Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 14 de 14
Filter
1.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 10: 23247096211063332, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603889

ABSTRACT

We present the case of a 56-year-old woman who was diagnosed with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome who was intubated for 19 days. She recovered from COVID-19 after a month. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest, after a month, showed improved infiltrates with a small residual cavity within the lingula. A CT angiogram showed a more confluent density in the lingular portion on follow-up 2 months later. She developed intermittent hemoptysis after 3 months in December 2020, which persisted for almost 6 months, and CT of the chest showed the lingular nodular with resolution of the cavitation. She underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, confirming Aspergillus fumigatus by galactomannan assay and histology showing branching hyphae. Once she started treatment with itraconazole, her hemoptysis resolved. The follow-up CT of the chest after 2 months of treatment did not show a cavity or a nodule in the lingula. Our patient developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) as a sequela of severe COVID-19 infection. COVID-19-associated invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) is an underrecognized complication that needs to be investigated on whether prophylactic treatment is required. Our case also demonstrates that the diagnosis of IPA needs to be considered months after COVID-19 infection when a superimposed fungal infection can occur after a viral infection if the patient continues to have persistent symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis , Pulmonary Aspergillosis , Aspergillus fumigatus , Female , Humans , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(1): e0001021, 2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262384

ABSTRACT

The ongoing global pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), first described in Wuhan, China. A subset of COVID-19 patients has been reported to have acquired secondary infections by microbial pathogens, such as opportunistic fungal pathogens from the genus Aspergillus. To gain insight into COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA), we analyzed the genomes and characterized the phenotypic profiles of four CAPA isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus obtained from patients treated in the area of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. By examining the mutational spectrum of single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertion-deletion polymorphisms, and copy number variants among 206 genes known to modulate A. fumigatus virulence, we found that CAPA isolate genomes do not exhibit significant differences from the genome of the Af293 reference strain. By examining a number of factors, including virulence in an invertebrate moth model, growth in the presence of osmotic, cell wall, and oxidative stressors, secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and the MIC of antifungal drugs, we found that CAPA isolates were generally, but not always, similar to A. fumigatus reference strains Af293 and CEA17. Notably, CAPA isolate D had more putative loss-of-function mutations in genes known to increase virulence when deleted. Moreover, CAPA isolate D was significantly more virulent than the other three CAPA isolates and the A. fumigatus reference strains Af293 and CEA17, but similarly virulent to two other clinical strains of A. fumigatus. These findings expand our understanding of the genomic and phenotypic characteristics of isolates that cause CAPA. IMPORTANCE The global pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has already killed millions of people. COVID-19 patient outcome can be further complicated by secondary infections, such as COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA). CAPA is caused by Aspergillus fungal pathogens, but there is little information about the genomic and phenotypic characteristics of CAPA isolates. We conducted genome sequencing and extensive phenotyping of four CAPA isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus from Germany. We found that CAPA isolates were often, but not always, similar to other reference strains of A. fumigatus across 206 genetic determinants of infection-relevant phenotypes, including virulence. For example, CAPA isolate D was more virulent than other CAPA isolates and reference strains in an invertebrate model of fungal disease, but similarly virulent to two other clinical strains. These results expand our understanding of COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis.


Subject(s)
Aspergillus fumigatus/genetics , COVID-19/complications , Genomics , Phenotype , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Aged , Antifungal Agents , Aspergillus , Aspergillus fumigatus/classification , Aspergillus fumigatus/drug effects , Aspergillus fumigatus/isolation & purification , Female , Humans , Male , Metabolomics , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Mutation , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , SARS-CoV-2 , Secondary Metabolism/genetics , Virulence/genetics
7.
Mycoses ; 64(4): 457-464, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079004

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) has emerged as an invasive fungal disease, often affecting previously immunocompetent, mechanically ventilated, intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Incidence rates of 3.8%-33.3% have been reported depending on the geographic area, with high (47%) mortality. OBJECTIVES: Here, we describe a single-centre prospective case series with CAPA cases from both the first (March-May, n = 5/33) and second (mid-September through mid-December, n = 8/33) COVID-19 wave at a 500-bed teaching hospital in the Netherlands. PATIENTS/METHODS: In the first COVID-19 wave, a total of 265 SARS-CoV-2 PCR-positive patients were admitted to our hospital of whom 33 needed intubation and mechanical ventilation. In the second wave, 508 SARS-CoV-2 PCR-positive patients were admitted of whom 33 needed mechanical ventilation. Data were prospectively collected. RESULTS: We found a significant decrease in COVID-19 patients needing mechanical ventilation in the ICU in the second wave (p < .01). From these patients, however, a higher percentage were diagnosed with CAPA (24.2% vs 15.2%), although not significant (p = .36). All CAPA patients encountered in the second wave received dexamethasone. Mortality between both groups was similarly high (40%-50%). Moreover, we found environmental TR34 /L98H azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus isolates in two separate patients. CONCLUSIONS: In this series, 19.7% (n = 13/66) of mechanically ventilated SARS-CoV-2 patients were diagnosed with CAPA. In addition, we found a significant reduction in COVID-19 patients needing mechanical ventilation on the ICU in the second wave. Numbers are too small to determine whether there is a true difference in CAPA incidence in mechanically ventilated patients between the two waves, and whether it could be attributed to dexamethasone SARS-CoV-2 therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Netherlands/epidemiology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/etiology , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/mortality , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
8.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(6): e149-e162, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-974782

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 causes direct damage to the airway epithelium, enabling aspergillus invasion. Reports of COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis have raised concerns about it worsening the disease course of COVID-19 and increasing mortality. Additionally, the first cases of COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis caused by azole-resistant aspergillus have been reported. This article constitutes a consensus statement on defining and managing COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis, prepared by experts and endorsed by medical mycology societies. COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis is proposed to be defined as possible, probable, or proven on the basis of sample validity and thus diagnostic certainty. Recommended first-line therapy is either voriconazole or isavuconazole. If azole resistance is a concern, then liposomal amphotericin B is the drug of choice. Our aim is to provide definitions for clinical research and up-to-date recommendations for clinical management of the diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis.


Subject(s)
Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Coinfection/drug therapy , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Amphotericin B , Azoles/pharmacology , Humans , Nitriles , Pyridines , SARS-CoV-2 , Triazoles , Voriconazole/therapeutic use
9.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883831

ABSTRACT

Aspergillosis complicating severe influenza infection has been increasingly detected worldwide. Recently, coronavirus disease-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) has been detected through rapid reports, primarily from centers in Europe. We provide a case series of CAPA, adding 20 cases to the literature, with review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and outcomes. The syndromes of pulmonary aspergillosis complicating severe viral infections are distinct from classic invasive aspergillosis, which is recognized most frequently in persons with neutropenia and in other immunocompromised persons. Combined with severe viral infection, aspergillosis comprises a constellation of airway-invasive and angio-invasive disease and results in risks associated with poor airway fungus clearance and killing, including virus- or inflammation-associated epithelial damage, systemic immunosuppression, and underlying lung disease. Radiologic abnormalities can vary, reflecting different pathologies. Prospective studies reporting poor outcomes in CAPA patients underscore the urgent need for strategies to improve diagnosis, prevention, and therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Risk Factors
12.
Mycopathologia ; 185(4): 607-611, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691056

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic emerged in Wuhan, China, in late 2109, and has rapidly spread around the world. Until May 25, 2020, there were 133,521 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 7359 deaths in Iran. The role of opportunistic fungal infections in the morbidity and mortality of COVID-19 patients remains less defined. Based on our multicenter experiences, we categorized the risks of opportunistic fungal infections in COVID-19 patients in Iran. The COVID-19 patients at high risk included those with acute respiratory distress syndrome, in intensive care units, receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics, immunosuppressants or corticosteroid, and supported by invasive or noninvasive ventilation. The patients were most likely to develop pulmonary aspergillosis, oral candidiasis, or pneumocystis pneumonia. Most diagnoses were probable as the accurate diagnosis of opportunistic fungal infections remains challenging in resource-poor settings. We summarize the clinical signs and laboratory tests needed to confirm candidiasis, aspergillosis, or pneumocystosis in our COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Mycoses/complications , Opportunistic Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Candidiasis, Oral/complications , Candidiasis, Oral/diagnosis , Candidiasis, Oral/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Mycoses/diagnosis , Mycoses/epidemiology , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pharyngeal Diseases/complications , Pharyngeal Diseases/diagnosis , Pharyngeal Diseases/epidemiology , Pharyngeal Diseases/microbiology , Pneumocystis carinii , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/complications , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/microbiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/epidemiology
13.
J Crit Care ; 59: 149-155, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635492

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Pathological data of critical ill COVID-19 patients is essential in the search for optimal treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed postmortem needle core lung biopsies in seven patients with COVID-19 related ARDS. Clinical, radiological and microbiological characteristics are reported together with histopathological findings. MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: Patients age ranged from 58 to 83 years, five males and two females were included. Time from hospital admission to death ranged from 12 to 36 days, with a mean of 20 ventilated days. ICU stay was complicated by pulmonary embolism in five patients and positive galactomannan on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in six patients, suggesting COVID-19 associated pulmonary aspergillosis. Chest CT in all patients showed ground glass opacities, commonly progressing to nondependent consolidations. We observed four distinct histopathological patterns: acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia, diffuse alveolar damage, fibrosis and, in four out of seven patients an organizing pneumonia. None of the biopsy specimens showed any signs of invasive aspergillosis. CONCLUSIONS: In this case series common late histopathology in critically ill COVID patients is not classic DAD but heterogeneous with predominant pattern of organizing pneumonia. Postmortem biopsy investigations in critically COVID-19 patients with probable COVID-19 associated pulmonary aspergillosis obtained no evidence for invasive aspergillosis.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/pathology , Lung/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autopsy , Betacoronavirus , Biopsy , Biopsy, Large-Core Needle , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , COVID-19 , Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Critical Illness , Female , Galactose/analogs & derivatives , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Male , Mannans/metabolism , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Phenotype , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
Mycoses ; 63(6): 528-534, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-547397

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to viral infection are at risk for secondary complications like invasive aspergillosis. Our study evaluates coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) associated invasive aspergillosis at a single centre in Cologne, Germany. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all patients with COVID-19 associated ARDS admitted to the medical or surgical intensive care unit at the University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. RESULTS: COVID-19 associated invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was found in five of 19 consecutive critically ill patients with moderate to severe ARDS. CONCLUSION: Clinicians caring for patients with ARDS due to COVID-19 should consider invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and subject respiratory samples to comprehensive analysis to detect co-infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Aged , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Female , Galactose/analogs & derivatives , Germany , Hemorrhage/etiology , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lung Diseases/etiology , Male , Mannans/analysis , Metapneumovirus/isolation & purification , Middle Aged , Nitriles/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Paramyxoviridae Infections/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnostic imaging , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies , Thorax/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Triazoles/therapeutic use , Voriconazole/therapeutic use
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...