS-CoV-2 , China/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Motivation , Pandemics , Public Health , Quarantine , Social Isolation , United States/epidemiology
19.
Int J Dev Biol ; 65(7-8-9): 457-464, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571997

ABSTRACT

The Spanish Society for Developmental Biology (SEBD) organized its 17th meeting in November 2020 (herein referred to as SEBD2020). This meeting, originally programmed to take place in the city of Bilbao, was forced onto an online format due to the SARS-CoV2, COVID-19 pandemic. Although, we missed the live personal interactions and missed out on the Bilbao social scene, we were able to meet online to present our work and discuss our latest results. An overview of the activities that took place around the meeting, the different scientific sessions and the speakers involved are presented here. The pros and cons of virtual meetings are discussed.


Subject(s)
Developmental Biology/methods , Developmental Biology/trends , Animals , Cell Biology/trends , Developmental Biology/education , Humans , Internet , Models, Animal , Nervous System , Peer Review , Publications , Publishing , Regeneration , Schools , Societies, Medical , Spain
20.
Med Sci (Paris) ; 37(11): 1035-1041, 2021 Nov.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545678

ABSTRACT

In order to effectively contribute to scientific knowledge, biomedical observations have to be validated and debated by scientists in the relevant field. Along this debate that mainly takes place in the scientific literature, citation of previous studies plays a major role. However, only a few academic studies have quantitatively evaluated the suitability and accuracy of scientific citations. Here we review these academic studies. Two types of misuse have been pointed out: Citation bias and citation distortion. First, scientific citations favor positive results and those supporting authors' conclusion. Second, many statements linked to a reference actually misrepresent the referenced findings. About 10% of all citations in biomedicine are strongly inaccurate and misleading for the reader. Finally, we give two examples illustrating how some citation misuses do affect public health: The opioid crisis in the USA and the unjustified fostering of hydroxychloroquine for Covid-19 treatment in France.


TITLE: Le mésusage des citations et ses conséquences en médecine. ABSTRACT: Les observations biomédicales ne deviennent une source de connaissance qu'après un débat entre chercheurs. Au cours de ce débat, la citation des études antérieures tient un rôle majeur, mais les travaux académiques qui en évaluent l'usage sont rares. Ils ont cependant pu révéler deux types de problèmes : les biais de citation et les écarts de sens entre l'étude antérieure citée et ce qu'en dit l'article citant. Dans cette revue, nous synthétisons ces travaux et en dégageons les principales caractéristiques : les études favorables à la conclusion des auteurs citants sont plus souvent citées que celles qui les questionnent ; des écarts de sens majeurs affectent environ 10 % des citations. Nous illustrons par deux exemples les conséquences de ce mésusage des citations.


Subject(s)
Public Health , Publication Bias , Publications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Opioid Epidemic
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL